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Structure; balanced loads; suggested technique

Newbie

Structure; balanced loads; suggested technique

Need help finding an article I read in the past year or so.

It detailed a (two?) step process for measuring then applying loads
to a model so it's perfectly balanced in space. After the balanced
loads are applied to the model, a constraint is added to keep the
model from drifting in space. The constraint has minimal reaction force.

I believe it was a large backhoe arm if that helps jog memories.


Suggested technique?
Profiles magazine?

Anyone else remember reading this?

I really think it was a suggested technique in the PTC knowledge base,
but after many searches I've failed to find it.



Bruce Peterson
Great Plains Mfg.
Assaria, Ks 67416

p 785-667-7763 ext 3430
f 785-667-2695
http://www.greatplainsmfg.com
2 REPLIES 2

RE: Structure; balanced loads; suggested technique

Dear Bruce,

In Wildfire 3.0, use the inertia relief option on the analysis definition
form, which works a treat.

Otherwise, use the 'three-point' constraint method. Briefly:

Make three datum points on your model, well away from any stress
concentration and defining a plane of symmetry (if your model is symmetric).
It's best to make a co-ordinate system as well. Constrain the first point
(located at the origin) in all three translations. Then constrain the second
point in the translations except for the direction defined by points 1 to 2.
(If point 2 is on the x-axis X should be free.) The third point is
constrained to stop the model spinning about the axis created by points 1
and 2. So if point 3 is on the y-axis it should be constrained in the Z
direction.)

Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Rod
Highlighted

Re: Structure; balanced loads; suggested technique

Suggested Technique for Troubleshooting Insufficiently Constrained Models