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ptc-creo using curves and surfaces- units???

Regular Member

ptc-creo using curves and surfaces- units???

Trying to move into a bit more complex drawing. I started playing with the style-curves and surfaces options. After watching a few videos and experimenting with it, it seems like the way to go for making car bodies and such.

My question is, how do I get dimensions on any of these drawings? Annotations don't seem to be available. There's got to be some way to assign dimensions, or am I misunderstanding the whole reason for the style option.

I will attach a drawing for example.

Thanks

-Brett

3 REPLIES 3

Re: ptc-creo using curves and surfaces- units???

Try using points for creating control geometry.

Re: ptc-creo using curves and surfaces- units???

Antonius,

Thanks for responding. I'm not quite sure what you mean. Are you saying to set up points before I go into the style drawing and match to those?

So then, using straight style drawing there is no dimensioning? Is that true?

Thanks for considering.

-Brett

Re: ptc-creo using curves and surfaces- units???

I have not used the style extension but in general, you do not get real dimensions from surfaces. You might be able to pick up silhouettes for overall dimensions but the rest is more or less considered "freeform"

I am also not a great fan for how Creo manages splines and their resulting control geometry when it comes to drawings.

As for the points, I am considering adding them as drawing aids so you do have geometry that you can dimension. Normally, freeform parts would have some means to identify orientation often considered datum targets.

Once you get away from cylinders and flat planes or even sections that follow this line, Creo starts to get less comprehensive. Even ellipses tent to become unstable in sketches when you break them up.

I always have an eye on what I want to show in a drawing and use this as driving geometry. Section curves and orientation planes can be of great help in driving design intent.