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Single Again?

Single Again?

A few years ago the trend to migrate away from single CRT monitors to
multiple (e.g. two or more) LCD monitors began.

Have any of you recently switched back to specifying/ordering single
monitor layouts for your workstations?

It seems to me that having one large-scale (e.g. 24", 27", 30",
etc.) 16:9 aspect ratio LCD monitor is becoming more popular than having
multiple 4:3 aspect ratio LCD monitors.

Pros? Cons? Other comments besides "Gimme four 30" 16:9 LCDs!"?


Regards,

Dustin Neifer
General Dynamics Land Systems





This is an e-mail from General Dynamics Land Systems. It is for the intended recipient only and may contain confidential and privileged information. No one else may read, print, store, copy, forward or act in reliance on it or its attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, please return this message to the sender and delete the message and any attachments from your computer. Your cooperation is appreciated.

3 REPLIES 3

Single Again?

We are a bit behind... I recently switched from a single 21" CRT to a
24" Widescreen LCD along with a 20" regular LCD. I had to buy the 24"
myself, which is why I don't have two matching screens (as I do at
home...two 24"!!!). I definitely like having the extra space to view
other sheets while having Pro/E running on my big monitor. To me it's
well worth the effort/cost to have the duals. I can't imagine the size
of screen that would be required to equal the display area! A little
math shows it to be something around 32!!!! Wonder how much THAT would
cost!! Probably still a price break with two smaller screens over one
larger screen. And considering that most high end graphic cards can
handle dual monitors, seems to me that way to go...

Paul Korenkiewicz
FEV Engine Technology
4554 Glenmeade
Auburn Hills, MI, 48326

Single Again?

Hi Dustin and others

A dual 27" LCD setup is the most ideal configuration in my opinion (if
you can spend the money and deskspace).

At our site we just recently upgraded all our Eningeers to a new monitor
configuration.
For cost reasons they could choose between two example LCD setups:

*
24" Widescreen (1920x1200)
*
22" Widescreen + 19" (1600x1050 + 1280x1024)

The advantage of a 24" screen is that you get more height (1200 pixels)

The disadvantage of just a single wide screen is that Pro/E always opens
up to the maximum windowsize.
So you don't have the extra window space to the right which you do have
with a dual monitor setup.
This extra space is ideal for users who are used to opening up a lot of
different windows during their work.
And can also be used to place overlapping Pro/E windows (e.g. during
assembly).

The 24"W was chosen by 60% the 22"W+19" by 40%.

Another thing to consider is actual pixel size. And smaller isn't better
in this case.
With a smaller pixelsize anything with a fixed resolution appears
smaller on your screen.

Normal
Widescreen
D diameter 17'' 19'' 19'' W 20'' W 22'' W 24'' W
27'' W 30'' W
height pixels 1024 1024 900 1050 1050 1200 1200
1600
width pixels 1280 1280 1440 1680 1680 1920 1920
2560


D diam. (mm) 432 483 483 508 559 610
686 762
height mm 270 301 256 269 296 323 363
404
width mm 337 377 409 431 474 517 582
646
Pixelsize mm 0.263 0.294 0.284 0.256 0.282 0.269
0.303 0.252




Regards,

Olaf.


Summary: Single Again?

-------
Summary
-------

There were nine replies, most of whom indicated that the lifestyle of a
monitor polygamist is still preferred. Thanks to all those who took the
time to respond.


-----------
Response 01
-----------

The hardware vendor was going to set us up with a demo 24". The thought
was it could replace dual monitors. I think they were under the
impression we had 17". One 24 seems too small to me, but haven't tried
it. I think one 24 would be too small, but we'll see.

I'd be very interested on what you find.

- Dual 24s would be fine ;-)


-----------
Response 02
-----------

Each of the users here use two 24" 16:9 flat panel monitors, except for
one, and she never liked having more than one monitor for whatever reason.


-----------
Response 03
-----------

Our company feels the best solution in terms of screen real estate and
cost are dual 22? LCD?s. A single 16:9 monitor has the most appealing
aspect ratio for ProE and the second allows two applications to be run
side by side, or in our case we actually run 3 or 4 in that window (email,
PLM, Excel, and maybe a web browser or other applications). And with 22?
LCDs around $250, the payback is in a matter of weeks at most. Our only
issue is that both ATI and nVidia still do not seem to understand that
people are actually using dual monitors and their drivers are equally
horrible in this area.


-----------
Response 04
-----------

This may not be a direct answer to your question, but when we bought our
last systems, we got them with a 24", and a 19".

I personally would NOT like to go back to a single anything, no matter
how wide it is. The nicest thing about twins, is that you can have
different apps on each screen, and quickly switch between them, without
having to pick on the Task bar, or ALT-TAB to get to it. That's a huge
benefit, when you're trying to assemble something, and Pro starts that
window "flipping" thing, and pretty soon, you can't figure out which
window is the correct window.

Twins are the way to go, IMHO ...


-----------
Response 05
-----------

We are a bit behind ... I recently switched from a single 21" CRT to a
24" Widescreen LCD along with a 20" regular LCD. I had to buy the 24"
myself, which is why I don't have two matching screens (as I do at
home...two 24"!!!). I definitely like having the extra space to view
other sheets while having Pro/E running on my big monitor. To me it's
well worth the effort/cost to have the duals. I can't imagine the size of
screen that would be required to equal the display area! A little math
shows it to be something around 32!!!! Wonder how much THAT would cost!!
Probably still a price break with two smaller screens over one larger
screen. And considering that most high end graphic cards can handle dual
monitors, seems to me that way to go ...


-----------
Response 06
-----------

We do both -

Our std is a 24" (widescreen HP), which 90% of our users have. The
remaining 10% are getting used to duals.

we have one user with two 20" LCDs. a few non-cad users with a laptop
and a 17" or 19" even some 20's.

I have a 17" widescreen laptop, with a second 20" LCD.

Pros: obvious ones. . .more realestate (Assuming you add not clone the
image. . .) if there are two apps running, one can go to one screen, one
on the other

Cons: If you do attempt to run two apps, some don't play well w/two
screens. The app often forgets which screen it's display is on. Menus
pop up on the wrong screen. . .workable, but the only con I can think of
besides this next one: Technical difficulties, especially for non-IT savvy
users, and even more so for laptop users who aren't too IT savvy. . .

Overall, two monitors has shown us to be better than one, no matter the
size.


-----------
Response 07
-----------

A dual 27" LCD setup is the most ideal configuration in my opinion (if
you can spend the money and deskspace).

At our site we just recently upgraded all our Eningeers to a new monitor
configuration.
For cost reasons they could choose between two example LCD setups:
24" Widescreen (1920x1200)
22" Widescreen + 19" (1600x1050 + 1280x1024)
The advantage of a 24" screen is that you get more height (1200 pixels)

The disadvantage of just a single wide screen is that Pro/E always opens
up to the maximum windowsize.
So you don't have the extra window space to the right which you do have
with a dual monitor setup.
This extra space is ideal for users who are used to opening up a lot of
different windows during their work.
And can also be used to place overlapping Pro/E windows (e.g. during
assembly).

The 24"W was chosen by 60% the 22"W+19" by 40%.

Another thing to consider is actual pixel size. And smaller isn't better
in this case.
With a smaller pixelsize anything with a fixed resolution appears
smaller on your screen.



Normal
Widescreen
D
diameter
17''
19''
19'' W
20'' W
22'' W
24'' W
27'' W
30'' W
height
pixels
1024
1024
900
1050
1050
1200
1200
1600
width
pixels
1280
1280
1440
1680
1680
1920
1920
2560










D
diam. (mm)
432
483
483
508
559
610
686
762
height
mm
270
301
256
269
296
323
363
404
width
mm
337
377
409
431
474
517
582
646
Pixelsize
mm
0.263
0.294
0.284
0.256
0.282
0.269
0.303
0.252





-----------
Response 08
-----------

I just bought a 30" to replace a 24". I thought about buying another
24", but I wanted the 1600 pixel height a 30" offers. I do a lot of
drafting, so it seems right. I can work a D-size drawing without zooming
much.

It was a little intimidating when I first set it up, but now I can't
live without it.

I had 2-20" displays a while back, but I don't like the 16x10 displays
that are only 1680x1050. I think the minimum is 24" 1920x1200. For most
people, 2-24" is more cost effective than a 30" and offers better window
management, although tiling 4 windows on a 30" is pretty handy.

One small drawback with a 30" is that it's dual DVI, and not much use
with lesser graphics cards in portables or other computers.

My advice is buy the most pixels you can afford at the lowest cost, and
right now that is dual 24".

Unless you gotta have it.


-----------
Response 09
-----------

We?ve been using two 20? monitors per workstation for three years and
are about to replace our workstations. We will likely go with two
monitors (24? 16:9) this time. Users polled here preferred two monitors
rather than one large one.


----------
Conclusion
----------

The vertical bezels between adjacent monitors bothers me because I use
the monitor management software provided by a graphics card OEM (e.g.
nView Desktop Manager from NVIDIA) to enable window spanning across
multiple displays. Maybe we just need to order an updated monitor model
with a thinner frame so that subjective condition isn't as noticeable ...

There are several considerations to ponder when specifying a monitor
layout including the cost to procure, screen resolution, power
consumption, necessary desk space (which is becoming an issue here),
application behavior, graphics card support, pixel size, display area,
etc.


Regards,

Dustin Neifer
General Dynamics Land Systems








"Dustin Neifer" <->
01/17/2008 12:00 PM
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"Dustin Neifer" <->


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[proesys] - Single Again?





A few years ago the trend to migrate away from single CRT monitors to
multiple (e.g. two or more) LCD monitors began.

Have any of you recently switched back to specifying/ordering single
monitor layouts for your workstations?

It seems to me that having one large-scale (e.g. 24", 27", 30",
etc.) 16:9 aspect ratio LCD monitor is becoming more popular than having
multiple 4:3 aspect ratio LCD monitors.

Pros? Cons? Other comments besides "Gimme four 30" 16:9 LCDs!"?


Regards,

Dustin Neifer
General Dynamics Land Systems






This is an e-mail from General Dynamics Land Systems. It is for the intended recipient only and may contain confidential and privileged information. No one else may read, print, store, copy, forward or act in reliance on it or its attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, please return this message to the sender and delete the message and any attachments from your computer. Your cooperation is appreciated.