cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Community Tip - Did you get an answer that solved your problem? Please mark it as an Accepted Solution so others with the same problem can find the answer easily. X

Creo Parametric Tips

Sort by:
Check out this video on Creo "Sketcher" from PTC Application Engineers Presenters: Emily Pinto (Solution Consultant) and Ryan Butcher (Solution Consultant, Fellow) Original Date Presented: March 19, 2024   To dive deeper into the subject, check out Creo "Sketcher".
View full tip
Check out this video on Creo Additive MFG from PTC Application Engineers Presenters: Lino Tozzi (Solution Consultant, Fellow) and Ryan Butcher (Solution Consultant, Fellow) Original Date Presented: November 14, 2023 To dive deeper into the subject, check out Creo Additive MFG.      
View full tip
Check out this video on Creo: "Things You Might Know, but Probably Don't from PTC Application Engineers. Presenters:  Ryan Butcher (Technical Specialist, Fellow) Original Date Presented: September 19,, 2023   To dive deeper into the subject, check out Creo UI Tips.  
View full tip
Check out this video on Creo Composites from PTC Application Engineers Presenters: Lee Goodwin (Technical Specialist, Principal) and Ryan Butcher (Technical Specialist, Fellow) Original Date Presented: August 15,, 2023 To dive deeper into the subject, check out Creo Composites Learning.  
View full tip
Check out this video on What's New in Creo 10 Tips and Techniques session  from PTC Application Engineers. Presenters: Jason Petersen (Solution Consulting, Principle) and Ryan Butcher (Solution Consulting, Fellow).   What's New in Creo 10 Learning  
View full tip
Creo Parametric: Multibody Home --  Start Here!   I'm creating this blog to be the central home page for anyone interested in trying out the new capabilities first introduced in Creo 7.0  that support multibody design. Below will be links to other blog posts on specific detailed topics under the general heading of multibody. I'm interested in getting your feedback on all the new stuff, but I also want to try to do this in a somewhat organized fashion. So, you can think of this blog as the top node of a tree that will have a number of branches below it for the various multibody related topics.   In parallel to the list of blog posts below, I also plan to maintain a Multibody Infos post that provides you with links to further information, documentation, presentations, and any other information bits and pieces around multibody design in Creo. To get going effectively, I encourage you to first go through the What’s new material and tutorials that you find there, so that you have an overview and high level background on the use cases and capabilities. That will allow me then to go one level deeper and include some tips, tricks etc. in the blog posted here. I hope to be able to post new information regularly and hope you tune in, find it beneficial and give feedback in return.   If you want to send me private messages, that’s fine, too. In particular if you have any suggestion on future blog post topics or questions, feel free to contact me at mneumueller@ptc.com . Enjoy…Martin   Blog posts: Multibody – Intro, Model tree interaction and What’s that default body doing? Multibody- Seven 90sec-Tipps & Tricks around Booleans & Split Multibody - So many ways to trim a body Multibody - Creo 7.0.1 Enhancements  Multibody -  Windchill 12 & Creo 7.0.1 Multibody –How to display a body parameter in the model tree  Multibody – How to display, use or call-out a body parameter – Part 1  Multibody - How to display, use or call-out a body parameter – Part 2 Multibody - Body selection, Body object vs Surface referencing Multibody - How to get rid of a body? -  Show/Hide vs Remove Body vs Delete Body Multibody - How to save out a single body to .stl or step? Multibody - How does this all work with reference parts for MoldDesign and  NC?  Multibody - What are these Construction bodies? and all the details around them…. How to create a body intersection curve and what might it be good for? Multibody - How do I >position< bodies?  Multibody - A simple body-based motion envelope cutout example Multibody - Clearance & Creepage Analysis Multibody - Model Tree Auto-locate capability: Update – Creo 7.0 vs Creo 8.0 & Creo 9.0 Multibody - External Copy Geometry (ECG) and body attribute propagation Multibody –  A "Geometry Re-use"- Use Case that became possible with new capabilities in Creo 10.0  ..... And more to come…
View full tip
  Hello everyone and welcome to blog post #14 in this multibody blog series.   Today’s blog is about the use of the “Intersect” Feature to create the intersection curve between two bodies (or quilts) You might remember that Creo 7.0 introduced Boolean Operations to perform merge, subtract and intersect operations between bodies. These operations act upon a “target” body which is modified during the Boolean operation. The resulting object there is still a body. In order to create an intersection curve, we therefore cannot use the Body Boolean operations feature, but will use the “Intersect” feature within the “Editing” group.   Starting with Creo 7.0, this “Intersect” feature allows to select bodies as references. In this first example, we select Body 1 (yellow box) and Body  (grey cylinder) and get the full intersection curve as a result. This is illustrated in the image below. (Result is shown in small overlay image)   Note that you could also select just a single body in combination with one or multiple surfaces to get a partial intersection curve. In the example illustrated below we create the intersection curve based on a selection of the grey body 2 and 2 selected (red) surfaces of the yellow body 1.   Finally, what could this intersection curve be used for? Intersection curves allow for a fast creation of a quilt representing the surface contours that are covered by the intersection (in particular for closed curves). You can for example use the curve generated in the first example as input to create a designated area. The image below shows the “Designated Area” feature with the closed intersection curve as input when placed on the yellow Body 1. The resulting quilt is illustrated in the small additional image.   Starting with Creo 9.0 and higher you can also divide/split these surfaces based on those curves. Watch the video below to see an example use case of this. And as I was at video creation, I thought I could also re-emphasize the usage of Body visibility controls The usage of intent surfaces created by features such as “Divide Surface” and “Boolean Operations”     Thanks for reading.  I hope it was informative. If you liked it, give it a Kudo.   Back to Creo Parametric- Multibody Home: Start Here!   Enjoy!....Martin
View full tip
Hello everyone and welcome to blog post #20 in this multibody blog series.   Today’s blog is about illustrating a use case around geometry re-use that became enabled with the new appearance (and reference) propagations in Creo 10.0’s Body Boolean and Split Body features.  (see Multibody: Appearance and Reference Propagation for Boolean Operations (ptc.com) )  In essence we added two new options to Body Booleans as shown in the image below.   Those options allow you to control color propagation and reference propagation. That means for the below example, that when you subtract the orange and white bodies from the green eyelet part, we can propagate the color to the corresponding mating cut faces, and transfer references from the original to the new surfaces, so that for the attached annotations automatically move to the cut surfaces.       So, what is this good for? An example use case for this might be a scenario where you have standardized cut-outs for a connector where you model the cut-outs as fully detailed and annotated bodies in a library part.   These bodies will then be inserted along with their annotations into the connector part where we then subtract and pattern them. During the subtract operation we can then not only create the target cut-out geometry, but also have the colors and the annotation references be transferred to the cut-out surfaces. All the sematic references of these annotations would thus continue to show in a semantic query for selected annotations. Here you see a video illustrating the workflow for the above example in Creo 10.0     Thanks for reading.  I hope it was informative and this is a valuable use case for you. If you liked it, give it a Kudo.   Back to Creo Parametric - Multibody Home: Start Here!   Enjoy!....Martin
View full tip
Check out this video on Creo Automation with Smart Assembly from PTC Application Engineers and Sigmaxim (PTC Partner). Sigmaxim Presenters: Nelson Caperton (Dir, Business Development), Joel Beckley (Dir, Engineering), Michael Denis (Systems Engineer,Carrier) and Ryan Butcher (Solution Consulting, Fellow, PTC).   Creo Automation with Smart Assembly Learning      
View full tip
Check out this video on Creo Parametric Design Automation Tips and Techniques session  from PTC Application Engineers and CadActive (PTC Partner). Presenters: Phil Clukies (Account Manager, CadActive), Ben Bowman (Solutions Engineer, CadActive) and Ryan Butcher (Solution Consulting, Fellow, PTC).   Creo Design Automation Learning  
View full tip
Check out this video on Creo Parametric Ansys Simulation Tips and Techniques session  from PTC Solution Consultants. Presenters: Jason Petersen (Solution Consulting, Principal) and Ryan Butcher (Solution Consulting, Fellow).   Creo 9.0 What's New  
View full tip
In these videos we explore different options to create round geometry that cannot be achieved with one solid round feature. Models can be downloaded from Tech Support article CS322595. Surf-Surf variable radius round with spine Surfaces rounds with boundary blend patch    
View full tip
Check out this video on how to learn Creo Parametric  from PTC.  Presenters: Scott Barkman (PTC University Programs, Director) and Ryan Butcher (Solution Consulting, Fellow).   Creo Parametric Learning   (view in My Videos)
View full tip
Check out this video on Creo Parametric 8 & 9 Update from PTC Application Engineers  Presenters: Lee Goodwin (Solution Consulting, Principle) and Ryan Butcher (Solution Consulting, Fellow).   Creo ECAD MCAD Collaboration Learning   (view in My Videos)
View full tip
Do you need to create a simple model defined by two Helical Sweep Threads - use the Mirror feature
View full tip
Multibody - Model Tree Auto-locate Capability Update – Creo 7.0 vs Creo 8.0 & Creo 9.0    Hello all,   As I got a few comments & questions from time-to-time about the auto-locate functionality and its behavior, I wanted to shed some light on Auto-locate configurations and related changes between Creo 7.0, 8.0 and 9.0.   What is auto-locate? Auto-locate is the capability to automatically find, show and highlight selected items in the tree. When you select geometry in the graphics, auto-locate will find the feature that created that geometry, expand nested tree hierarchy levels where required, and scroll the tree so you can see the tree node of that feature. When auto-locate was introduced, features were shown only once (e.g there was single node in the model tree representing the feature) and so there was no ambiguity as to which tree node instance of the feature to actually auto-locate to.   #1)  Creo 7.0:  With the introduction of Multi-body in Creo 7.0, we introduced the Design Items folder that optionally allowed to list the bodies in the model along with their contributing features. This led to additional feature nodes showing up in the tree. ( Note: The display can be configured within the model tree filter settings)   For Creo 7.0, the following options were available to control the body and body features display:   Note that the option “Auto locate features in body sub-nodes” allowed to control whether a feature node should be located in the feature tree as it worked in the past or whether it should be auto-located underneath the body that it contributes geometry to (e.g. locating the feature node within the contributing features list of/underneath a body)   #2) In Creo 8.0 we added more options, added the display of quilts and their contributing features in the Design Items Folder, and moved the auto-location option to a new place. It now resides together with all the other auto-locate and highlighting related tree options. To control the auto-locate behavior, you now need to go to the “Selection Priority” setting under the tree options and set it to “Feature List” or “Design Items”. As you can see in the screen shot, the round surface  selection in the graphics triggers an auto-location to the feature node in the regular feature tree list and not within the Design Items as the setting is set to "Feature List".   But there is additional flexibility: In a configuration where both trees are shown, you can now actually achieve a simultaneous auto-locate in the feature tree and Design Items tree side-by-side.       #3) In Creo 9.0 (Beta) you will find the Selection Priority in that same place underneath the Tree Options within the tree's new toolbar. In addition you will find some additional auto location related enhancements once this version releases to the public.    I hope that helps you to customize the tree display and the auto-locate behavior to your personal preferences and needs.   Back to Creo 7.0/8.0++ Multibody Home: Start Here!
View full tip
Well-known community member, Stephen, tells us he has two interests: Creo - and saltwater fishing with his wife in the bays along the Texas coast for red drum, black drum, flounder, and sea trout. Below, a good day with a 30-pound black drum he released. Stephen is Texas born and raised, spending most childhood summers on his grandfather’s hard-working farm.  He’s been involved in Pro/Engineer-Creo community since the mid to late 90’s, well before PTC had an integrated community.   He says:  “I enjoy helping other users learn how to use Creo but mostly I like learning things about the software I didn’t know. There is likely not a week that goes by that I don’t learn something on the Community that I can put to use.  I absolutely know that without the community, I wouldn’t be as good of a Creo user.”  We couldn’t have said it better ourselves!   Right now, Stephen makes parts/assemblies and drawings although he said that he used to do a lot with Creo’s routed systems and sheet metal capabilities. He and his team directly support manufacturing and customer integration for everything his employer builds. He kindly shared with us a photo of a project on which he works.    Here’s how he describes the photo below:  "The yellow part is a Subsea Blowout Preventor that is shipping out from our manufacturing facility here in Houston. This is ½ of the product we manufacture here in Houston. This part is about 750,000 pounds of steel. The other ½ is another 500,000 pounds and is not pictured. It ships separately but are used together for offshore drilling as passive safety devices.   It took 3 days for this trailer to get from our manufacturing facility to our port facility near Baytown TX (about 50 miles)." Thanks to Stephen for his contributions to the Community.  Better together is what it's about. 
View full tip
Check out this video on Creo Advanced Modeling Techniques from PTC Application Engineers Presenters: Lino Tozzi (Technical Specialist, Fellow) and Ryan Butcher (Technical Specialist, Fellow) Original Date Presented: February 8, 2022   (view in My Videos)
View full tip
Check out this video on Creo Reverse Engineering from PTC Application Engineers Presenters: Lino Tozzi (Technical Specialist, Fellow) and Ryan Butcher (Technical Specialist, Fellow) Original Date Presented: January 25, 2022   (view in My Videos)
View full tip
Multibody – Clearance & Creepage Analysis,   Hello all and welcome to another blog post in the multibody series.   In today’s topic I would like to make you aware of the multibody setup possibilities for clearance and creepage analysis. With the introduction of bodies in Creo Parametric 7.0, we also introduced support of the COMPARATIVE_TRACKING_INDEX parameter for bodies. If you add it to individual bodies of a part, you can define and control the conductivity definition separately for different bodies within a part. The attached video shows an example on a fuse part by defining conductive ends as body with a different CTI value. Once the body level parameter values are defined, you can see the conductive highlighting including the metallic ends of the fuse and excluding the red inner body. (view in My Videos)   Thanks for reading & watching.  I hope it was informative. If you liked it, give it a Kudo.   Back to Creo 7.0 & 8.0+ Multibody Home: Start Here!   Enjoy!....Martin  
View full tip
Check out this video on Creo Sheetmetal Design from PTC Application Engineers Presenters: Lino Tozzi (Technical Specialist, Fellow) and Tom Quaglia (Creo Segment Sales ). Original Date Presented: January 13, 2022. (view in My Videos)
View full tip