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Fast Facts! Quick Tips for Using PTC Creo - Top Down Design

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Fast Facts! Quick Tips for Using PTC Creo - Top Down Design

Today’s “Fast Facts!” post covers top down design for skeleton models. This content is intended to provide users with easy-to-use, actionable tips and tricks for how to use PTC Creo more effectively. These tips come from Evan Winter, an expert in our PTC Creo training group.

 

1. Skeleton Models

  • Used for design framework, space claims, interfaces between components and assembly references.
    • Skeletons should contain sketches, curves, surfaces and datums only.
    • Not factored into mass properties calculations.
  • Use in conjunction with publish geom. and copy geom. to share design information.
    • Publish geometry in the source part creates a “container” of references that can be shared with a target part later.
  • Use “multiple_skeletons_allowed” to share design information between multiple skeletons.
  • Create skeletons in subassemblies.
Image1.jpg

2.Standard Skeleton Model Methods

  • For Skeletons that drive geometry and assembly position.
    • Use “publish geometry” and/or “copy geometry” that references the assembly context.
  • For skeletons that drive geometry only (constraints/connections added later in assembly context).
    • Use “publish geometry” and/or “external copy geometry” that references the skeleton model directly.
    • Allows placement between skeleton CSYS and component CSYS.

 

Image2&3.jpgImage4.jpg

3. Motion Skeletons Overview

  • Used for design framework of mechanized assemblies.
    • Motion skeleton is a .ASM that contains a standard skeleton and “body” skeletons.
    • Standard skeleton contains design geometry.
    • Body skeletons are assigned geometry from the standard skeleton.
    • The first body skeleton created is assumed as the “ground” component and is fixed. Subsequent body skeletons are assigned assembly Connections assumed from sketch constraints (point/point, point/line).
  • Create parts in the assembly context
    • Parts are “attached” to body skeletons and assume their motion definition. No assembly connections are created manually.
Image5.jpgImage6.jpg

 

Stayed tuned as we cover more PTC Creo commands, features, and shortcuts designed to help you use the product faster!

 

Have some ideas about what you’d like to learn more about? Send me a message or leave a comment below and we’ll write up the best ideas from the community. Thanks for reading, looking forward to all of your feedback!

1 REPLY 1

Re: Fast Facts! Quick Tips for Using PTC Creo - Top Down Design

For skeletons that drive geometry only (constraints/connections added later in assembly context).

  • Use “publish geometry” and/or “external copy geometry” that references the skeleton model directly.

Means we can directly copy bottom part geometrical copy ? it looks a great trick