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customisation of pro e using c programming

maheshmukundan
1-Newbie

customisation of pro e using c programming

hi I am trying to customise some of the pro e functinalities using c programming. is there any one who can help me with a sample code that I can use as my starting guide line mahi
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6 REPLIES 6

mahesh, Before answering your specific question, a general commentary on "programming" in Pro/E. Being the rich and powerful parametric system that it is (I'm NOT in sales), there are many ways and levels to accomplish what we can loosely call "programming" within a Pro/E model, including the following: 1.Relations (Tools/Relations) 2.Pro/PROGRAM (Tools/Program) 3.C Programs (Tools/Relations/Utilities/User Prog) 4.java applets 5.Pro/Toolkit Relations can be used in Sketches, Features, Patterns, Parts, Assemblies and NC Models. In addition, much "programming" can be driven by Family Tables, UDF's, and Interchange Groups. The reason I mention these many tools is that you may or may not want to do what you need with a C Program specifically. If you look at some of the recent history in this Forum you will see much discussion of java applets, which may be a more modern and usable alternative to C, and to Pro/Toolkit. Now to your question: go to the Help drop-down, then Fundamentals/Relations and Parameters/Relations/C Programs and Relations. This includes explanation pages and an example. Good luck! David

mahesh, Forgot to include above that java (J-Link) and Toolkit are accessed with Tools/Auxiliary Applications. The J-Link Users Guide (jlinkug.pdf) can be found in the <loadpoint>/jlink directory. Also, J-Link is free, Toolkit isn't. David

dear David thank you very much. i am quite familiar with relations and family tables and i do use them quite extensively.i dont use udfs much but i can handle them. i did not understand what u actually did mean by interchangeable groups. here i need to do some customisation where i need to get some new menu options and and when i click on them i should get some input boxes where user can make some data entry, based on that entry the programme should search a database pick some data and create some features driven by that data. i can use udfs and family tables for feature creation, and also i can use excel analysis for database searching and related processing. what i really need to get is few special menu options and input tables. i am not quite familiar with java so i dont think i can use j link, but i can play with C, i will have a look at the help document and see whether that will do any help. i got foundation xe license only, does that mean that i can not use pro tool kit chears Mahi

Mahi, Quite honestly, I haven't used J-Link myself yet, but if you start reading the Users Guide you will see (a) discussion of examples similar to what you want to do, and (b) not THAT much difference from C; you might be able to pick it up quickly. I think dialog boxes etc. might be slicker and easier with J-Link. As far as I know, with your license you do NOT have Toolkit. David P.S. Look at a few recent threads for discussion of Interchange Groups. I should have included interchangeable Pattern Tables in my list, as well.

Mahi, From page 1-2 of the , J-Link Users Guide: Using application programs you can make additions to the Pro/ENGINEER user interface, gather or change data associated with the models in session, or add session-level ActionListener routines. See the chapter Action Listeners for more information on ActionListeners. David

Mahi, From an earlier thread: Interchange Assemblies can be really cool! They are usually covered in the second level training course; don't know what's available in Tips and Techniques. Meantime: You have two basic choices: Functional or Simplify (or, more recently, Both). If you set up a Functional IA, you can exchange "real" parts and assemblies (you can mix the two in a group!). You set up a system of "tags" to specify equivalent assembly references, then you can swap different interchangeable parts and assemblies within an assembly. For example, you might set up a variety of effector ends for a robot (simple hook, hydraulic clamp, horse whip, whatever), and then be able to easily swap one for another. If you set up a Simplify IA, you can swap a very simple "blob" for a complicated "real" part or assembly, thus creating a realistic place holder, but lowering the overhead for regeneration, etc. David
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