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Class A Surfaces

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Aquamarine

Class A Surfaces

Hello,

               Is there a way, a source, a book or a method to learn to create Class A surfaces?


​Thank you.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
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Re: Class A Surfaces

It's a lot of both Ruben....Subjective and Explicit.

True Class A modeling is the endeavor to capture design intent as closely and as accurately to the intent object as possible with numerical verification ability. Notice I said closely AND accurately. This is the point I made about the task being both subjective and explicit. The subjective aspect is what the you are "seeing" on the screen as you model. I.E the pretty surfaces with nice highlights, zebra stripes, etc... These surfaces might look really awesome  but might not be anywhere close to the actual intent (scan) surfaces created by the Designer. This is where Creo falls down with regard to Class A modeling. We have no tool, method or mechanism to easily ensure both the subjective AND the accuracy of our surfacing in Creo in the true sense of Class A modeling. The ability to precisely control G2 curvature. G3 acceleration and surface (local region and global) fullness (node manipulation) in all directions with smoothing/parsing is critical for Class A. Can we get close, lucky and or good with Creo? Yes. Can we create some stunning and cool stuff? Yes. However, Creo, and this includes Style and Freeform, is NOT, was NOT and never will be a Class A surfacing tool in the true sense of the term. We cannot fault the software for something it was never meant to be.

Creo "Class A" modeling is more a visual, subjective activity than it is a mathematically rigorous activity.True Class A is equal measures of both Art and Mathematics. We do not have good or easy control over curve degree, the ability to smooth/parse,, add patches and then smooth them into the main surfaces, a highlight turntable, the list goes on... Typically, people that have a "Designers Eye" or training in Industrial Design will create surfaces with nuance and sweetness that most others will simply not consider but they will notice if its "missing". It's what I call the "Juice", it's that extra "something" that makes that particular thing really beautiful. When you get an opportunity go find a new vehicle sitting outside in the sunshine and start walking around it. Watch how the sunlight flows along the surfaces and does not wave or ripple. Pay attention to the creases in the body work and how they reflect the highlight. Look at the flow from one panel/component to another. All that work is done by a Class A modeler in a Class A tool like Catia, Alias, ICEM or NX. We do not have the ability to do that degree of work in Creo.

I keep getting asked to "train" people in surfacing which I may do at some point. Unfortunately I am still a Working Stiff and have little time to devote to brick and mortar "classes". I have conducted training via one on one with WebEx if anyone is interested. Let me know.


View solution in original post

3 REPLIES 3
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Re: Class A Surfaces

But isn't this something a little bit subjective? I often see that those surfaces are called G2/G3, the only thing you need is to edit the spline accordingly. Anyway, A G2 learning source will be enough for me also.

Highlighted

Re: Class A Surfaces

It's a lot of both Ruben....Subjective and Explicit.

True Class A modeling is the endeavor to capture design intent as closely and as accurately to the intent object as possible with numerical verification ability. Notice I said closely AND accurately. This is the point I made about the task being both subjective and explicit. The subjective aspect is what the you are "seeing" on the screen as you model. I.E the pretty surfaces with nice highlights, zebra stripes, etc... These surfaces might look really awesome  but might not be anywhere close to the actual intent (scan) surfaces created by the Designer. This is where Creo falls down with regard to Class A modeling. We have no tool, method or mechanism to easily ensure both the subjective AND the accuracy of our surfacing in Creo in the true sense of Class A modeling. The ability to precisely control G2 curvature. G3 acceleration and surface (local region and global) fullness (node manipulation) in all directions with smoothing/parsing is critical for Class A. Can we get close, lucky and or good with Creo? Yes. Can we create some stunning and cool stuff? Yes. However, Creo, and this includes Style and Freeform, is NOT, was NOT and never will be a Class A surfacing tool in the true sense of the term. We cannot fault the software for something it was never meant to be.

Creo "Class A" modeling is more a visual, subjective activity than it is a mathematically rigorous activity.True Class A is equal measures of both Art and Mathematics. We do not have good or easy control over curve degree, the ability to smooth/parse,, add patches and then smooth them into the main surfaces, a highlight turntable, the list goes on... Typically, people that have a "Designers Eye" or training in Industrial Design will create surfaces with nuance and sweetness that most others will simply not consider but they will notice if its "missing". It's what I call the "Juice", it's that extra "something" that makes that particular thing really beautiful. When you get an opportunity go find a new vehicle sitting outside in the sunshine and start walking around it. Watch how the sunlight flows along the surfaces and does not wave or ripple. Pay attention to the creases in the body work and how they reflect the highlight. Look at the flow from one panel/component to another. All that work is done by a Class A modeler in a Class A tool like Catia, Alias, ICEM or NX. We do not have the ability to do that degree of work in Creo.

I keep getting asked to "train" people in surfacing which I may do at some point. Unfortunately I am still a Working Stiff and have little time to devote to brick and mortar "classes". I have conducted training via one on one with WebEx if anyone is interested. Let me know.


View solution in original post

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Re: Class A Surfaces

This is why PTC CAD products have not been used extensively in the styling business, automotive, aerospace, consumer products, etc. Internal parts, model surfaces that don't require a 'perfect' G3 curvature are doable. If you want G3 on your CAD model, use NX or Catia.

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