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How to Sweep this

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Re: How to Sweep this

Nice, lucky you!  I started on V15 back in early '96, and remember ISDX from way back, and thet it wasn't 100% integrated into Pro/E.  Sadly, even though I worked at Moen (faucets) at the time, they didn't want to spend the money to buy the package.  So, we had to make do the best we could with the surfacing tools in the "Advanced Assembly" module (I think it was called).  I think the important thing I learned from doing plastics work, was that being C2 wasn't really needed.  You just got as close as you could, called it good, and simply specified that the mold maker polished the molds to C2.  Done.  I know some whiny Industrial Designers want to try and insist the models themselves be C2 everywhere, but in reality, you're going to get what the mold-makers give you anyway, and there's nothing you can do about it.  So why kill yourself and spend endless hours and waste endless amounts of money trying to GET C2 in the model when it doesn't matter?

 

I would really love to play with the free-form modeler though, especially since I want to start using Pro/E to do art works (bronzes).  From what I've seen you can make some really cool shapes, quickly.  Better, of a curve you put in there to shape the surface doesn't actually work, you can choose to have that curve just influence the surface, or actually control it and make another curve influence only.  Yes, you have some of those tools in Boundary Blend, but it's nowhere near as nice.  BB seems kind of clunky and cumbersome now.

 

I envy you having ISDX considering some of the Pro/WORKAROUNDS I've had to come up with....

Re: How to Sweep this

@FrankSSchiavone 

I have the habit to work and design the plastic parts ((after the work of Designers who give the aesthetic and sometimes i create it myself) ... in many fields but not in the transports field.

I confirm that the mold makers don't have the tools to produce a mold with C2 on the surface.

 

C2 help make HIGH RENDERING quality effect for the Designers

Re: How to Sweep this

C2 and higher continuity is important in many engineering designs. Cam profiles, aerodynamic surfaces, and optical parts are all situations where C2 or higher continuity can be important to the design actually working as intended. ISDX currently supports creation of curves and surfaces with higher order continuity that is not possible with Creo surface features. The higher order continuity can also be exploited to make more robust CAD models. It is often beneficial to have C2+ curve and surface connection in models that get flexed during the design cycle.

 

I can assure you that molded plastic parts that have highly reflective finishes will exhibit visual artifacts under lighting if surface connections are tangent. PVD/CVD coatings on molded plastic substrates have a mirror like finish. Most people will not be able to spot continuity issues on reflective surfaces but when they look through a lens that has not been built with the needed curvature connections they will notice it immediately due to distortion.

Re: How to Sweep this

If your mold maker can't polish to C2, then anything you do to make the model itself C2 is pointless...  😉

Re: How to Sweep this

I agree that there is the odd occasion that C2 in the model itself is important.  When working for NASA many years ago it was an aerodynamic/airflow issue in some ducting into a jet engine.  Optical parts for sure, etc.  But I'd say the vast majority of parts, especially plastic parts, can be made as close as possible if you can't achieve C2 (frequently not possible), and let the mold makers do their magic.

 

For the most part, however, at least in my experience, if you get it as close as you can (without ISDX), what you get is always dependent on the mold, not the model.  You can spend the extra time/effort modeling perfect models all day, and if the mold maker can;t give you C2 with the polish, it's a waste.  Likewise, in every plastic part I've designed where I couldn't get C2 with just Creo, I spec'd the mold maker to make all the surfaces C2, and that's what I got.

Re: How to Sweep this

Hello,

 

Back to say,

1> Finally this part is aborted from the update program, so i am just playing to obtain an acceptable result and learn more about CREO as kdirth says 🙂

 

2> i don't know why it is not possible to have a better/more control on resolution/precision of the model ... the facets are visible ! the option prepare model doesn't improve it, here it is at 0.0001 !

Boundary Blend_Not Smooth_1.PNG  Boundary Blend_Not Smooth_2.PNG

 

3> ISDX as an option in CREO ... a bit expensive ... so that's why many office engineers doens't hav it .

 

4> Here in this case of surface with the end inside that is not tangent ... the best way is Boundary Blend ! as managed also tbraxton with ISDX, it seems smooth in picture but after import some facets are on the surface ! but it is better than without ISDX ! !

 

THANKS GUYS ... in making evolving the subject of surface and at the end the C2 control !

If another wants to try another way around to get something really smooth, the files are in this post ...

if you can open it ... 🙂 ...  was unlucky

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