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The following code is best practice when creating any "entity" in Thingworx service script.  When a new entity is created (like a Thing) it will be loaded into the JVM memory immediately, but is not committed to disk until a transaction (service) successfully completes.  For this reason ALL code in a service must be in a try/catch block to handle exceptions.  In order to rollback the create call the catch must call a delete for any entity created.  In line comments give further detail.     try {     var params = {         name: "NewThingName",         description: "This Is A New Thing",         thingTemplateName: "GenericThing"     };     Resources["EntityServices"].CreateThing(params);    // Always enable and restart a new thing to make it active on the Platform     Things["NewThingName"].Enable();     Things["NewThingName"].Restart();       //Now Create an Organization for the new Thing     var params = {         topOUName: "NewOrgName",         name: "NewOrgName",         description: "New Orgianization for new Thing",         topOUDescription: "New Org Main"     };     Resources["EntityServices"].CreateOrganization(params);       // Any code that could potentially cause an exception should     // also be included in the try-catch block. } catch (err) {     // If an exception is caught, we need to attempt to delete everything     // that was created to roll back the entire transaction.     // If we do not do this a "ghost" entity will remain in memory     // We must do this in reverse order of creation so there are no dependency conflicts     // We also do not know where it failed so we must attempt to remove all of them,     // but also handle exceptions in case they were not created       try {         var params = {name: "NewOrgName"};         Resources["EntityServices"].DeleteOrganization(params);     }     catch(ex2) {//Org was not created     }       try {         var params = {name: "NewThingName"};         Resources["EntityServices"].DeleteThing(params);     }     catch(ex2) {//Thing was not created     } }
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Analytics projects typically involve using the Analytics API rather than the Analytics Builder to accomplish different tasks. The attached documentation provides examples of code snippets that can be used to automate the most common analytics tasks on a project such as: Creating a dataset Training a Model Real time scoring predictive and prescriptive Retrieving the validation metrics for a model Appending additional data to a dataset Retraining the model The documentation also provides examples that are specific to time series datasets. The attached .zip file contains both the document as well as some entities that you need to import in ThingWorx to access the services provided in the examples. 
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Recently I needed to be able to parse and handle XML data natively inside of a ThingWorx script, and this XML file happened to have a SOAP namespace as well. I learned a few things along the way that I couldn’t find a lot of documentation on, so am sharing here.   Lessons Learned The biggest lesson I learned is that ThingWorx uses “E4X” XML handling. This is a language that Mozilla created as a way for JavaScript to handle XML (the full name is “ECMAscript for XML”). While Mozilla deprecated the language in 2014, Rhino, the JavaScript engine that ThingWorx uses on the server, still supports it, so ThingWorx does too. Here’s a tutorial on E4X - https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Archive/Web/E4X_tutorial The built-in linter in ThingWorx will complain about E4X syntax, but it still works. I learned how to get to the data I wanted and loop through to create an InfoTable. Hopefully this is what you want to do as well.   Selecting an Element and Iterating My data came inside of a SOAP envelope, which was meaningless information to me. I wanted to get down a few layers. Here’s a sample of my data that has made-up information in place of the customer's original data:                <SOAP-ENV : Envelope   xmlns : SOAP-ENV = "http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/"   headers = "" >     <SOAP-ENV : Body >         < get_part_schResponse   xmlns = "urn:schemas-iwaysoftware-com:iwse" >             < get_part_schResult >                 < get_part_schRow >                     < PART_NO > 123456 </ PART_NO >                     < ORD_PROC_DIV_CD > E </ ORD_PROC_DIV_CD >                     < MFG_DIV_CD > E </ MFG_DIV_CD >                     < SCHED_DT > 2020-01-01 </ SCHED_DT >                 </ get_part_schRow >                 < get_part_schRow >                     < PART_NO > 789456 </ PART_NO >                     < ORD_PROC_DIV_CD > E </ ORD_PROC_DIV_CD >                     < MFG_DIV_CD > E </ MFG_DIV_CD >                     < SCHED_DT > 2020-01-01 </ SCHED_DT >                 </ get_part_schRow >             </ get_part_schResult >         </ get_part_schResponse >     </SOAP-ENV : Body > </SOAP-ENV : Envelope > To get to the schRow data, I need to get past SOAP and into a few layers of XML. To do that, I make a new variable and use the E4X selections to get there: var   data  =  resultXML .*:: Body .*:: get_part_schResponse .*:: get_part_schResult .*; Note a few things: resultXML is a variable in the service that contains the XML data. I skipped the Envelope tag since that’s the root. The .* syntax does not mean “all the following”, it means “all namespaces”. You can define and specify the namespaces instead of using .*, but I didn’t find value in that. I found some sample code that theoretically should work on a VMware forum: https://communities.vmware.com/thread/592000. This gives me schRow as an XML List that I can iterate through. You can see what you have at this point by converting the data to a String and outputting it: var   result  =  String ( data ); Now that I am to the schRow data, I can use a for loop to add to an InfoTable: for   each  ( var   row   in   data ) {      result . AddRow ({         PartNumber:   row .*:: PART_NO ,         OrderProcessingDivCD:   row .*:: ORD_PROC_DIV_CD ,         ManufacturingDivCD:   row .*:: MFG_DIV_CD ,         ScheduledDate:   row .*:: SCHED_DT     }); } Shoo! That’s it! Data into an InfoTable! Next time, I'll ask for a JSON API. 😊
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In ThingWorx Analytics, you have the possibility to use an external model for scoring. In this written tutorial, I would like to provide an overview of how you can use a model developed in Python, using the scikit-learn library in ThingWorx Analytics. The provided attachment contains an archive with the following files: iris_data.csv: A dataset for pattern recognition that has a categorical goal. You can click here to read more about this dataset TestRFToPmml.ipynb: A Jupyter notebook file with the source code for the Python model as well as the steps to export it to PMML RF_Iris.pmml: The PMML file with the model that you can directly upload in Analytics without going through the steps of training the model in Python The tutorial assumes you already have some knowledge of ThingWorx and ThingWorx Analytics. Also, if you plan to run the Python code and train the model yourself, you need to have Jupyter notebook installed (I used the one from the Anaconda distribution). For demonstration purposes, I have created a very simple random forest model in Python. To convert the model to PMML, I have used the sklearn2pmml library. Because ThingWorx Analytics supports PMML format 4.3, you need to install sklearn2pmml version 0.56.2 (the highest version that supports PMML 4.3). To read more about this library, please click here Furthermore, to use your model with the older version of the sklearn2pmml, I have installed scikit-learn version 0.23.2.  You will find the commands to install the two libraries in the first two cells of the notebook.   Code Walkthrough The first step is to import the required libraries (please note that pandas library is also required to transform the .csv to a Dataframe object):   import pandas from sklearn.ensemble import RandomForestClassifier from sklearn2pmml import sklearn2pmml from sklearn.model_selection import GridSearchCV from sklearn2pmml.pipeline import PMMLPipeline   After importing the required libraries, we convert the iris_data.csv to a pandas dataframe and then create the features (X) as well as the goal (Y) vectors:   iris_df = pandas.read_csv("iris_data.csv") iris_X = iris_df[iris_df.columns.difference(["class"])] iris_y = iris_df["class"]   To best tune the random forest, we will use the GridSearchCSV and cross-validation. We want to test what parameters have the best validation metrics and for this, we will use a utility function that will print the results:   def print_results(results): print('BEST PARAMS: {}\n'.format(results.best_params_)) means = results.cv_results_['mean_test_score'] stds = results.cv_results_['std_test_score'] for mean, std, params in zip(means, stds, results.cv_results_['params']): print('{} (+/-{}) for {}'.format(round(mean, 3), round(std * 2, 3), params))   We create the random forest model and train it with different numbers of estimators and maximum depth. We will then call the previous function to compare the results for the different parameters:   rf = RandomForestClassifier() parameters = { 'n_estimators': [5, 50, 250], 'max_depth': [2, 4, 8, 16, 32, None] } cv = GridSearchCV(rf, parameters, cv=5) cv.fit(iris_X, iris_y) print_results(cv)   To convert the model to a PMML file, we need to create a PMMLPipeline object, in which we pass the RandomForestClassifier with the tuning parameters we identified in the previous step (please note that in your case, the parameters can be different than in my example). You can check the sklearn2pmml  documentation  to see other examples for creating this PMMLPipeline object :   pipeline = PMMLPipeline([ ("classifier", RandomForestClassifier(max_depth=4,n_estimators=5)) ]) pipeline.fit(iris_X, iris_y)   Then we perform the export:   sklearn2pmml(pipeline, "RF_Iris.pmml", with_repr = True)   The model has now been exported as a PMML file in the same folder as the Jupyter Notebook file and we can upload it to ThingWorx Analytics.   Uploading and Exploring the PMML in Analytics To upload and use the model for scoring, there are two steps that you need to do: First, the PMML file needs to be uploaded to a ThingWorx File Repository Then, go to your Analytics Results thing (the name should be YourAnalyticsGateway_ResultsThing) and execute the service UploadModelFromRepository. Here you will need to specify the repository name and path for your PMML file, as well as a name for your model (and optionally a description)   If everything goes well, the result of the service will be an id. You can save this id to a separate file because you will use it later on. You can verify the status of this model and if it’s ready to use by executing the service GetDetails:   Assuming you want to use the PMML for scoring, but you were not the one to develop the model, maybe you don’t know what the expected inputs and the output of the model are. There are two services that can help you with this: QueryInputFields – to verify the fields expected as input parameters for a scoring job   QueryOutputFields – to verify the expected output of the model The resultType input parameter can be either MODELS or CLUSTERS, depending on the type of model,    Using the PMML for Scoring With all this information at hand, we are now ready to use this PMML for real-time scoring. In a Thing of your choice, define a service to test out the scoring for the PMML we have just uploaded. Create a new service with an infotable as the output (don’t add a datashape). The input data for scoring will be hardcoded in the service, but you can also add it as service input parameters and pass them via a Mashup or from another source. The script will be as follows:   // Values: INFOTABLE dataShape: "" let datasetRef = DataShapes["AnalyticsDatasetRef"].CreateValues(); // Values: INFOTABLE dataShape: "" let data = DataShapes["IrisData"].CreateValues(); data.AddRow({ sepal_length: 2.7, sepal_width: 3.1, petal_length: 2.1, petal_width: 0.4 }); datasetRef.AddRow({ data: data}); // predictiveScores: INFOTABLE dataShape: "" let result = Things["AnalyticsServer_PredictionThing"].RealtimeScore({ modelUri: "results:/models/" + "97471e07-137a-41bb-9f29-f43f107bf9ca", //replace with your own id datasetRef: datasetRef /* INFOTABLE */, });   Once you execute the service, the output should look like this (as we would have expected, according to the output fields in the PMML model):   As you have seen, it is easy to use a model built in Python in ThingWorx Analytics. Please note that you may use it only for scoring, and the model will not appear in Analytics Builder since you have created it on a different platform. If you have any questions about this brief written tutorial, let me know.
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Here is a tutorial to explain the process of uploading a PMML file from an external system to Thingworx Analytics. The tutorial steps are explained in the attached PDF and all referenced files can be found in the attached ZIP.  
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I recently had a customer who wanted to run services on ThingWorx from Power BI to retrieve existing operational data, and we were a bit stumped on how to pass the API key over in the headers, so I did a bit of Googling and pieced together the solution. It's not quite intuitive on the Power BI side, so I thought it would be helpful to share. If you have any other experience with integrating ThingWorx with Power BI, feel free to add a comment.    Prepare ThingWorx Create an Application Key that has Run Time execution access to the services you need. Understand the inputs needed for the service you would like. I'll have examples of none, one, an InfoTable, and multiple inputs.   Power BI Following the following steps in Power BI: 1. In Power BI, create a new blank query   2. On the left, right click on Query1 and go to the Advanced Editor:   3. Replace all of the body content with the following, replacing your API key, appropriate end point, and base URL as needed (this is an example with NO input parameters, I'll follow with examples of other parameters):     let appKey = "your-application-key-here", endpoint = "Things/YourThingNameHere/Services/YourServiceNameHere", baseUrl = "https://YourServerNameHere/Thingworx/", url = Text.Combine({baseUrl,endpoint}), body = "", request = Web.Contents( url, [ Headers = [ appKey = appKey, #"Content-Type" = "application/json", Accept = "application/json" ], Content = Text.ToBinary(body) ] ), Source = Json.Document(request) in Source       4. Click "Done", and now you'll have a warning about how to connect. Click the "Edit Credentials" button. 5. Leave it on Anonymous and click "Connect":   6. You should now see the return data coming from ThingWorx.   Note that I had a little trouble with this authentication initially and it saved the wrong method. To clear that out, go to the ribbon bar item "Data source settings" and select the server and clear it out.   Other Examples Here is an example for sending a single string parameter:   let appKey = "your-application-key-here", endpoint = "Things/YourThingNameHere/Services/YourServiceNameHere", baseUrl = "https://YourServerNameHere/Thingworx/", url = Text.Combine({baseUrl,endpoint}), body = "{""InputParameter"": ""InputValue""}", request = Web.Contents( url, [ Headers = [ appKey = appKey, #"Content-Type" = "application/json", Accept = "application/json" ], Content = Text.ToBinary(body) ] ), Source = Json.Document(request) in Source     Here's an example of sending a string and an integer: let appKey = "your-application-key-here", endpoint = "Things/YourThingNameHere/Services/YourServiceNameHere", baseUrl = "https://YourServerNameHere/Thingworx/", url = Text.Combine({baseUrl,endpoint}), body = "{""InputString"": ""Hello, world!"", ""InputNumber"" : 42}", request = Web.Contents( url, [ Headers = [ appKey = appKey, #"Content-Type" = "application/json", Accept = "application/json" ], Content = Text.ToBinary(body) ] ), Source = Json.Document(request) in Source   Here is an example for sending an InfoTable. Note that you must supply the dataShape with fieldDefinitions. If you're using an existing Data Shape, you can get the JSON by using the service  GetDataShapeMetadataAsJSON() that is on the data shape.     let appKey = "your-application-key-here", endpoint = "Things/YourThingNameHere/Services/YourServiceNameHere", baseUrl = "https://YourServerNameHere/Thingworx/", url = Text.Combine({baseUrl,endpoint}), body = "{""propertyNames"": { ""rows"": [ { ""name"": ""FirstEntityName"", ""description"": ""The first entity"" }, { ""name"": ""SecondEntityName"", ""description"": ""The second entity"" }], ""dataShape"": { ""fieldDefinitions"": { ""name"": { ""name"": ""name"", ""aspects"": { ""isPrimaryKey"": true }, ""description"": ""Entity name"", ""baseType"": ""STRING"", ""ordinal"": 0 }, ""description"": { ""name"": ""description"", ""aspects"": {}, ""description"": ""Entity description"", ""baseType"": ""STRING"", ""ordinal"": 0 } } } }}", request = Web.Contents( url, [ Headers = [ appKey = appKey, #"Content-Type" = "application/json", Accept = "application/json" ], Content = Text.ToBinary(body) ] ), Source = Json.Document(request) in Source       If I find any more interesting ways to use Power BI with ThingWorx services, I'll add them on here.  
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This post covers how to build and operationalize a time series model using Thingworx Analytics. A lookback window is used to read multiple previous rows before the current one, and base the prediction on those lookback rows.   In this example we use time series data to predict water flow for different water pumps in a system.   There is a full explanation of the method attached, also all necessary resources are included in the attached files.
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This example provides the ability to generate a simple entity structure and some historical data for each entity. Historical data is run through a ThingWorx service to generate histogram data for display in a bar chart.  The provided ThingWorx entities and PDF document provide the example as well as documentation.
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Welcome to the Thingworx Community area for code examples and sharing.   We have a few how-to items and basic guidelines for posting content in this space.  The Jive platform the our community runs on provides some tools for posting and highlighting code in the document format that this area is based on.  Please try to follow these settings to make the area easy to use, read and follow.   At the top of your new document please give a brief description of the code sample that you are posting. Use the code formatting tool provided for all parts of code samples (including if there are multiple in one post). Try your best to put comments in the code to describe behavior where needed. You can edit documents, but note each time you save them a new version is created.  You can delete old versions if needed. You may add comments to others code documents and modify your own code samples based on comments. If you have alternative ways to accomplish the same as an existing code sample please post it to the comments. We encourage everyone to add alternatives noted in comments to the main post/document.   Format code: The double blue arrows allow you to select the type of code being inserted and will do key word highlighting as well as add line numbers for reference and discussions.
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With ThingWorx, we can already use univariate anomaly alerts (on a single sensor value). However, in many situations, the readings from an individual sensor may not tell you much about the overall issue and a multivariate anomaly detector can be more useful. This post is intended to provide an overview of the Azure Anomaly Detector and how it can be integrated with ThingWorx. The attachment contains: A document with detailed instructions about the setup; A .csv file with the multivariate timeseries dataset; A .twx file with some entities that need to be imported in ThingWorx as well as the CSVParser extension that needs to be installed; A .zip file that will need to uploaded in an Azure Blob Container at some point in the setup
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If you ever tested mashup rendering on mobile phones, you probably experienced that the mashup was not sizing to fit your mobile display. This "MobileHeader" extension enables to auto adapt the mashup to mobile displays.   It adds the following parameters to the HTML header: <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0, maximum-scale=1.0, user-scalable=0"> <meta name="apple-mobile-web-app-capable" content="yes"> <meta name="apple-mobile-web-app-status-bar-style" content="black-translucent">   In the composer just drop the "MobileHeader" extension into a section of the mashup.   This extension was tested until version 7.4.
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Disclaimer: example was provided by Hatcher Chad - chad@onfarmsystems.com   //   // For this example, we'll have an Math service   // which takes two numbers, and an operation.   // The result will be that operation performed on the two inputs.       //   // We either need an Application Key,   // or user credentials to perform the reads and writes.   // App keys are a little safer.   // In this demo, we'll store it on the Entity as a Property.   var appKey = me.appKey;       //   // The service name needs to be unique and not already in use.   var serviceName = "MyMath";       //   // What are the inputs to the service?   // We'll define them nicely here, but manipulate this object later.   var parameters = {   "op" : "STRING",   "x" : "NUMBER",   "y" : "NUMBER"   };       //   // What datatype does the service return?   // If it's an infotable,   // then you'll also have to specify the data shape   // as part of the resultType's aspect,   // but I won't demonstrate that here.   var output = "NUMBER";       //   // What is the actual service script?   // We'll define it here as an array of lines, and then join them together.   var serviceScript = [   "var result = (function() {",   " switch(op) {",   " case \"add\": return x + y;",   " case \"sub\": return x - y;",   " case \"mult\": return x * y;",   " case \"div\": return x / y;",   " default: return op in Math ? Math[op](x, y) : 0;",   " };",   "})();",   ].join("\n");       ////////       //   // Let's convert the friendly parameter definition   // into the structure that ThingWorx uses:   var parameterDefinitions = Object.keys(parameters).reduce(function(parameterDefinitions, parameterName, index) {   var parameterType = parameters[parameterName];   parameterDefinitions[parameterName] = {   "name": parameterName,   "aspects": {},   "description": "",   "baseType": parameterType,   "ordinal": index   };   return parameterDefinitions;   }, {});       //   // Now let's set up our service definition and implementation.   var definition = {   "isAllowOverride": false,   "isOpen": false,   "sourceType": "Unknown",   "parameterDefinitions": parameterDefinitions,   "name": serviceName,   "aspects": {   "isAsync": false   },   "isLocalOnly": false,   "description": "",   "isPrivate": false,   "sourceName": "",   "category": "",   "resultType": {   "name": "result",   "aspects": {},   "description": "",   "baseType": output,   "ordinal": 0   }   };       var implementation = {   "name": serviceName,   "description": "",   "handlerName": "Script",   "configurationTables": {   "Script": {   "isMultiRow": false,   "name": "Script",   "description": "Script",   "rows": [{   "code": serviceScript   }],   "ordinal": 0,   "dataShape": {   "fieldDefinitions": {   "code": {   "name": "code",   "aspects": {},   "description": "code",   "baseType": "STRING",   "ordinal": 0   }   }   }   }   }   };       ////////       //   // Here are the URLs we'll need in order to make updates.   // You can change the thing name ('ServiceModifier' here)   // to something else.   // If you use credentials instead of an app key,   // then you can remove the appKey parameter here,   // but you'll have to add the username and password   // to the two ContentLoaderFunctions calls.   var url = {   export : " http://127.0.0.1:8080/Thingworx/Things/ServiceModifier?Accept=application/json&appKey= "+appKey,   import : " http://127.0.0.1:8080/Thingworx/Things/ServiceModifier?appKey= "+appKey   };       //   // We can download the entity to modify as a JSON object.   // Older versions of ThingWorx might not support this.   var config = Resources.ContentLoaderFunctions.GetJSON({   url : url.export,   });       //   // We have to modify both the 'effectiveShape',   // as well as the 'thingShape'.   config.effectiveShape.serviceDefinitions[serviceName] = definition;   config.effectiveShape.serviceImplementations[serviceName] = implementation;       config.thingShape.serviceDefinitions[serviceName] = definition;   config.thingShape.serviceImplementations[serviceName] = implementation;       // Finally, we can push our updates back into ThingWorx.   Resources.ContentLoaderFunctions.PutText({   url : url.export,   content : JSON.stringify(config),   contentType : "application/json",   });       // The end.
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Super simple widget that embeds the HTML5 audio tag, allowing MP3 files to be played and/or triggers by another mashup event.
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Distributed Timer and Scheduler Execution in a ThingWorx High Availability (HA) Cluster Written by Desheng Xu and edited by Mike Jasperson    Overview Starting with the 9.0 release, ThingWorx supports an “active-active” high availability (or HA) configuration, with multiple nodes providing redundancy in the event of hardware failures as well as horizontal scalability for workloads that can be distributed across the cluster.   In this architecture, one of the ThingWorx nodes is elected as the “singleton” (or lead) node of the cluster.  This node is responsible for managing the execution of all events triggered by timers or schedulers – they are not distributed across the cluster.   This design has proved challenging for some implementations as it presents a potential for a ThingWorx application to generate imbalanced workload if complex timers and schedulers are needed.   However, your ThingWorx applications can overcome this limitation, and still use timers and schedulers to trigger workloads that will distribute across the cluster.  This article will demonstrate both how to reproduce this imbalanced workload scenario, and the approach you can take to overcome it.   Demonstration Setup   For purposes of this demonstration, a two-node ThingWorx cluster was used, similar to the deployment diagram below:   Demonstrating Event Workload on the Singleton Node   Imagine this simple scenario: You have a list of vendors, and you need to process some logic for one of them at random every few seconds.   First, we will create a timer in ThingWorx to trigger an event – in this example, every 5 seconds.     Next, we will create a helper utility that has a task that will randomly select one of the vendors and process some logic for it – in this case, we will simply log the selected vendor in the ThingWorx ScriptLog.     Finally, we will subscribe to the timer event, and call the helper utility:     Now with that code in place, let's check where these services are being executed in the ScriptLog.     Look at the PlatformID column in the log… notice that that the Timer and the helper utility are always running on the same node – in this case Platform2 , which is the current singleton node in the cluster.   As the complexity of your helper utility increases, you can imagine how workload will become unbalanced, with the singleton node handling the bulk of this timer-driven workload in addition to the other workloads being spread across the cluster.   This workload can be distributed across multiple cluster nodes, but a little more effort is needed to make it happen.   Timers that Distribute Tasks Across Multiple ThingWorx HA Cluster Nodes   This time let’s update our subscription code – using the PostJSON service from the ContentLoader entity to send the service requests to the cluster entry point instead of running them locally.       const headers = { "Content-Type": "application/json", "Accept": "application/json", "appKey": "INSERT-YOUR-APPKEY-HERE" }; const url = "https://testcluster.edc.ptc.io/Thingworx/Things/DistributeTaskDemo_HelperThing/services/TimerBackend_Service"; let result = Resources["ContentLoaderFunctions"].PostJSON({ proxyScheme: undefined /* STRING */, headers: headers /* JSON */, ignoreSSLErrors: undefined /* BOOLEAN */, useNTLM: undefined /* BOOLEAN */, workstation: undefined /* STRING */, useProxy: undefined /* BOOLEAN */, withCookies: undefined /* BOOLEAN */, proxyHost: undefined /* STRING */, url: url /* STRING */, content: {} /* JSON */, timeout: undefined /* NUMBER */, proxyPort: undefined /* INTEGER */, password: undefined /* STRING */, domain: undefined /* STRING */, username: undefined /* STRING */ });   Note that the URL used in this example - https://testcluster.edc.ptc.io/Thingworx - is the entry point of the ThingWorx cluster.  Replace this value to match with your cluster’s entry point if you want to duplicate this in your own cluster.   Now, let's check the result again.   Notice that the helper utility TimerBackend_Service is now running on both cluster nodes, Platform1 and Platform2.   Is this Magic?  No!  What is Happening Here?   The timer or scheduler itself is still being executed on the singleton node, but now instead of the triggering the helper utility locally, the PostJSON  service call from the subscription is being routed back to the cluster entry point – the load balancer.  As a result, the request is routed (usually round-robin) to any available cluster nodes that are behind the load balancer and reporting as healthy.   Usually, the load balancer will be configured to have a cookie-based affinity - the load balancer will route the request to the node that has the same cookie value as the request.  Since this PostJSON  service call is a RESTful call, any cookie value associated with the response will not be attached to the next request.  As a result, the cookie-based affinity will not impact the round-robin routing in this case.   Considerations to Use this Approach   Authentication: As illustrated in the demo, make sure to use an Application Key with an appropriate user assigned in the header. You could alternatively use username/password or a token to authenticate the request, but this could be less ideal from a security perspective.   App Deployment: The hostname in the URL must match the hostname of the cluster entry point.  As the URL of your implementation is now part of your code, if deploy this code from one ThingWorx instance to another, you would need to modify the hostname/port/protocol in the URL.   Consider creating a variable in the helper utility which holds the hostname/port/protocol value, making it easier to modify during deployment.   Firewall Rules: If your load balancer has firewall rules which limit the traffic to specific known IP addresses, you will need to determine which IP addresses will be used when a service is invoked from each of the ThingWorx cluster nodes, and then configure the load balancer to allow the traffic from each of these public IP address.   Alternatively, you could configure an internal IP address endpoint for the load balancer and use the local /etc/hosts name resolution of each ThingWorx node to point to the internal load balancer IP, or register this internal IP in an internal DNS as the cluster entry point.
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Those who have been working with ThingWorx for many years will have noticed the work done around ingress stress testing and performance optimization.  Adding InfluxDB as a time-series data persistence provider really helped level up these capabilities while simultaneously decreasing the overall resources required by the infrastructure.  However with this ease comes a hidden challenge: query and data processing performance to work it into something useful.   Often It's Too Much Data In general most customers that I work with want to collect far too much data -- without knowing what it will be used for, or what processing will be required in order to make it usable and useful.  This is a trap in general with how many people envision IoT projects, being told by infrastructure providers that cloud storage and compute resources are abundant and cheap and that they should get as much data as possible.  This buildup of data means that more effort needs to be spent working it into something useful (data engineering/feature extraction) and addressing common data issues (quality, gaps, precision, etc.).  This might be fine for mature companies with large data analytics teams; however this is a makeup that I've only seen in the largest of our customers.  Some advice - figure out what you need and how you'll use it, and then collect that.  Work on extracting value today rather than hoping that extra data collected  now will provide some insights years from now.   Example - Problem Statement You got your Thing Model designed, and edge devices connected.  Now you've got data flowing in and being stored every 5 seconds in InfluxDB.  Great progress!  Now on to building the applications which cover the various use cases. The raw data is most likely going to need to be processed and potentially even significantly transformed into other information in order to make it useful.  Turning a "powered on and running" BOOLEAN to an "hour meter" INTEGER is a simple example.  Then you may need to provide a report showing equipment run time hours by day over a month.  The maintenance team may also have asked to look for usage patterns which lead to breakdowns, requiring extracting other data points from the initial one like number of daily starts, average daily run time, average time between restarts. The problem here is that unless you have prepared these new data points and stored them as well (say in a Stream), you are going to have to build these data sets on the fly, and that can be time and resource intensive and not give you the response time expected.  As you can imagine, repeatedly querying and processing large volumes of unchanging raw data is going to have resource and time implications - so this is why data collection and data use need to be thought about separately.   Data Engineering In the above examples, the key is actually creating new data points which are calculated progressively throughout normal operation.  This not only makes the information that you want available when you need it - in the right format - but it also significantly reduces resource requirements by constantly reprocessing raw data.  It also helps managing data purging, because as you create and store usable insights, you can eventually just archive away your old raw data streams.   Direct Database Queries vs. Thingworx Data Services Despite the above being a rule of thumb, sometimes a simple well structured database query can get you exactly what you need and do so quite quickly.  This is especially true for InfluxDB when working with extremely large time-series datasets.  The challenge here is that ThingWorx persistence providers abstract away the complexity of writing ones own database queries, so we can't easily get at the databases raw power and are forced to query back more data than needed and work it into a usable format in memory (which is not fast).   Leveraging the InfluxDB API using the ContentLoader Technique As InfluxDBs API is 100% REST, we can access it using in-built ThingWorx Content Loader services.  Check out this demonstration and explanation video where I talk about how to interact directly with InfluxDB in order to crush massive time-series data and get back much more usable and manageable data sets.  It is important to note here that you should use a read-only database user here, as you should never modify the ThingWorx databases to avoid untested scenarios which may lead to data corruption.   Optimizing ThingWorx query performance with the InfluxDB REST API - YouTube InfluxToolBox ThingWorx demo project (by T. Wobben)      
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I've had a lot of questions over the years working with Azure IoT, Kepware, and ThingWorx that I really struggled getting answers to. I was always grateful when someone took the time to help me understand, and now it is time to repay the favour.   People ask me many things about Azure (in a ThingWorx context), and one of the common ones has been about MQTT communications from Kepware to ThingWorx using IoT Hub. Recently the topic has come up again as more and more of the ThingWorx expert community start to work with Azure IoT. Today, I took the time to build, test, validate, and share an approach and utilities to do this in cases where the Azure Industrial IoT OPC UA integration is overkill or simply a step later in the project plan. Enjoy!   End to end Integration of Kepware to ThingWorx using MQTT over Azure IoT (YoutTube 45 minute deep-dive)   ThingWorx entities for import (ThingWorx 9.0)   This approach can be quite good for a simple demo if you have a Kepware Integrator or Kepware Enterprise license, but the use of IoT Gateway for many servers and tags can be quite costly.   Those looking to leverage Azure IoT Hub for MQTT integration to ThingWorx would likely also find this recorded session and shared utilities quite helpful.   Cheers, Greg
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The AddStreamEntries​ snippet does not offer too much information, except that it needs an InfoTable as input. It is however based on the InfoTable for the AddStreamEntity service.     To use the AddStreamEntries table, an InfoTable based on sourceType, values, location, source, timestamp​ and ​tags​ must be used.   In this example, I started with a new Thing based on a ​Stream​ template and the following DataShape:     This DataShape must be converted into an InfoTable with is used as the ​values​ parameter. It's important that the ​timestamp​ parameter has distinct values! Otherwise values matching the same timestamp will be overwritten!   We don't really need the sourceType​ as ThingWorx will automatically determine the type by knowing the source and which kind of Entity Type it is.   I created a new ​MyStreamThing​ with a new service, filling the InfoTable and the Stream. The result is the following code which will add 5 rows to the Stream:     // *** SET UP META DATA FOR INFO TABLE ***   // create a new InfoTable based on AddStreamEntries parameters (timestamp, location, source, sourceType, tags, values)   var myInfoTable = { dataShape: { fieldDefinitions : {} }, rows: [] };   myInfoTable.dataShape.fieldDefinitions['timestamp']  = { name: 'timestamp', baseType: 'DATETIME' }; myInfoTable.dataShape.fieldDefinitions['location']  = { name: 'location', baseType: 'LOCATION' }; myInfoTable.dataShape.fieldDefinitions['source']    = { name: 'source', baseType: 'STRING' }; myInfoTable.dataShape.fieldDefinitions['sourceType'] = { name: 'sourceType', baseType: 'STRING' }; myInfoTable.dataShape.fieldDefinitions['tags']      = { name: 'tags', baseType: 'TAGS' }; myInfoTable.dataShape.fieldDefinitions['values']    = { name: 'values', baseType: 'INFOTABLE' };   // *** SET UP ACTUAL VALUES FOR INFO TABLE ***   // create new meta data   var tags = new Array(); var timestamp = new Date(); var location = new Object(); location.latitude = 0; location.longitude = 0; location.elevation = 0; location.units = "WGS84";   // add rows to InfoTable (~5 times)   for (i=0; i<5; i++) {       // create new values based on Stream DataShape       var params = {           infoTableName : "InfoTable",           dataShapeName : "Cxx-DS"     };       var values = Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(params);       // add something to the values to make them unique       // create and add new row based on Stream DataShape     // only a single line allowed!       var newValues = new Object();     newValues.a = "aaa" + i; // STRING - isPrimaryKey = true     newValues.b = "bbb" + i; // STRING     newValues.c = "ccc" + i; // STRING       values.AddRow(newValues);       // create new InfoTable row based on meta data & values     // add 10 ms to each object, to make it's timestamp unique     // otherwise entries with the same timestamp will be overwritten       var newEntry = new Object();     newEntry.timestamp = new Date(Date.now() + (i * 10));     newEntry.location = location;     newEntry.source = me.name;     newEntry.tags = tags;     newEntry.values = values;       // add new Info Table row to Info Table           myInfoTable.rows = newEntry;       }       // *** ADD myInfoTable (HOLDING MULITPLE STREAM ENTRIES) TO STREAM       // add stream entries in the InfoTable       var params = {           values: myInfoTable /* INFOTABLE */     };       // no return       Things["MyStreamThing"].AddStreamEntries(params);   To verify the values have been added correctly, call the ​GetStreamEntriesWithData​ service on the ​MyStreamThing​
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It usually happens that we need to copy a large file to ThingWorx server periodically, and what's worse, the big file is changing(like a log file). This sample give a simpler way to implement. The main idea in the sample is: 1. Lower the management burden from ThingWorx server and instead it put all the work in edge SDK side 2. Save network burden with only uploading the incremented file and append it to the older file on ThingWorx server   Java SDK version in this sample: 6.0.1-255
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This simple example creates an infotable of hierarchical data from an existing datashape that can be used in a tree or D3 Tree widget.  Attachments are provides that give a PDF document as well as the ThingWorx entities for the example.  If you were just interested in the service code, it is listed below: var params = {   infoTableName : "InfoTable",   dataShapeName : "TreeDataShape" }; // CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(infoTableName:STRING("InfoTable"), dataShapeName:STRING):INFOTABLE(TreeDataShape) var result = Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(params); var NewRow = {}; NewRow.Parent = "No Parent"; NewRow.Child = "Enterprise"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Enterprise"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Enterprise"; NewRow.Child = "Site1"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Wilmington Plant"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line1"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Blow Molding"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1.Line1"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line1.Asset1"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Preform Staging"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1.Line1"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line1.Asset2"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Blow Molder"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1.Line1"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line1.Asset3"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Bottle Unscrambler"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line2"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Filling"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1.Line2"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line2.Asset1"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Rinser"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1.Line2"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line2.Asset2"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Filler"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1.Line2"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line2.Asset3"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Capper"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line3"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Packaging"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1.Line3"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line3.Asset1"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Printer Labeler"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1.Line3"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line3.Asset2"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Packer"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1.Line3"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line3.Asset3"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Palletizing"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Enterprise"; NewRow.Child = "Site2"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Mobile Plant"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line1"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Blow Molding"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2.Line1"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line1.Asset1"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Preform Staging"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2.Line1"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line1.Asset2"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Blow Molder"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2.Line1"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line1.Asset3"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Bottle Unscrambler"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line2"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Filling"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2.Line2"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line2.Asset1"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Rinser"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2.Line2"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line2.Asset2"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Filler"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2.Line2"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line2.Asset3"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Capper"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line3"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Packaging"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2.Line3"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line3.Asset1"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Printer Labeler"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2.Line3"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line3.Asset2"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Packer"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2.Line3"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line3.Asset3"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Palletizing"; result.AddRow(NewRow);
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This Javascript snippet creates a random value between those limits:   var dbl_Value = Math.floor(Math.random()*(max-min+1)+min);
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For a recent project, I was needing to find all of the children in a Network Hierarchy of a particular template type... so I put together a little script that I thought I'd share. Maybe this will be useful to others as well.   In my situation, this script lived in the Location template. This was useful so that I could find all the Sensor Things under any particular node, no matter how deep they are.   For example, given a network like this: Location 1 Sensor 1 Location 1A Sensor 2 Sensor 3 Location 1AA Sensor 4 Location 1B Sensor 5 If you run this service in Location 1, you'll get an InfoTable with these Things: Sensor 1 Sensor 2 Sensor 3 Sensor 4 Sensor 5 From Location 1A: Sensor 2 Sensor 3 Sensor 4 From Location 1AA: Sensor 4 From Location 1B: Sensor 5   For this service, these are the inputs/outputs: Inputs: none Output: InfoTable of type NetworkConnection   // CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(infoTableName:STRING("InfoTable"), dataShapeName:STRING):INFOTABLE(AlertSummary) let result = Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].CreateInfoTableFromDataShape({ infoTableName : "InfoTable", dataShapeName : "NetworkConnection" }); // since the hierarchy could contain locations or sensors, need to recursively loop down to get all the sensors function findChildrenSensors(thingName) { let childrenThings = Networks["Hierarchy_NW"].GetChildConnections({ name: thingName /* STRING */ }); for each (var row in childrenThings.rows) { // row.to has the name of the child Thing if (Things[row.to].IsDerivedFromTemplate({thingTemplateName: "Location_TT"})) { findChildrenSensors(row.to); } else if (Things[row.to].IsDerivedFromTemplate({thingTemplateName: "Sensor_TT"})) { result.AddRow(row); } } } findChildrenSensors(me.name);    
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