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Creo Set Up

clucas
1-Newbie

Creo Set Up

Our company is in the process of switching over to Creo from another solid modeling software. I am looking for recommendations on third party groups that are knowledgeable in the are of


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4 REPLIES 4
BenLoosli
22-Sapphire II
(To:clucas)

Training classes cover those topics.
Almost any VAR should have some people who can be brought in as consultants to guide you or do the work for you.

Training is an investment in your people, not an expense.


Thank you,

Ben H. Loosli
USEC, INC.

In my experience most VAR's are interested in selling you the software, and don't spend much time on helping you architect your software configurations. Systems I've seen have had very sparse configurations.

It's far better if you at least know what is possible in the software before you talk with a VAR.

For example, did you know that you can define a cross section style from a cross section library to be applied to a part when you assign it a material? And along with that, the material can also assign a color and texture to the part. And the material can also have user defined parameters that can be used to fill out a BOM on the drawing. That's just one hundreds of little things you ought to know before you architect your ProE configurations.

A company just starting out with ProE/Creo, has a unique opportunity to put all the bells and whistles in place from the get go. Most of us have legacy data that makes adding all the convenience features much more difficult.

David Haigh
mlockwood
19-Tanzanite
(To:clucas)

Going back ~ 15 years, I became the "Pro/E Administrator" here. At the time, we had essentially no standards, mapkeys, etc., etc. and were using Versions 15, 16, 18 and 2000i all at the same time in the same building. Every Friday was reserved for "aligning the data" which meant laboriously undoing all the problems of the week - and no design work was allowed. Horrible, obviously.

Today, mostly because of others on my team, especially Frank and JP, we now routinely have on the order of 40 Engineers and Designers working on the same assembly at the same time - with essentially no issues. This is all due to: Top Down Design, Large Assembly Management, standardization of templates, smart Drawing Formats, smart repeat-region tables, careful attention to Parameters / Attributes, good libraries of colors, textures, etc, good libraries of purchased components, super-users in every functional area, formally-documented Windchill PDMLink procedures and training, etc., etc.

Contractors who come here invariably remark about our standards, best practices and work processes.

My only recommendation from above is that yes, investment (ongoing) in this type of thing is hugely important and has the potential for great payoff. What you are doing is the right thing. The opposite unfortunately is also true - if you don't invest time and effort in this area, chaos inevitably results. You basically cannot turn a high-powered system (Windchill + Creo, etc.) loose to users without some significant planning and admin attention and effort.

My suggestion is to bring in some experienced Pro-E users, and avoid BSer's. Training really only amounts to a starting point from which you begin to learn Pro-E, and many high dollar consultants fall into the "BS" catagory and are mainly looking for return visits at high hourly rates. They will normally setup things that you'll have difficulty figuring out the what, where and why of. Most companies that I've worked at that had poor implementations either resisted bringing in knowledgable and experience users, or brought in some guys that sound (BS) good but had only limited knowledge and experience. A lot of the decisions made early on will have long term effects, and basic training doesn't prepare users well enough to make those decisions. One the of best implementations I experienced was a company that brought in several highly experienced and knowledgable Pro-E users.

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