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What's the best way to learn Pro Engineer?

ptc-1927957
1-Newbie

What's the best way to learn Pro Engineer?

So I'm a student, somewhat familiar with AutoCad, but I haven't used ProE at all. I have access to the program at my school. Most employers list ProE experience as a desired job skill. If you wanted to learn ProE, where would you start? The help file? An internet site? Just start playing with features? Amazon.com has a bunch of books on ProE, but they are pricey enough that I would rather not just select one at random. Are there books anyone would recommend? Thanks in advance, and if there is already a topic about this, a link to it would be much appreciated.
10 REPLIES 10

Below is a pasting from another thread on reference books. This is my suggestion for learning Pro/e on your own. There were some other suggestions for reference material in this thread Steve Kowalski Joined: 05 Mar 2007 Posts: 55 Location: Westbury, NY Posted: Thu May 24, 2007 9:15 am Post subject: -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Greg: I sympathize completely! My recommendation (for what it's worth) to learn Pro/E on little or no $. Would be: 1)Buy the student version. 2)Find out what references are available on ebay/amazon, etc. But one of those, maybe one of the Toogood workbooks also. 3) Familarize yourself with the basic commands, making simple parts, assemblies and drawings. Once you've done this, drop it like a 'hot-potato'. 4) Pick a real item to model and create assy's and dwg's. for example: Model your deck or your house, or the lawn mower. Do all the parts down the nails and screws,sheet-rock, etc. The point here is to do something real, don't waste anymore time with these book projects. From my experience, I find that I only really learn new software when I need to use it. At this point use the books only as a referance. I would't waste any time or $ (personal $) on these Pro/E courses, they're all very basic. If can model your own deck or house, you'll have surpassed the skill level you'll acheive from these courses. Once you have these items modeled and dwgs made you'll have somewhat of a portfolio to showcase your skills. From then on, I'd register with a freelance design website (www.cadground, etc)and try to get some freelance work that way. I think if you devoted yourself about 4hrs a day, for about 2months you could be a fairly proficient user. Anyway, just my opinions/suggestions. Best-of-luck! Steve

Hi Joel, When looking for books, search for the author Roger Toogood. I have a handfull of his books and most are very good. I am also teaching myself pro-e. There are plenty of websites that are very good, I use the forums over at MCAD Central regularly and find the members very skilled and helpful. Wayne

Thanks, I will check out the Toogood books and those forums.

try to model some real things such like the cup,the mouse ,the light .There are some video courses showing how the skilled engineers models .you can download some and try to follow them .Best wishes !

I personally think modeling things like cup, glass etc, will limit your skills. This is what happened to me, I learnt Pro/E in a educational course, and during course we used example parts. course went all well, and you think you are pro now. But the real learning place is Job. try getting a part time job, even it doesn't pays well. this is what i think - when there is "need" to make things (need from job) you have to make it right the way it's required.

Gurdeep: I agree 100%. You're only going to really learn Pro/E when you really need to use it!

Joel: I think Gurdeep has a new thinking about learning Pro/E. It's great! But as a tenderfoot,you still need some good books. Toogood's ok!

First off, as a person who spent many years on AutoCAD before switching, forget your old AutoCAD habits. Then, seat time, seat time, seat time. If you REALLY want to learn it, spend as much time as you can on it. It WILL pay off in the job market. Take things that look interesting and complicated to you, take calipers to them, and model them up. Try a couple of different ways to do the same part. Learn what works and what doeasn't. Best of luck.

take a drawing and attack pro/e that is the best way that what i feel.then we will face so many difficulties and we will find so many options..

YOU CAN DOWNLOAD TUTORIALS ' GETTING STARTED PDF FILES' FROM THE PTC RESOURCE CENTRE...ITS DIFFICULT TO START FROM THE ONLINE HELP.. IF YOU WANT TO BECOME EXPERT QUICKLY , I WOULD RECOMMEND YOU TO JOIN SOME TRAINING COURSE...THEN START WORKING ALONG TAKING HELP FROM THE SOFTWARE'S ONLINE HELP

"Joel *beep*" wrote:

So I'm a student, somewhat familiar with AutoCad, but I haven't used ProE at all. I have access to the program at my school. Most employers list ProE experience as a desired job skill. If you wanted to learn ProE, where would you start? The help file? An internet site? Just start playing with features? Amazon.com has a bunch of books on ProE, but they are pricey enough that I would rather not just select one at random. Are there books anyone would recommend? Thanks in advance, and if there is already a topic about this, a link to it would be much appreciated.

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