cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Is there a way to take flattened quilts and put them in a flat drawing file?

SOLVED
Highlighted
Level 1

Is there a way to take flattened quilts and put them in a flat drawing file?

I'm trying to put a bunch of flattened quilts from one object and put them in a drawing file so they can get cut, and I can't figure out how to put the surfaces into the drawing file. Kinda new at this. Thanks for the help everyone.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions

Re: Is there a way to take flattened quilts and put them in a flat drawing file?

I figured that was your next question

No problem, we are here for solutions, and if that doesn't work, we offer Pro|WorkArounds^tm

An easy way to make these independent is to export and import them. That gives you the greatest freedom.

Since you also want to manage orientation, I would suggest placing each one in a drawing at scale 1:1; turn off the border; and export as DXF (you can even manage the origin if you like with a point feature). Now you can import the DXF as a part and use a fill command if you need it to be a surface.

This is only one of many ways, but this to me is the most straight forward.

I'm guessing you are trying to create a nested set in a single drawing. If you make each on a single part, you can create a mass-drawing with a view for each part. Then you can add each model and move it around as needed for a best fit for all the views.

Other methods include exporting as iges surface by creating an alternate coordinate system for the export to help manage orientation.

Creo doesn't like to break relations. However, you can create sketches by using the project edge feature creation. If you then delete the reference in the reference collector, it makes the resulting spline independent.

Again, a lot of ways to skin this cat, but there is no right or wrong way to get there.

5 REPLIES 5

Re: Is there a way to take flattened quilts and put them in a flat drawing file?

Welcome to the forum, Chase.

The flattened quilts are currently a part model, correct?

You add the model to the drawing and create a view. if you want more than 1 model, you can add additional models and again, place a view.

You do need a view orientation. If you save views in the model that ensure that the surface is flat to the screen, this will make placing the views easier.

Surfaces are not much different from solid models.when it comes to drawings.

Re: Is there a way to take flattened quilts and put them in a flat drawing file?

Thanks for the help, I wasn't sure if there was another way to do it. I guess my next question is how do I hide the original model that's still sitting behind the flattened quilts? It's imported from Catia and when I try to hide the imported model it just stays there but gets grayed out in the side panel. Thanks for the help!

Re: Is there a way to take flattened quilts and put them in a flat drawing file?

Oh, yes, that. For some reason, you cannot hide the original feature. In the drawing, you might be able to erase the lines using the edge display dialog...

edge_display.PNG

You can also try an extrude/cut to completely cut the original object out of there.

Re: Is there a way to take flattened quilts and put them in a flat drawing file?

Okay, sorry that I keep chaining questions onto this, but is there a way to copy the surfaces to a new spot and line them up as a part as independent geometries? Right now they're all on different places and stuff, and they all reference the original part so I can't just delete if. Also, if that isn't possible, is there another Cad program that can do that? Thank you for all the help, really.

Re: Is there a way to take flattened quilts and put them in a flat drawing file?

I figured that was your next question

No problem, we are here for solutions, and if that doesn't work, we offer Pro|WorkArounds^tm

An easy way to make these independent is to export and import them. That gives you the greatest freedom.

Since you also want to manage orientation, I would suggest placing each one in a drawing at scale 1:1; turn off the border; and export as DXF (you can even manage the origin if you like with a point feature). Now you can import the DXF as a part and use a fill command if you need it to be a surface.

This is only one of many ways, but this to me is the most straight forward.

I'm guessing you are trying to create a nested set in a single drawing. If you make each on a single part, you can create a mass-drawing with a view for each part. Then you can add each model and move it around as needed for a best fit for all the views.

Other methods include exporting as iges surface by creating an alternate coordinate system for the export to help manage orientation.

Creo doesn't like to break relations. However, you can create sketches by using the project edge feature creation. If you then delete the reference in the reference collector, it makes the resulting spline independent.

Again, a lot of ways to skin this cat, but there is no right or wrong way to get there.