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Swx to Creo back to SWX

Re: Swx to Creo back to SWX

I definitely can feel your pain.

We switched to Creo a few years back.  No one can pick up this software and start running unless the work needed done is very simple.  It has been a very hard road, but once through the pain it has been worth it.    We purchased a seat of the Creo Learning Library.  What was suggested to us was to work through numerous specified topics prior to actually getting the 2 days of training that management was OK with.  This accounted to 1 day of overtime per week.

After a couple months of going through the very tedious and unspecific Learning Library, management pulled the plug on overtime for training.  About a year after we started using every free moment we were able to get through the needed sections of the Learning Library to get to our 2 days of training.  At this point we still did 99 percent of our work in ZW which was our software prior to the switch to Creo.  The 2 days of training was a drop in the bucket towards what we needed to get going.  The trainer had one approach towards the project we used for training purposes and it didn't work as our geometry was much too complicated and we needed to be able to identically duplicate the customer's geometry in our model project.  Not really the great fault of the trainer, he had to rush through a part project that had to fit in a 2 day time envelope.

In our company we have been under a lot of pressure to get work done, much of the time we are working overtime to complete hot jobs.  We have always been pinned down to where it is a struggle to put time towards any development.  We almost ended up abandoning Creo after a year and a half.  This was a terribly steep learning curve.  Finally after a year and a half we started piecing things together to how it would work well within our needed geometries scheme.  Once the ball started rolling things really took shape.  Now after a couple years we dread working in our old software because Creo is so much more powerful and quicker.

I believe we are seeing about a 20% time savings over the old software that we were using.  This would be a great success story were in not that our management thinks we are still way too slow.  If only they would take the time to actually see what a lot of part complexity does towards adding time to a project.  In our line of business there is no way to push a button to design a die.  We might be able to get perhaps another 10% faster if we had the time to further refine our technique by learning and using more of the many tools available from Creo's toolbox.

The moral of the story for our situation is that if we had 2 weeks of training we would have cut out 2 years of misery and lack of productivity.  Management has to see that this is the true way of getting return on investment.

Re: Swx to Creo back to SWX

Why wouldn't you take this opportunity to expand on the skills you will carry with you throughout your career?

First of all, what guarantee do you have that the software you use now will look or behave the same in the future as it does now? Long time Pro/E users can attest to the fact that it can change under your feet.

Second, why not take every chance to learn a new software, instead of retreating to what is comfortable? It will do nothing but expand your options when you move to your next position, and make you more valuable to a future employer.

Third, by dumping Pro/E before you have learned what it is really capable of, you will miss out on a truly powerful CAD experience. It is by no means an easy software to learn, but it is worth all of the time you put into it.

In my last 20 years of product/tooling design I have used many CAD programs. CATIA, SW, Inventor, all flavors of AutoCAD, IronCAD, Intergraph, Pro/E....and a few I can't even remember. One company I worked at had a four programs running concurrently. Sure, they all had a learning curve, and all of them approached design theory slightly different, but they are just tools for accomplishing your tasks and conveying your intent.

I am not going to sit here and praise one program over another, because they all have pros and cons - but I will tell you that you will never regret having the confidence to walk into any interview or project and know that no CAD program will keep you from what you do best.

Good luck.

Re: Swx to Creo back to SWX

Not one company I ever interviewed at was using Creo.. Did I mentioned i live and work a few towns over form PTC corp. in  MA. . Everywhere is either swx or Inventor, except a few places that might be holding out using Creo..

It all comes down to the company making money and deliverying projects on time.  No one cares how great of a mathamatical modeler it is.  We have to ME's neither knows the program, its too unituituve with a steep learing curve, we are not producing drawing and designs on time...so.. well.. the project is time slipping.. sooooo... would you want to be the program manager and go to the customer and tell them their proejct will be delayed?   probably not...

If two ME's can get the tools they need to hit the road running at a lower cost than training and get the project done in time is it worth it??  

Re: Swx to Creo back to SWX

Unfortunately the project manager is probably thinking they hired the wrong two ME's.

Please clarify... are you working with SW now?  Are you trying to get your current Creo library converted to SW?  Are you being forced to work in Creo and simply trying to make parametric parts in SW become parametric in Creo?

Again, I feel your frustration.  Maybe a few conversations with human resources to get a better idea of what the project manager is really expecting from you.

Most often, it is the company that doesn't understand what we go through.  And if they think brow-beating while not understanding their role will improve the situation, they are in for a world of hurt.  This means you will be part of that environment.

Re: Swx to Creo back to SWX

Good question, we don't work for the PM ( program manager)  they are customer facing not internal facing.   We both have the skills to do the job, but if I can't get our designs done quick enough the drafting package is really confusing so drawings are near impossible to do without watching videos on how to, then we are goign to lose customers.  IT all comes down to efficentcy<<sp

Any six sigma/ lean training will tell you that if something is taking to long, its casuing money find the root cause.. in our case its the s/w, solution buy something that increase productivity.

.

No we are working with Creo right now,  and we are not looking at the conversion.   we are a very small outfitt maybe 20 people, so HR is not is allso the receptionist and purchaser.   

The major problem is we gorund productivity to a standstill, and there is a major concern that we wil lnot make the delivery date.  We both voiced out frustration on using Creo, but again its being swept under the rug

Re: Swx to Creo back to SWX

Also I'm not defending saying SWX is the one and only soultion, I 've used Inventor and SolidEdge and both are easy to use CAD packages....well.. maybe except SE.. not a fan of it..

Re: Swx to Creo back to SWX

Maybe we should just tackle the top issues you are still dealing with and put them to rest.

This is how we all do it.

Re: Swx to Creo back to SWX

Look at getting a Creo contract engineer to make the date. You and engineer #2 can look over their shoulder to see where the commands are and see how it works. I'd recommend a hands-on interview with the engineer to see they can do the work you need.

If this is machinery, I can typically knock out a from-scratch drawing in about 4 hours - between 30-40 dimensions, notes, sections, breakouts. I rarely use the 'drafting' part because that is time hole and isn't significantly required. If you are sketching or drawing on the drawing, you are mostly doing it wrong, which would be very dissatisfying.

The company could check with their VAR or PTC, or both, for names of people. I also see 3HTI as a supplier of PTC product support, including engineering staffing.

Engineering Staffing (and i'd really appreciate if Jive would not auto-promote web addresses) at  3HTI.com **

They are near the top of the list for Google search result "going from SolidWorks to creo" I didn't see any cross-training; perhaps this is a sliver market for PTC to capture contracts.

Finally - check your browser to turn on spell checking and correction. It's letting you down.

Re: Swx to Creo back to SWX

Also

http://learningexchange.ptc.com/ (requires free account)

https://www.youtube.com/user/ECognition/videos

http://www.e-cognition.net

Beginners Guide - How to Model Almost Anything

https://www.ptcusercommunity.com/docs/DOC-4619 (which may also require a free account)

It includes models, but they may be the educational versions; dunno, but the material is easy enough to read.

Re: Swx to Creo back to SWX

Interesting. If no two designs are ever the same in your company then you might wanna try to find a CAD package that is not feature based and has a decent drawing environment, that is easy to pick up considering your previous experience with SolidWorks, SolidEdge, Inventor, toys like that.

I'm a huge supporter of Multi-CAD and I find that no single CAD/modeling/drafting tool can do a job efficiently enough, while combination of a few can.

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