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Happy Pi Day

DanMarotta
Newbie

Happy Pi Day

For all the mathematics fans out there, I wish you a Happy Pi Day (3/14); celebrating everyone's favorite mathematical constant

Here are some ways to celebrate >>

-Dan

Tags (3)
33 REPLIES 33

Re: Happy Pi Day

Dan,

I have some problems with your statement, on mathematical and logic grounds.

- 3/14=0.2142857.... which is far away from 3.14159265....

- While it is easy to prove that there exist no uninteresting numbers, I doubt that you can prove that Pi is everyone's favourite mathematical constant.

Luc

Re: Happy Pi Day

To me, e seems more natural

Re: Happy Pi Day

Richard Jackson wrote:

To me, e seems more natural

Agreed. I'm a great exponent of eating πie off a log table made from the branches of trees with square roots (although some think this is rather radical, I think it's an integral part of the experience; it's what differentiates the true mathematician from the remainder)

Re: Happy Pi Day

Yes, under the right circumstances a good πie can be an almost transcendental experience; the complex flavors can transport you to an imaginary domain. Nevertheless, whether or not π is 1’s favorite mathematical constant is a function of 1’s personal preferences. Clearly, in sum ways π is greater than e, but e has it’s base of supporters too.

Re: Happy Pi Day

Stuart, Richard,

Pi must be baked at the correct Degree or it will not achieve a Golden [brown] Ratio. I'm Maxed out on my mathematical play on words because I'm a Square.

Binomial for now,

Dan

Re: Happy Pi Day

Luc,

I must ask, do you have a personal favorite if it is not Pi?

Re: Happy Pi Day

Dan,

I always felt myself more intrigued by e.

Luc

Re: Happy e Day

Students in Russia know the second math constant e as 2.7 (all know it) + two times... Leo Tolstoy - a year of him born - 2.718281828.

Re: Happy e Day

e.PNG

Loi.

Re: Happy e Day

e-CF.PNG

e-L.Ex.PNG

Re: Happy e Day

e float,250.PNG

Re: Happy e Day

Euler-1.PNG

Euler-2.PNG

Re: Happy Pi Day

Happy pie day

untitled.bmp

Mike

Re: Happy Pi Day

Mike Armstrong wrote:

Happy pie day

Yes - three base math constants - p (p+Ctrl+G), i and e.

Re: Happy Pi Day

Mike,

Where's the vanilla ice cream?

Re: Happy Pi Day

Here you go - there goes the diet.....

index.jpeg

Mike

Re: Happy Pi Day

there goes the diet.....

I though a slice of pie, rather then the entire pie, with only two scoops of ice cream was the diet.

Re: Happy Pi Day

I though a slice of pie, rather then the entire pie, with only two scoops of ice cream was the diet.

Oh yer, good point. (As he heads back to the frezzer for the rest of the tub)

Mike

Re: Happy Pi Day

DanMarotta wrote:

Mike,

Where's the vanilla ice cream?

Look, enough of the food, already. Where's the beer? Being pi-eyed is the ultimate tribute to our e-ponymous number!

Re: Happy Pi Day

Mike Armstrong wrote:

Happy pie day

untitled.bmp

Mike

Mike,

You have a Pi-snack - and here is the Pi-drinking.

The price of vodka in Soviet times long time was:

0.25 liters - 1 ruble 49 kopecks and 0.5 liters - 2 rubles 87 kopecks.

1.49^2.87=3.14

Pi-vodka.png

Re: Happy Pi Day

I do have one issue:- I can't believe anyone celebrates pie day like pancake day.

Mike

Re: Happy Pi Day

Happy pi/pie day:

Re: Happy Pi Day

VladimirN. wrote:

Happy pi/pie day:

More practical Pi-pie

Pi-Pie.png

Re: Happy Pi Day

More about Pi day and Pi Pie (Fractions).

Why I did not have Mathcad with gcd function in the first class of my school

See more about this problem here - http://communities.ptc.com/docs/DOC-3522

fracion.png

Re: Happy Pi Day

Happy Pi, e & i day.

The 6 of the Mathcad Clock has Pi, e & i - 3 base Math constants:

MathClock6.png

Re: Happy Pi Day

CircularRule.jpg

I'd like to remember Pi Day by making reference to one of your previous posts, Valery. (I could not think of a good reply to your remarks about Laplace transforms, so I did not post there.)

A circular slide rule is compact precisely because it wraps a linear slide rule around the circumference of a circle. The key to the transformation is pi.

Here is a snapshot of my own circular slide rule, a Sama and Etani "Model 90" (the diameter is 90 mm). Note that the "1" indicator on the C scale is lined up with pi on the D scale. So slide (rotate) the red indicator around to 9 on the C scale (for 90 mm) and read off 2.83 (i.e., 283 mm) from the D scale. Therefore, pi times the diameter 90mm is the circumference 283 mm.

Since there are 25.4 mm to an inch, we get 283/25.4 = 11.1 inches. To do this division on the circular rule, rotate the C scale until 2.54 is beneath 2.83 on the D scale. Then the C scale's "1" indicator points to 1.11 (11.1 inches) on the D scale. So our circular slide rule is equivalent to an 11-inch straight rule, at least for multiplication and division, since they use scales near the circumference of the rule.

Pi rules!

Re: Happy Pi Day

RogerMansfield wrote:

(I could not think of a good reply to your remarks about Laplace transforms, so I did not post there.)

I was very sad when it has not received replies to a comment about the Laplace on the forum on Slide rule.

Variants:

  • I'm wrong
  • My colleagues on the forum do not understand this fine topic
  • ???

Re: Happy Pi Day

I do think that you are right, and for my part, I did understand. But all I could think of to add to that discussion was that I thought your demonstration was very insightful. It occurred to me to attempt to prove your results using the definitions and properties of Laplace direct and inverse transforms, but I just don't have the time right now to go in that direction ...

Re: Happy Pi Day

When I was a student it was high art get mantissa and evaluate the order (power?) of the numbers on the slide rule ...

I have have have have numbers!

But now... With computer...

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