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use of pro-E

ptc-4328935
1-Newbie

use of pro-E

can anybody explain about pro-E use in the work. like what types of works can be done with pro-E in automotive, aerospace industry, or any other industry, and how much growth in career we can expect with pro-E skills.

thanks,

shankar

8 REPLIES 8

Shankar literally you can do almost anything mechanical or electrical in Pro/ENGINEER. The software is used in every major manufacturing and engineering industry. The suite of tools offered with Creo grows everyday. No one will be able to list all the possiblities.

To quote from the fine cinematic masterpiece "Blades of Glory"... "if you can dream it... you can do it!"

Your career potential in Pro/ENGINEER is nearly limitless. Creo isn't going anywhere anytime soon. Despite the various rumors that are occasionally floated by PTC's competitors, the company is strong and the product line is stable. You can make a very nice living using these software tools. PTC's products are very powerful but they can be a little hard to learn. Experienced, trained users who understand the idiosyncrasies of the tools and how to use them to maximum benefit are ALWAYS needed.

Good luck..

-Brian

Thanks Brian for the answer.

but, just i want to know little more clearly, so can you or anybody explain with some examples of using pro-E

in aerospace or automotive sectors using pro-E technology/tools. if you give 2-3 examples, it will help me.

i have just learned pro-E, but not worked anywhere, so, i am curious and excited to work in different types of applications using the skills i learnt.

thanks,

shankar

Hi Shankar...

I've worked in many industries so I have a pretty good cross-section of experience. Here are some examples from my own career.

- Used Pro/E to design electrical connectors for automobile airbags. These were small, injection molded plastic parts with gold plated metal pins inserted. The pins were designed in Pro/E sheetmetal and were stamped on an industrial tool and die machine. The mold for the plastic part was designed in Pro/MOLD. The various pieces of the mold were manufactured using Pro/MANUFACTURING on CNC (computer controlled) milling machines. The assembly of the final product (plastic molded pieces + pins) was documented using Pro/PROCESS which allowed us to document each step of the assembly.

- Used Pro/E to design a high voltage lithium ion battery pack for use in one of the next generation NATO strike fighters. Pro/SHEETMETAL was used to design pieces of the battery case shell. Pro/ENGINEER was used to design the battery components. Pro/CBALING was used to create harnesses and wiring for the assembly. Mechanica was used to perform structural, thermal, and vibration analysis on the final part.

- Used Pro/E to contribute to the design of a "IED hardened" armored vehiclesfor use by US and Iraqi forces. Pro/CABLING was used to route communication harnesses. Pro/E was used to design crew seating and restraints, upgraded armor for the vehicle, provisions for NBC (nuclear, biological, chemical) filtration and climate control. Pro/MANUFACTURING was used to fabricate components of the vehicle. Windchill PDMLINK was used to control all documentation releases and preserve project data.

- Used Pro/E to automate the design of biotech filtration equipment. Utilized Pro/PROGRAM to accept a series of inputs which were used to drive the design of pumps, motors, piping, and filtration components. Assembly documentation and drawings were automatically created based on these inputs without manual intervention. New designs which previously took months to create could be iterated within a week using this technique.

- Used Pro/E to design a unique dual propulsion system for a satellite science mission. Pro/CABLING was used to route the various wiring harnesses throughout the system. Pro/PIPING was used to route hydrazine and xenon gas lines throughout the spacecraft. Various Ansys and Mechanica analyzes were performed to test structural and thermal performance of the assembly. Used Pro/ENGINEER to simulate the motion of thruster engines and generate keep-out zones. This spacecraft is currently orbiting Vesta. (See "Dawn" project).

These are just a few possibilities. I don't know how much more detail I can give. Literally, Pro/E can be used for almost anything... major aerospace, defense, and automotive industries use it for innumerable purposes. You can find tons of examples by simply performing a Google search on Pro/E and keywords like "aerospace" and "automotive".

For years PTC User ran a competition called Pro/AWARD (which eventually changed to "PTC Awards") which featured dozens upon dozens of examples of cool projects done in Pro/ENGINEER. I don't think they still do it but here's a link to past years' winners.

http://www.ptc.com/appserver/mkt/ptcawards/index.jsp

This should give you more than enough to work with!

Good luck!

-Brian

Thanks brian.

I am a mechanical engineer. some examples you gave will help me.

i have worked on sketches, part,sheetmetal, drawings and assembly in pro-E.

as you are very experienced, can you tell me which areas i have to focus more and learn more to find job in this competitive market.

pl don't mind. as i am a beginner, i am asking these basic queries.

shankar.

Hi Shankar...

I don't mind your questions. That's why the PTC Community is here... to answer questions and collaborate.

To be marketable in the Creo (Pro/E) Universe you'll need to be competent and experienced with all basic functions. This means you'll need to be well versed in sketches, part modeling, simple assemblies, and drawing creation. This is the bare minimum you must have.

Many companies want users experienced in managing large assemblies. Large assemblies can tax the resources of a worksation. There are numerous strategies for minimizing the resources required to work on large assemblies. For example, Simplified Representations and layering are heavily relied upon in large assembly management. If you delve even deeper into advanced tools like Skeletons, Copy Geometry, Shrinkwraps, Envelopes, and Inheritance Features you'll be much more desirable to future employers.

You have to have a good basic level of competence in many of these areas to be a desirable candidate for most companies. Many companies still require engineers and designers to make their own drawings... so an understanding of ASME/ANSI standards and Military/Dept. of Defense standards is also helpful.

If you're looking for one specific area of Pro/E and Creo to focus your efforts upon, I suggest Routed Systems. Specifically, users with Pro/CABLING experienced are very sought after. This is a specialized niche area of the software that relatively few users understand. The vast majority of Pro/CABLING users have only taken basic training from PTC and have used the package very lightly. Experienced Pro/CABLING users are very hard to find.

My advice, therefore, would be to become completely proficient with the basics. Then, expand your knowledge to advanced assembly techniques and large assembly management. Finally, once you have those under your belt, take a basic Pro/CABLING course and proceed to develop your knowledge of Pro/CABLING and routed systems.

Good luck!

-Brian

Hi Shankar,

A question for you: are you 1) a mechanical engineer who knows how to use Pro/E; or 2) a Pro/E operator who knows some engineering?

I'm 1): I'm an engineer who designs hardware that provides solutions for a customer's requirements, and Pro/E is one of the tools that I use to help me do this. I also use Excel, AutoCAD, several bits of in-house software, a pencil and paper, and a Casio calculator.

Other people do make a living as 2), but it's a different career path - and they're usually contractors rather than permanent employees. The days of 'engineers' and 'draughtsmen' being separate roles are mostly gone.

Personally, I would look for a job in a sector that interests you (that could be medical equipment, power generation, aerospace, transportation, manufacturing machinery... you name it) and don't get too hung up on what CAD software a company uses. If you've learnt Pro/E, you could also learn Catia, or SW, or whatever; and if you're going for a permanent position, any decent company should train you.

Thanks Mr. Jonathan.
I am a mechanical engineer. i have just learnt pro-E. not worked anywhere. looking for job anywhere in india.

shankar.

VladimirN
23-Emerald IV
(To:ptc-4328935)

shankar k wrote:

...what types of works can be done with pro-E in automotive, aerospace industry...

Maybe these links will help:

http://www.ptc.com/industry/automotive

http://www.ptc.com/industry/aerospace-and-defense

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