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Merging components of weldment assembly fails to display merged edges in drawings

Merging components of weldment assembly fails to display merged edges in drawings

We need a better technique for assembly cuts used in large fabricated weldments. In general I am against assembly features because of the large regeneration times.

In the past I learned to use the merge technique to create two different objects; the first is weldment assembly with no drilled holes and no tap threads (due to common beams used across the weldment structure).

The second object is a part (not assembly) that has all the structural beams merged into a single blob. Here we can apply features to a part, but the problem is that we lose the boundaries between all the touching models that were merged into one. It really looks wrong in drawing mode, when you cannot see these boundaries.

The problem with parts merged, is that you lose all the internal boundaries. The part now looks like a casted part containing the outer shape but with no boundaries for the drawing. There are no internal boundaries once merged - the object is now a single closed solid. The work around now is to manually draw curves in the new merged part to represent the lost boundaries.

I am requesting an enhancement to see the original boundaries that existed before the merge. There should be an option during the merge process to select “create component boundaries”.

Thank you,

Ronnie A. Shand

Staff Mechanical Design Engineer

Lockheed Martin Mission Sensors & Training MST

100 East 17th Street

Riviera Beach, Florida 33404

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Phone 561-471-4342

2 Comments
Guest

Ronnie,

  To create our weldment drawing we first create a "machined" assembly and apply all of the machined features in the part models.

  We then merge with "Inheritance" each welding component into a separate empty part model.

  Merging with inheritance allows features from the merged part to display in the model tree. This allows us to suppress any "machined" features that are not in the weldment.

  We can then make an assembly of these "un-machined" (or partially machined) models to create our weldment assembly drawings. Each weldment component now has its own boundary.

  Another big advantage is that crosshatching is also separate for each weldment component.

  The only drawbacks/issues we've had with this method is that:

1. Not using assembly cuts sometimes requires duplicating features in the part models.

2. Modifications to merge parts does not automatically update and requires updating the assembly and drawing sheets separately.

Randy

Community Manager
Status changed to: Archived