cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Add common Characters to text input such as "less than or equal to" or "greater than or equal to"

Add common Characters to text input such as "less than or equal to" or "greater than or equal to"

We should not have to enter alt codes which are non-intuitive, must be memorized (or slow), and unstable (often font dependent):

  • ≤ "less than or equal to"
  • ≥ "greater than or equal to"
  • And less commonly:
    • ≠ "Not equal to"  
    • ≈ "Approximately"
    • Greek Letters
    • Perhaps a good way to handle this is by opening MS Word and looking at the symbols used there and how they are organized and mimic use that as your starting point.
  • Folks, please add whatever characters to the comments below that you would like to see that I haven't mentioned here.

 

Add Here in Creo.  Could even have extended menu options.

lscheeler_0-1618242873338.png

 

7 Comments
BenLoosli
Sapphire II

Are we talking about font.fnt or TrueType fonts?

ALL characters are font dependent, so we need to determine which font(s) PTC will drive us to use in the future.

We have switched from font.fnt to isofont.fnt because it handles the differences between 'l' (lower L) and 'I' (upper I) and '1' (one) as well as between  '0' (zero) and 'O' (upper O).

 

Maybe this an area that all CAD vendors could fund and develop a universal CAD drafting TrueType font that could be used by NX, CATIA, Creo, AutoCAD and others.

lscheeler
Pearl

@BenLoosli, I think that it is a brilliant idea for CAD vendors to unite (if that is even possible!) to create a standard.  However, I don't think that this necessarily relates to this idea.  This idea is simply about extending the extra characters that are used in Creo.  As I understand it PTC made these special characters somewhat font independent.  If I am mistaken on this please correct me with details to help me understand how.

BenLoosli
Sapphire II

All of the font files (*.fnt) are custom files created by PTC and only useable in Creo. Any characters in these files is dependent on what PTC put in the files. The issue you get with 'special' characters is what keystroke do you use to 'call' that character from the font file?

I think the direction that PTC is headed is to do away with these out-dated font files and utilize 'industry standard' TrueType font files that are also used by Microsoft applications.

 

lscheeler
Pearl

I am not sure what that implies.  Are you saying that these special symbols will then take care of themselves in the TTF and OTF fonts and we will be able to use them as TTF/OTF?  Or are you saying because they are going to TTF/OTF that this will be a hinderance?

BenLoosli
Sapphire II

I think we need PTC to chime in here and gives us a direction on where they are going with fonts and how much longer they will be supporting the font, isofont and other *.fnt files. If you look at a .src file for a font, you will see it is basically gerber pen commands of Up, Down and Move. Most of the .src files where created over 25 years ago.

Any font file used will need some alt-<char> to get a symbol as most symbols are not on a standard keyboard. There is no 'equal or less than' or 'equal or greater than' key, etc.

True Type fonts are not much different, someone had to design the character and give it an identifying character, wither a key or a special alt-<char> to find the information in the file.

lscheeler
Pearl

@PTCModerator, can you help get us connected to the correct PTC person?

Thanks! Lawrence

Chris3
Opal

Arial is the default TTF for templates per these comments:
https://community.ptc.com/t5/Creo-Parametric-Ideas/The-Number-quot-1-quot/idc-p/453389/highlight/tru...

https://community.ptc.com/t5/Creo-Parametric-Ideas/The-Number-quot-1-quot/idc-p/500411/highlight/tru... 

 

Obviously Arial has some serious drawbacks. Fonts have also been discussed at the links below:

https://community.ptc.com/t5/System-Administration/Switching-from-Stroked-Fonts-to-True-Type-Fonts-D... 

Inconsolata was mentioned as a close alternative.