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Lmtools with license file Server port 7788 / Daemon port 7799

drieffel
11-Garnet

Lmtools with license file Server port 7788 / Daemon port 7799

I'm in the process of trying to obtain a license across a VPN connection.  In viewing the license file; the previous admin had set the Server and Daemon to 2 different ports.  Up to this point everything I have read has used the same port for both.  Is there a logical reason to set it up this way?  Should I make them the same?

 

SERVER intralink PTC_HOSTID=XX-XX-XX-XX-XX-XX 7788
DAEMON ptc_d C:\Ptc\flexlm\i486_nt\obj\ptc_d.exe C:\Ptc\flexlm\licensing\ptc.opt 7799

 

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions

@drieffel

 

Two ports in license have a logical reason. Licensing tool contains two daemons, master (lmgrd/lmadin) and vandor (ptc_d) and both of these needs separate port for communication. Master daemon in license is defined to TCP port 7788 but on other side vendor daemon is free to use any open port. 

 

If there are strong network or firewall which blocks any random traffic can block communication for vendor daemon as it is free to pick any random port and in such cases that port may get blocked by firewall. To overcome that situation, adding a port at the end of ptc.opt, forces vendor daemon to communicate on that specific port. And it also clarifies that specific port defined at the end needs to be free for communication. 

 

I hope this will clarify the query. 

View solution in original post

8 REPLIES 8

Commonly the port is the same for the Server & Daemon.  I have not seen too many license.dat files, where a port was specified at the end of the DAEMON line.

@drieffel

 

Two ports in license have a logical reason. Licensing tool contains two daemons, master (lmgrd/lmadin) and vandor (ptc_d) and both of these needs separate port for communication. Master daemon in license is defined to TCP port 7788 but on other side vendor daemon is free to use any open port. 

 

If there are strong network or firewall which blocks any random traffic can block communication for vendor daemon as it is free to pick any random port and in such cases that port may get blocked by firewall. To overcome that situation, adding a port at the end of ptc.opt, forces vendor daemon to communicate on that specific port. And it also clarifies that specific port defined at the end needs to be free for communication. 

 

I hope this will clarify the query. 

So if the two have different ports, when a client on another computer in the network wishes to obtain a license, they will specify port 7788, correct? I think that's the big question, here.

I'll bet this comes up a lot in the next few weeks...

TomU
23-Emerald III
(To:KenFarley)

Edit:  Sorry, I misread your question.  Yes, only 7788 needs to be specified on the client's computers.

----------------------------

The end users do not need to specify the second (extra) port.  Having that in the license file just keeps the daemon running on certain ports and helps the administrators know what ports need to be open on the firewall.

Just additional note...

It is also possible to define rules allowing incoming communication for exe-files in the firewall settings on the license server.

These exe-files are:

  • lmadmin.exe -OR- lmgrd.exe
  • ptc_d.exe

 


Martin Hanák

In Creo, on the client machine, is there something that needs to be configured relating the Vendor Daemon to 7799?  Or is Creo only Connecting the with the Master (Lmgrd/LMadmin) through the 7788 port (via PTC_D_LICENSE_FILE variable)?

MartinHanak
23-Emerald V
(To:drieffel)


@drieffel wrote:

In Creo, on the client machine, is there something that needs to be configured relating the Vendor Daemon to 7799?  Or is Creo only Connecting the with the Master (Lmgrd/LMadmin) through the 7788 port (via PTC_D_LICENSE_FILE variable)?


Hi,

on client machine

  • only 7788 port is mentioned in psf file
  • eg. ENV=PTC_D_LICENSE_FILE-=7788@licenseservername

on license server machine

  • communication via ports 7788, 7799 must be enabled in firewall incoming rules (this is valid for Windows Firewall)

 


Martin Hanák

Update..  After going in circles on this port issue; this turned out to not really matter.   I assumed the specification of ports was the reason I could not obtain a licence when using a VPN.  The firewall rules where in place but just could not obtain a license.  The problem was in fact the port settings on the VPN was blocking the communication with the license server.

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