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The following code is best practice when creating any "entity" in Thingworx service script.  When a new entity is created (like a Thing) it will be loaded into the JVM memory immediately, but is not committed to disk until a transaction (service) successfully completes.  For this reason ALL code in a service must be in a try/catch block to handle exceptions.  In order to rollback the create call the catch must call a delete for any entity created.  In line comments give further detail.     try {     var params = {         name: "NewThingName",         description: "This Is A New Thing",         thingTemplateName: "GenericThing"     };     Resources["EntityServices"].CreateThing(params);    // Always enable and restart a new thing to make it active on the Platform     Things["NewThingName"].Enable();     Things["NewThingName"].Restart();       //Now Create an Organization for the new Thing     var params = {         topOUName: "NewOrgName",         name: "NewOrgName",         description: "New Orgianization for new Thing",         topOUDescription: "New Org Main"     };     Resources["EntityServices"].CreateOrganization(params);       // Any code that could potentially cause an exception should     // also be included in the try-catch block. } catch (err) {     // If an exception is caught, we need to attempt to delete everything     // that was created to roll back the entire transaction.     // If we do not do this a "ghost" entity will remain in memory     // We must do this in reverse order of creation so there are no dependency conflicts     // We also do not know where it failed so we must attempt to remove all of them,     // but also handle exceptions in case they were not created       try {         var params = {name: "NewOrgName"};         Resources["EntityServices"].DeleteOrganization(params);     }     catch(ex2) {//Org was not created     }       try {         var params = {name: "NewThingName"};         Resources["EntityServices"].DeleteThing(params);     }     catch(ex2) {//Thing was not created     } }
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This is using the simplest structure to do a look through an infotable.  It's simple but it avoids having to use row indexes and cleans up the code for readability as well.   //Assume incoming Infotable parameter names "thingList" for each (row in thingList.rows) {      // Now each row is already assigned to the row variable in the loop      var thingName = row.name; }   You can also nest these loops (just use a different variable from "row").  Also important to note to not add or remove row entries of the Infotable inside the loop.  In this case you may end up skipping or repeating rows in the loop since the indexes will be changed.
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The AddStreamEntries​ snippet does not offer too much information, except that it needs an InfoTable as input. It is however based on the InfoTable for the AddStreamEntity service.     To use the AddStreamEntries table, an InfoTable based on sourceType, values, location, source, timestamp​ and ​tags​ must be used.   In this example, I started with a new Thing based on a ​Stream​ template and the following DataShape:     This DataShape must be converted into an InfoTable with is used as the ​values​ parameter. It's important that the ​timestamp​ parameter has distinct values! Otherwise values matching the same timestamp will be overwritten!   We don't really need the sourceType​ as ThingWorx will automatically determine the type by knowing the source and which kind of Entity Type it is.   I created a new ​MyStreamThing​ with a new service, filling the InfoTable and the Stream. The result is the following code which will add 5 rows to the Stream:     // *** SET UP META DATA FOR INFO TABLE ***   // create a new InfoTable based on AddStreamEntries parameters (timestamp, location, source, sourceType, tags, values)   var myInfoTable = { dataShape: { fieldDefinitions : {} }, rows: [] };   myInfoTable.dataShape.fieldDefinitions['timestamp']  = { name: 'timestamp', baseType: 'DATETIME' }; myInfoTable.dataShape.fieldDefinitions['location']  = { name: 'location', baseType: 'LOCATION' }; myInfoTable.dataShape.fieldDefinitions['source']    = { name: 'source', baseType: 'STRING' }; myInfoTable.dataShape.fieldDefinitions['sourceType'] = { name: 'sourceType', baseType: 'STRING' }; myInfoTable.dataShape.fieldDefinitions['tags']      = { name: 'tags', baseType: 'TAGS' }; myInfoTable.dataShape.fieldDefinitions['values']    = { name: 'values', baseType: 'INFOTABLE' };   // *** SET UP ACTUAL VALUES FOR INFO TABLE ***   // create new meta data   var tags = new Array(); var timestamp = new Date(); var location = new Object(); location.latitude = 0; location.longitude = 0; location.elevation = 0; location.units = "WGS84";   // add rows to InfoTable (~5 times)   for (i=0; i<5; i++) {       // create new values based on Stream DataShape       var params = {           infoTableName : "InfoTable",           dataShapeName : "Cxx-DS"     };       var values = Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(params);       // add something to the values to make them unique       // create and add new row based on Stream DataShape     // only a single line allowed!       var newValues = new Object();     newValues.a = "aaa" + i; // STRING - isPrimaryKey = true     newValues.b = "bbb" + i; // STRING     newValues.c = "ccc" + i; // STRING       values.AddRow(newValues);       // create new InfoTable row based on meta data & values     // add 10 ms to each object, to make it's timestamp unique     // otherwise entries with the same timestamp will be overwritten       var newEntry = new Object();     newEntry.timestamp = new Date(Date.now() + (i * 10));     newEntry.location = location;     newEntry.source = me.name;     newEntry.tags = tags;     newEntry.values = values;       // add new Info Table row to Info Table           myInfoTable.rows = newEntry;       }       // *** ADD myInfoTable (HOLDING MULITPLE STREAM ENTRIES) TO STREAM       // add stream entries in the InfoTable       var params = {           values: myInfoTable /* INFOTABLE */     };       // no return       Things["MyStreamThing"].AddStreamEntries(params);   To verify the values have been added correctly, call the ​GetStreamEntriesWithData​ service on the ​MyStreamThing​
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Here is a tutorial to explain the process of uploading a PMML file from an external system to Thingworx Analytics. The tutorial steps are explained in the attached PDF and all referenced files can be found in the attached ZIP.  
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Super simple widget that embeds the HTML5 audio tag, allowing MP3 files to be played and/or triggers by another mashup event.
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/* Define a DataShape used in an InfoTable Parameter for this service call */ twDataShape * sampleInfoTableAsParameterDs = twDataShape_Create(twDataShapeEntry_Create( "ColumnA" , NO_DESCRIPTION , TW_STRING )); twDataShape_AddEntry(sampleInfoTableAsParameterDs,twDataShapeEntry_Create( "ColumnB" , NO_DESCRIPTION , TW_NUMBER )); twDataShape_AddEntry(sampleInfoTableAsParameterDs,twDataShapeEntry_Create( "ColumnC" , NO_DESCRIPTION , TW_BOOLEAN )); twDataShape_SetName(sampleInfoTableAsParameterDs, "SampleInfoTableAsParameterDataShape" );      /* Define Input Parameter that is an InfoTable of Shape SampleInfoTableAsParameterDataShape */ twDataShapeEntry * infoTableDsEntry = twDataShapeEntry_Create( "itParam" , NULL , TW_INFOTABLE ); twDataShapeEntry_AddAspect(infoTableDsEntry, "dataShape" , twPrimitive_CreateFromString( "SampleInfoTableAsParameterDataShape" , TRUE ));    twDataShape * inputParametersDefinitionDs = twDataShape_Create(infoTableDsEntry);   /* Register remote function */ twApi_RegisterService( TW_THING , SERVICE_INTEGRATION_THINGNAME , "testMultiRowInfotable" , NO_DESCRIPTION ,   inputParametersDefinitionDs, TW_NOTHING , NULL , PlatformCallsServiceWithMultiRowInfoTableServiceImpl, NULL ); /* Note that you will have to manually create the datashape in ThingWorx before attempting to add this remote service to your Thing. */
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If you ever tested mashup rendering on mobile phones, you probably experienced that the mashup was not sizing to fit your mobile display. This "MobileHeader" extension enables to auto adapt the mashup to mobile displays.   It adds the following parameters to the HTML header: <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0, maximum-scale=1.0, user-scalable=0"> <meta name="apple-mobile-web-app-capable" content="yes"> <meta name="apple-mobile-web-app-status-bar-style" content="black-translucent">   In the composer just drop the "MobileHeader" extension into a section of the mashup.   This extension was tested until version 7.4.
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Disclaimer: example was provided by Hatcher Chad - chad@onfarmsystems.com   //   // For this example, we'll have an Math service   // which takes two numbers, and an operation.   // The result will be that operation performed on the two inputs.       //   // We either need an Application Key,   // or user credentials to perform the reads and writes.   // App keys are a little safer.   // In this demo, we'll store it on the Entity as a Property.   var appKey = me.appKey;       //   // The service name needs to be unique and not already in use.   var serviceName = "MyMath";       //   // What are the inputs to the service?   // We'll define them nicely here, but manipulate this object later.   var parameters = {   "op" : "STRING",   "x" : "NUMBER",   "y" : "NUMBER"   };       //   // What datatype does the service return?   // If it's an infotable,   // then you'll also have to specify the data shape   // as part of the resultType's aspect,   // but I won't demonstrate that here.   var output = "NUMBER";       //   // What is the actual service script?   // We'll define it here as an array of lines, and then join them together.   var serviceScript = [   "var result = (function() {",   " switch(op) {",   " case \"add\": return x + y;",   " case \"sub\": return x - y;",   " case \"mult\": return x * y;",   " case \"div\": return x / y;",   " default: return op in Math ? Math[op](x, y) : 0;",   " };",   "})();",   ].join("\n");       ////////       //   // Let's convert the friendly parameter definition   // into the structure that ThingWorx uses:   var parameterDefinitions = Object.keys(parameters).reduce(function(parameterDefinitions, parameterName, index) {   var parameterType = parameters[parameterName];   parameterDefinitions[parameterName] = {   "name": parameterName,   "aspects": {},   "description": "",   "baseType": parameterType,   "ordinal": index   };   return parameterDefinitions;   }, {});       //   // Now let's set up our service definition and implementation.   var definition = {   "isAllowOverride": false,   "isOpen": false,   "sourceType": "Unknown",   "parameterDefinitions": parameterDefinitions,   "name": serviceName,   "aspects": {   "isAsync": false   },   "isLocalOnly": false,   "description": "",   "isPrivate": false,   "sourceName": "",   "category": "",   "resultType": {   "name": "result",   "aspects": {},   "description": "",   "baseType": output,   "ordinal": 0   }   };       var implementation = {   "name": serviceName,   "description": "",   "handlerName": "Script",   "configurationTables": {   "Script": {   "isMultiRow": false,   "name": "Script",   "description": "Script",   "rows": [{   "code": serviceScript   }],   "ordinal": 0,   "dataShape": {   "fieldDefinitions": {   "code": {   "name": "code",   "aspects": {},   "description": "code",   "baseType": "STRING",   "ordinal": 0   }   }   }   }   }   };       ////////       //   // Here are the URLs we'll need in order to make updates.   // You can change the thing name ('ServiceModifier' here)   // to something else.   // If you use credentials instead of an app key,   // then you can remove the appKey parameter here,   // but you'll have to add the username and password   // to the two ContentLoaderFunctions calls.   var url = {   export : " http://127.0.0.1:8080/Thingworx/Things/ServiceModifier?Accept=application/json&appKey= "+appKey,   import : " http://127.0.0.1:8080/Thingworx/Things/ServiceModifier?appKey= "+appKey   };       //   // We can download the entity to modify as a JSON object.   // Older versions of ThingWorx might not support this.   var config = Resources.ContentLoaderFunctions.GetJSON({   url : url.export,   });       //   // We have to modify both the 'effectiveShape',   // as well as the 'thingShape'.   config.effectiveShape.serviceDefinitions[serviceName] = definition;   config.effectiveShape.serviceImplementations[serviceName] = implementation;       config.thingShape.serviceDefinitions[serviceName] = definition;   config.thingShape.serviceImplementations[serviceName] = implementation;       // Finally, we can push our updates back into ThingWorx.   Resources.ContentLoaderFunctions.PutText({   url : url.export,   content : JSON.stringify(config),   contentType : "application/json",   });       // The end.
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It usually happens that we need to copy a large file to ThingWorx server periodically, and what's worse, the big file is changing(like a log file). This sample give a simpler way to implement. The main idea in the sample is: 1. Lower the management burden from ThingWorx server and instead it put all the work in edge SDK side 2. Save network burden with only uploading the incremented file and append it to the older file on ThingWorx server   Java SDK version in this sample: 6.0.1-255
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This post covers how to build and operationalize a time series model using Thingworx Analytics. A lookback window is used to read multiple previous rows before the current one, and base the prediction on those lookback rows.   In this example we use time series data to predict water flow for different water pumps in a system.   There is a full explanation of the method attached, also all necessary resources are included in the attached files.
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This example provides the ability to generate a simple entity structure and some historical data for each entity. Historical data is run through a ThingWorx service to generate histogram data for display in a bar chart.  The provided ThingWorx entities and PDF document provide the example as well as documentation.
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Welcome to the Thingworx Community area for code examples and sharing.   We have a few how-to items and basic guidelines for posting content in this space.  The Jive platform the our community runs on provides some tools for posting and highlighting code in the document format that this area is based on.  Please try to follow these settings to make the area easy to use, read and follow.   At the top of your new document please give a brief description of the code sample that you are posting. Use the code formatting tool provided for all parts of code samples (including if there are multiple in one post). Try your best to put comments in the code to describe behavior where needed. You can edit documents, but note each time you save them a new version is created.  You can delete old versions if needed. You may add comments to others code documents and modify your own code samples based on comments. If you have alternative ways to accomplish the same as an existing code sample please post it to the comments. We encourage everyone to add alternatives noted in comments to the main post/document.   Format code: The double blue arrows allow you to select the type of code being inserted and will do key word highlighting as well as add line numbers for reference and discussions.
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Recently I needed to be able to parse and handle XML data natively inside of a ThingWorx script, and this XML file happened to have a SOAP namespace as well. I learned a few things along the way that I couldn’t find a lot of documentation on, so am sharing here.   Lessons Learned The biggest lesson I learned is that ThingWorx uses “E4X” XML handling. This is a language that Mozilla created as a way for JavaScript to handle XML (the full name is “ECMAscript for XML”). While Mozilla deprecated the language in 2014, Rhino, the JavaScript engine that ThingWorx uses on the server, still supports it, so ThingWorx does too. Here’s a tutorial on E4X - https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Archive/Web/E4X_tutorial The built-in linter in ThingWorx will complain about E4X syntax, but it still works. I learned how to get to the data I wanted and loop through to create an InfoTable. Hopefully this is what you want to do as well.   Selecting an Element and Iterating My data came inside of a SOAP envelope, which was meaningless information to me. I wanted to get down a few layers. Here’s a sample of my data that has made-up information in place of the customer's original data:                <SOAP-ENV : Envelope   xmlns : SOAP-ENV = "http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/"   headers = "" >     <SOAP-ENV : Body >         < get_part_schResponse   xmlns = "urn:schemas-iwaysoftware-com:iwse" >             < get_part_schResult >                 < get_part_schRow >                     < PART_NO > 123456 </ PART_NO >                     < ORD_PROC_DIV_CD > E </ ORD_PROC_DIV_CD >                     < MFG_DIV_CD > E </ MFG_DIV_CD >                     < SCHED_DT > 2020-01-01 </ SCHED_DT >                 </ get_part_schRow >                 < get_part_schRow >                     < PART_NO > 789456 </ PART_NO >                     < ORD_PROC_DIV_CD > E </ ORD_PROC_DIV_CD >                     < MFG_DIV_CD > E </ MFG_DIV_CD >                     < SCHED_DT > 2020-01-01 </ SCHED_DT >                 </ get_part_schRow >             </ get_part_schResult >         </ get_part_schResponse >     </SOAP-ENV : Body > </SOAP-ENV : Envelope > To get to the schRow data, I need to get past SOAP and into a few layers of XML. To do that, I make a new variable and use the E4X selections to get there: var   data  =  resultXML .*:: Body .*:: get_part_schResponse .*:: get_part_schResult .*; Note a few things: resultXML is a variable in the service that contains the XML data. I skipped the Envelope tag since that’s the root. The .* syntax does not mean “all the following”, it means “all namespaces”. You can define and specify the namespaces instead of using .*, but I didn’t find value in that. I found some sample code that theoretically should work on a VMware forum: https://communities.vmware.com/thread/592000. This gives me schRow as an XML List that I can iterate through. You can see what you have at this point by converting the data to a String and outputting it: var   result  =  String ( data ); Now that I am to the schRow data, I can use a for loop to add to an InfoTable: for   each  ( var   row   in   data ) {      result . AddRow ({         PartNumber:   row .*:: PART_NO ,         OrderProcessingDivCD:   row .*:: ORD_PROC_DIV_CD ,         ManufacturingDivCD:   row .*:: MFG_DIV_CD ,         ScheduledDate:   row .*:: SCHED_DT     }); } Shoo! That’s it! Data into an InfoTable! Next time, I'll ask for a JSON API. 😊
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This simple example creates an infotable of hierarchical data from an existing datashape that can be used in a tree or D3 Tree widget.  Attachments are provides that give a PDF document as well as the ThingWorx entities for the example.  If you were just interested in the service code, it is listed below: var params = {   infoTableName : "InfoTable",   dataShapeName : "TreeDataShape" }; // CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(infoTableName:STRING("InfoTable"), dataShapeName:STRING):INFOTABLE(TreeDataShape) var result = Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(params); var NewRow = {}; NewRow.Parent = "No Parent"; NewRow.Child = "Enterprise"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Enterprise"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Enterprise"; NewRow.Child = "Site1"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Wilmington Plant"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line1"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Blow Molding"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1.Line1"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line1.Asset1"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Preform Staging"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1.Line1"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line1.Asset2"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Blow Molder"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1.Line1"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line1.Asset3"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Bottle Unscrambler"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line2"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Filling"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1.Line2"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line2.Asset1"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Rinser"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1.Line2"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line2.Asset2"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Filler"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1.Line2"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line2.Asset3"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Capper"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line3"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Packaging"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1.Line3"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line3.Asset1"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Printer Labeler"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1.Line3"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line3.Asset2"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Packer"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site1.Line3"; NewRow.Child = "Site1.Line3.Asset3"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Palletizing"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Enterprise"; NewRow.Child = "Site2"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Mobile Plant"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line1"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Blow Molding"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2.Line1"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line1.Asset1"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Preform Staging"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2.Line1"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line1.Asset2"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Blow Molder"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2.Line1"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line1.Asset3"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Bottle Unscrambler"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line2"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Filling"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2.Line2"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line2.Asset1"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Rinser"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2.Line2"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line2.Asset2"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Filler"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2.Line2"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line2.Asset3"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Capper"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line3"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Packaging"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2.Line3"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line3.Asset1"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Printer Labeler"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2.Line3"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line3.Asset2"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Packer"; result.AddRow(NewRow); NewRow.Parent = "Site2.Line3"; NewRow.Child = "Site2.Line3.Asset3"; NewRow.ChildDescription = "Palletizing"; result.AddRow(NewRow);
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Hi,   I have just been playing around with the Edge MicroServer on a couple of Raspberry Pi's.  I obviously want them connected to ThingWorx, however they stop when the SSH session closes which isn't ideal.  I thought about doing something really quick and dirty using 'nohup', but this could have lead to many running processes, and wouldn't still not have started automatically when the Pi booted.  So, I did it right instead using init.d daemon configurations.   There are two files; one for the EMS and one for the Lua Script Resource.  You need to put these in /etc/init.d, then make sure they are owned by root.   sudo chown root /etc/init.d/thingworx* sudo chgrp root /etc/init.d/thingworx*   You'll need to modify the paths in the first lines of these files to match where you have your microserver folder.  Then you need to update the init.d daemon configs and enable the services.   sudo update-rc.d thingworx-ems defaults sudo update-rc.d thingworx-ems enable sudo update-rc.d thingworx-lsr defaults sudo update-rc.d thingworx-lsr enable   You can then start (stop, etc.) like this:   sudo service thingworx-ems start sudo service thingworx-lsr start   They should both also start automatically after a reboot.   Regards,   Greg
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This example is to achieve to update objects in Windchill thru extensions. It is really hard to find a resource for Windchill extension's services to take an advantage of them. So, I wrote a simple example to update objects in Windchill from Thingworx.   There are three data shapes needed to do this. One is "PTC.PLM.WindchillPartUfids" which has only "value" field (String) in it and another is "PTC.PLM.WindchillPartCheckedOutDS" which has a "ufid" field (String). Last one is "PTC.PLM.WindchillPartPropertyDS" which has a "ufid" field (String) and fields for "attributes". For an instance of the last data shape, there might be three fields as "ufid", "partPrice" and "quantity" to update parts. In this example, this data shape has two fields which are "ufid" and "almProjectId".   In this example, this needs two input parameters. One is ufid (String) and almProjectId (String). If you need to have multiple objects to update at once, you can use InfoTable type as an "ufid" input parameter instead of String type.   Note that this is an example code and need to handle exceptions if needed.     // To var params = {     infoTableName : "InfoTable",     dataShapeName : "PTC.PLM.WindchillPartUfids" };   // CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(infoTableName:STRING("InfoTable"), dataShapeName:STRING):INFOTABLE(PTC.PLM.WindchillPartUfids) var ufids = Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(params);   // PTC.PLM.WindchillPartUfids entry object var newValue = new Object(); newValue.value = ufid; // STRING   ufids.AddRow(newValue);   // Check out var params = {     ufids: ufids /* INFOTABLE */,     comment: undefined /* STRING */,     dataShape: "PTC.PLM.WindchillPartCheckedOutDS" /* DATASHAPENAME */ };   // checkedOutObjs: INFOTABLE dataShape: "undefined" var checkedOutObjsFromService = me.CheckOut(params);   var params = {     infoTableName : "InfoTable",     dataShapeName : "PTC.PLM.WindchillPartUfids" };   // CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(infoTableName:STRING("InfoTable"), dataShapeName:STRING):INFOTABLE(PTC.PLM.WindchillPartUfids) var checkedOutObjs = Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(params);   try {     var tableLength = checkedOutObjsFromService.rows.length;       for (var x = 0; x < tableLength; x++) {         var row = checkedOutObjsFromService.rows;               // PTC.PLM.WindchillPartUfids entry object         var checkedOutObj = new Object();         checkedOutObj.value = row.ufid.substring(0,row.ufid.lastIndexOf(":")); // STRING               //logger.warn("UFID : " + checkedOutObj.value);         checkedOutObjs.AddRow(checkedOutObj);           /* Update Objects in Windchill */         var params = {             infoTableName : "InfoTable",             dataShapeName : "PTC.PLM.WindchillPartPropertyDS"         };           // CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(infoTableName:STRING("InfoTable"), dataShapeName:STRING):INFOTABLE(PTC.ALM.WindchillPartPropertyDS)         var wcInfoTable = Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(params);           // PTC.ALM.WindchillPartPropertyDS entry object         var newEntry = new Object();         newEntry.ufid = checkedOutObj.value; // STRING         newEntry.almProjectId = almProjectId; // STRING           wcInfoTable.AddRow(newEntry);           var params = {             objects: wcInfoTable /* INFOTABLE */,             modification: "REPLACE" /* STRING */,             dataShape: "PTC.PLM.WindchillPartCheckedOutDS" /* DATASHAPENAME */         };           // result: INFOTABLE dataShape: "undefined"         var result = me.Update(params);     }   } catch(err) {     logger.warn("ERROR Catched");     var params = {         ufids: ufids /* INFOTABLE */,         dataShape: "PTC.PLM.WindchillPartCheckedOutDS" /* DATASHAPENAME */     };       // result: INFOTABLE dataShape: "undefined"     var result = me.CancelCheckOut(params);  }   var params = {     ufids: checkedOutObjs /* INFOTABLE */,     comment: undefined /* STRING */,     dataShape: "PTC.PLM.WindchillPartCheckedOutDS" /* DATASHAPENAME */ };   // result: INFOTABLE dataShape: "undefined" var result = me.CheckIn(params);
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Let's assume I collect Timeseries Data of two temperature sensors, located next to each other. This is done for redundancy and ensuring the quality of measures. Each of the sensors is logged into its Property in ThingWorx and I can create a Timeseries for the individual sensors. However I would like to create a combined InfoTable that holds information for both sensors, but averages out their values.   Instead of reading values from a stream, I just create some custom data for both InfoTables. After this I use the UNION function to combine the two tables and sort them. Once they are sorted, the INTERPOLATE function allows to group the InfoTable by timestamp.   With this, I have combined the two sensor result into on result set. Taking the average of numbers will give closer results to the real value (as both sensors might not be 100% accurate). In case one sensor does not have data for a given point in time, it will still be considered in the final output.   InfoTable1:   2018-12-18 00:00:00.000 2 2018-12-19 00:00:00.000 3 2018-12-20 00:00:00.000 5 2018-12-21 00:00:00.000 7   InfoTable2:   2018-12-18 00:00:00.000 1 2018-12-19 12:00:00.000 2 2018-12-20 00:00:00.000 3 2018-12-21 00:00:00.000 4   Combined Result:   2018-12-18 00:00:00.000 1.5 2018-12-19 00:00:00.000 3 2018-12-19 12:00:00.000 2 2018-12-20 00:00:00.000 4 2018-12-21 00:00:00.000 5.5     This can be done with the following code:   // Required DataShape "myInfoTableShape": "timestamp" = DATETIME, "value" = NUMBER // The Service Output is an InfoTable based on the same DataShape var params = { infoTableName : "InfoTable", dataShapeName : "myInfoTableShape" }; // Create two InfoTables, representing the data of each sensor var infoTable1 = Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(params); var infoTable2 = Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(params); var newEntry = new Object(); // Create custom data for InfoTable1 newEntry.timestamp = 1545091200000; newEntry.value = 2; infoTable1.AddRow(newEntry); newEntry.timestamp = 1545177600000; newEntry.value = 3; infoTable1.AddRow(newEntry); newEntry.timestamp = 1545264000000; newEntry.value = 5; infoTable1.AddRow(newEntry); newEntry.timestamp = 1545350400000; newEntry.value = 7; infoTable1.AddRow(newEntry); // Create custom data for InfoTable2 newEntry.timestamp = 1545091200000; newEntry.value = 1; infoTable2.AddRow(newEntry); newEntry.timestamp = 1545220800000; newEntry.value = 2; infoTable2.AddRow(newEntry); newEntry.timestamp = 1545264000000; newEntry.value = 3; infoTable2.AddRow(newEntry); newEntry.timestamp = 1545350400000; newEntry.value = 4; infoTable2.AddRow(newEntry); // Combine the two InfoTables via the UNION function var unionTable = Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].Union({ t1: infoTable1, t2: infoTable2 }); // Optional: Sort the table by timestamp var sortedTable = Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].Sort({ sortColumn: "timestamp", t: unionTable, ascending: true }); // Interpolate the (sorted) table by Interval and take average values and build the result var result = Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].Interpolate({ mode: "INTERVAL", timeColumn: "timestamp", t: sortedTable, ignoreMissingData: undefined, stats: "AVG", endDate: 1545609600000, columns: "value", count: undefined, startDate: 1545004800000 });  
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This Javascript snippet creates a random value between those limits:   var dbl_Value = Math.floor(Math.random()*(max-min+1)+min);
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Applicable Releases: ThingWorx Platform 7.0 to 8.5   Description:   Introduction to ThingWorx Extension Development, with the following topics: What is an Extension Why building an Extension Prerequisites Installing Eclipse plugin and features Creating entities with the plugin and including exported Entities in an Extension Project Upgrading or Updating and Existing extension in ThingWorx Building with Gradle and Ant       ThingWorx Extension Development Guide
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In case it's useful for anyone, I successfully used the Thingworx Importer to import an Entity using version 8.4.1. The import command was in a CURL script (can also be run using e.g. Cygwin on Windows) and the entity data was contained in an XML file. The XML file is attached to this post, and the CURL script is copied into the bottom of the post body.   Notes on using the script: Copy CURL code into import.sh You might need to change the line endings to UNIX, e.g. in Notepad++ menu option Edit > EOL Conversion > Unix Give permissions to run import.sh (chmod +x import.sh) ./import.sh >>>>>>>>>>>> #!/bin/bash APPKEY="2e6704c0-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-a1589e387d1a" TWX_HTTP_PORT="8018" FILE_PATH_TWX="Things_testImport.xml" PROTOCOL="http://" IP="localhost" URL="$PROTOCOL""$IP"":""$TWX_HTTP_PORT""/Thingworx/Importer?purpose=import" curl -X POST -H 'appKey: '$APPKEY \ -H 'Content-Type: multipart/form-data' \ -H 'Accept: application/json' \ -H 'x-thingworx-session: true' \ -H 'X-XSRF-TOKEN: TWX-XSRF-TOKEN-VALUE' \ -F 'upload=@'$FILE_PATH_TWX \ $URL <<<<<<<<<<<<   Also TWX Importer is explained in this support article.
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As it is not available in support.ptc.com. Please provide Creo View and Thing View Widget Documentation or guide to view 3D Object in custom mashup/UI except for the ThingWorx Navigate app.   I am posting this request to the community. Not for this ThingWorx developers portal after discussing it with PTC technical support.  Please refer to article  CS291582 .   LeighPTC,  I have no option to do move to the community again. But this had happened.   The post Creo View and Thing View Widget Documentation to view 3D Object in custom mashup/UI. was moved by LeighPTC.   Please don't move this request to the ThingWorx developers portal.     So that PTC Customer can have Creo View and Thing View Widget Documentation to view 3D Object in custom mashup/UI. As it is not available.   Many thanks, Rahul
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