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Radius on an open surface

Participant

Radius on an open surface

This has happened to me many times:

I have an open quilt and want to round a corner on it. The corner is where 2 surfaces meet. These surfaces have boundaries that lie on a plane. Where the round comes down to this plane, instead of lying on the plane, it kind of lifts up and away from the plane. Usually I have to mirror the quilt and merge the 2 quilts (to create a closed quilt, then a solid), because the thing is symmetrical. But of course, when I merge the two halves they don't close because of that round edge not lying on the plane.

Does anyone know a way of making it behave? I understand the geometrical reason why it does that... the trouble is I can't imagine a scenario where an engineer wants the edge of his radiused corner to lift away in a graceful spline tangential to the adjecent edges. Flat part lines are cheaper.

And no, I don't want to make it a closed quilt with a flat surface on the plane, for reasons I can't be bothered explaining as it's going-home time

2 REPLIES 2

Re: Radius on an open surface

  • Extend the surfaces and trim the extra after the round.

  • Sweep the round along two guide curves on the surfaces and merge.

  • Define the surfaces with the round as part of it.

  • Extend the round and trim it.

What you are seeing is as expected.

When you start working with draft angles, 3D turns into 12D

Re: Radius on an open surface

Yeah, I've done all of these, especially the extend ones. That of course addes 2 features every time I do it. Sweeping a surface doesn't usually give the same result as a round, and also doesn't always work.

I thought there may have been some setting I could have used. I don't know, for example, what "extend surfaces" means. I have tried that before but it makes no visible difference to the round.

Looks like another Product Idea coming up, as I can only see this as a flaw in the software. Like I said, I can't imagine why an engineer would not want the end of the round to lie on the same plane as the adjacent edges.