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3D curve from 2 sketches

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3D curve from 2 sketches

The following is an example of intersecting 2 sketches to create a

3-dimensional curve that can be used for sweeping cables or as a

boundary for the boundary blend tool.

Sketch 1

  • A line and two arcs sketched on the Front plane.

sketch1.PNG

Sketch 2

  • 2 lines and 2 arcs sketched on the Top plane.

sketch2.PNG

  • Note:   The endpoints of the sketches are colinear, but they
    do not have to be coincident.  In other words, they should be
    the same length, but they do not have to touch.  However, the
    feature will still work, but with gaps in the 3D curve.

sketch2a.PNG

Intersect

  • CTRL select both sketches, then choose Edit>Intersect.  No dashboard menu
    will appear, there will be an instant 3D curve. 

highlight sketches.PNG

  • The following images show the curve being used for sweeping a circular section and creating a Boundary Blend.
    Note: an additional curve was used to create the Boundary Blend.

3d sweep.PNG  blend.PNG

This tool is a lot of fun to experiment with, try it out.  It works with closed sketches, too!  Here are
a couple more examples.  The first one uses a closed and an open sketch.  The other uses two intersected

curves and a sketch for a 3-chain Boundary Blend in one direction.

3d sweep2.PNG  blend2.PNG


Tags (2)
2 REPLIES 2

Re: 3D curve from 2 sketches

Oddly enough, right after posting this I came across a discussion solution by Brian Martin that explains how to do what I've shown plus so much more.  The example used in the discussion is a real-world solution.  Click the following link to see it.

http://communities.ptc.com/thread/36581

Re: 3D curve from 2 sketches

Oddly enough, right after posting this I came across a discussion solution by Brian Martin that explains how to do what I've shown plus so much more. The example used in the discussion is a real-world solution. Click the following link to see it.