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Locating Assembly Parts

SOLVED
Amethyst

Locating Assembly Parts

Hi all,

The company i work for uses mapped drives for all of our CAD files (no PDM suite).  To be honest, it's a mess.  I need to know if there is a "smart" way to locate a part, aside from going into microsoft explorer and searching.  For example, If I open a drawing, open the top assembly and then open the part... Is there any information in the part that would tell me where it's being pulled from?

I backed up assembly drawings from our Released CAD folder to my local drive for an ECR and now I'm ready to upload. Only problem is that I am having trouble locating exactly where the affected parts that were in the drawing that I backed up are located.

Thanks!

CP 2.0 M150
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions

Re: Locating Assembly Parts

Add this to your config.pro file and it will display full path in your Creo title bar as well as in the information window when you use model information box (all highlighted picks in screenshot below).  And this will work in bot part and assembly files:

display_full_object_path YES

Part Location Picks.JPG

Hope this helps,

Shane V.

7 REPLIES 7

Re: Locating Assembly Parts

Add this to your config.pro file and it will display full path in your Creo title bar as well as in the information window when you use model information box (all highlighted picks in screenshot below).  And this will work in bot part and assembly files:

display_full_object_path YES

Part Location Picks.JPG

Hope this helps,

Shane V.

Re: Locating Assembly Parts

There is no "hard-coding" of the file locations with part or assembly files. Creo can use search paths in the config file to find files on your drives.

If your company already has this setup, are there other users you can ask within the company to see how they manage changes. Hopefully someone has a good handle on the process because, as you say, "it's a mess" and can quickly escalate to a catastrophe if files are duplicated in multiple locations.

Stephen Williams
Pro/E Version 15/16 (Circa 1995/1996)

Re: Locating Assembly Parts

There's only one other CAD user who is not an engineer.  He used to be a machinist and has no formal computer aided design education or training.  He said that he normally just works directly from the Released CAD files, which seems like a really bad idea to me.  He wouldn't have the problem of locating dependent and affected part files, but if he makes an unintended change and the ECR is released (no checking process in place) that could potentially be a disaster if the unintended changes are manufactured to and make it to the customer.

So no, I'm basically flying solo here as far as the art of drafting is concerned.  I only had a couple of year of experience when I got here, so I think I know just enough to.. know better?  I've been leaning on these boards for help

CP 2.0 M150

Re: Locating Assembly Parts

Hi Shane,

Thank you so much!  I was able to locate all of the affected parts in a large assembly which was pulled from a directory of hundreds of folders and sub-folders.  Certainly not impossible, but this helps a lot!... The snip with highlights is perfect.

CP 2.0 M150

Re: Locating Assembly Parts

I agree with the "know better" concept. I've worked in an environment where we did that and it can quickly get out of control.

Glad you found a solution. I think your concept of pulling the files out to a "working directory" and then "checking them back in" is a good work method but time consuming from the file management standpoint.

I used PDMLink now so I'm not much help, but there are many many other users who use file folder storage methods, maybe they can give you some tips and techniques to improve your process.

Stephen Williams
Pro/E Version 15/16 (Circa 1995/1996)
Highlighted

Re: Locating Assembly Parts

We have been using a "Windows Explorer" file system as data management for 20+ years with about 80,000 files, the largest percentage being PTC files, and a mix of Autodesk, SolidWorks, Microsoft, Adobe, etc. making up the rest. This is all with about 20 drafters/designers/engineeers getting in and out of the files for doing their daily work. I personally have finally talked upper management into Windchill/PDMlink after 16 years of asking so we are going through that right now and can't wait to run with that. The file system takes a lot of regimented thought and dedication on who/when/where/why/how someone is touching and changing files. And it comes down to write access and who and when things get "checked" back in to a protected location. If you need more info we could set up something off line sometime but just know that it is very possible to run the way you are going. Good luck.

Re: Locating Assembly Parts

Congrats on the upgrade!  In my "former life", I used an Intralink/Enovia combination for PDM/file process management.  At my current position, we use the windows explorer system as well and it has been very hard for me to get used to.  Honestly, I would rather NOT get used to it and have been pushing for a cost-effective PDM suite.  The ball is rolling and we are hopefully going to be transitioning to DDM within the next few months.  I explained to my engineering manager that our current system is very ambiguous and has the potential to blow up in our faces one day.  The risk of making a mistake that makes its way all the way to the customer could very well cost more than a yearly subscription to a PDM suite. In addition to that, aside from the initial time lost to training, efficiency will increase among CAD users.

I think you hit the nail on the head when you say it comes down to write access.  You could designate write access to a "released" server drive.  But regardless of write access, you still rely on those users to upload correctly.  There is no formal checkout/in process and revision control is not as strong as it could be.  With software that will hold your hand every step of the way, you limit risk and headaches.  Mistakes can still be made, but the history and documentation is there.

CP 2.0 M150