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Independent Geometry: What's it good for?

KevinBradberry
Participant

Independent Geometry: What's it good for?

Does anyone know how to make use of this command?

independent geometry.PNG

8 REPLIES 8

Re: Independent Geometry: What's it good for?

Hi

I have not used this, but check the link below

I hope you will find something interesting

http://www.ptc.com/cs/cs_24/howto/sct1310/sct1310.htm

Regards

K.Mahanta

Re: Independent Geometry: What's it good for?

Thanks for the link. It shows how to use Independent Geometry to map a surface to "scan data". It was not clear what they meant by scan data. They provided a file for download and the scan data was imported geometry of a set of curves.

Using Independent Geometry, it is possible to fit a flat surface to the imported curves. Sounds powerful, right? I want to experiment more with it later.

Re: Independent Geometry: What's it good for?

Hi

It was not clear what they meant by scan data

Check this link

Its really cool

http://www.faro.com/content.aspx?ct=uk&content=pro&item=1&subitem=0&tab=1

Regards

K.Mahanta

Re: Independent Geometry: What's it good for?

Don't get me wrong, I know how items are scanned. As I understand it, laser scanning produces point clouds that then need to be translated into surfaces, but the part file used in the Independent Geometry tutorial that you posted earlier showed the scan data as a set of curves.

I have to assume that a fan blade was scanned (see the image below from the tutorial) and then analyzed by expensive software (like Geo Magic or Creo has module for this, I think) to create the curve set. If that was the case I would expect the curve set to not have gaps. It makes me wonder if someone threw together some curves, saved it as an iges file, imported back into Creo, and called it "scan data" in order to make it sound like a real world engineering scenario--just a thought.

fan blade.PNG

Re: Independent Geometry: What's it good for?

Hi

Sorry for the misunderstanding

But there are wide range of scanning devices

The devices at the lowest end (which I have once used)creates curves by clicking on vavious points on the surface

Contact Scanners

  • Contact scanners, also called mechanical tracking systems, touch an object with a manual or automatic probe to make physical contact. The probe, as it moves over the object, records positional data in the form of points. This points are then converted to profile curves. Contact scanners have some disadvantages: they are liable to damage the object being scanned due to constant contact with it, and their scanning speed is slow in comparison with other types of 3-D scanning systems.



Read more: 3-D Scanner Types | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/list_6905977_3_d-scanner-types.html#ixzz1nMRIhpwe

Regards

K.Mahanta

Re: Independent Geometry: What's it good for?

Thanks, Kshetrabasi.

Re: Independent Geometry: What's it good for?

There are couple of useful things inside independened geometry.
Already mentioned is the fitting surfaces and curves capability to scan or import data.
I'd only like to emphasize one of my favourite tools here which is the surface -> from surface (formerly snap shot surface) which will create an untrimmed (and independened) surface of a trimmed face, I often use this when fiddling around with imported formats....

Re: Independent Geometry: What's it good for?

c.bernuth wrote:

one of my favourite tools here which is the surface -> from surface (formerly snap shot surface) which will create an untrimmed (and independened) surface of a trimmed face, I often use this when fiddling around with imported formats....

Can you describe this in more depth. Maybe insert a screenshot to go along with it. Thanks.

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