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relations in assemblies

SOLVED

relations in assemblies

I've received an assembly containing a lot of relations.

A lot of them are looking something like : d100:99=d122.

So, d122 is a dimension in the main assembly, ok.

But is it possible to find what is the part or sub-assembly corresponding to ":99" ?

I can display the dimension, but don't know where it's coming from.

Thanks,

(Creo2)

 

 

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1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions

Re: relations in assemblies

Ken is right, even session IDs are parts, odd ones are assemblies.  Parts start with 0, however, not 2 and since they are even only the 12th part retrieved will be session ID 22.

 

One easy way to get which part is which session ID is to create a drawing using your assy. No need for a format or any views, simply create a note with the following text:

 

0 - &model_name:0
1 - &model_name:1
2 - &model_name:2

This should show the Creo model name (file name) of each part and assy. Add enough lines to cover all the models in your assy.  You may want to save it as a text file for easy use again.

 

--
Doug Schaefer | Engineering Manager
Crow Works
6 REPLIES 6

Re: relations in assemblies

Here's what I've found about those magical Session IDs.

Odd numbers are assemblies, even numbers are parts.

If you start a new session of Creo, then open the assembly you are investigating with nothing else in memory, Creo will assign the numbers sequentially as it pulls in parts. First assembly opened is 1, next is 3, etc. The same is true for parts; first is 2, next is 4, etc. I think, but I'm not 100% sure, that the sequence of numbers start at the top of your model tree and go on from there. You can check this out by counting down in the tree and seeing if, for example, the part with ID 12 is the 12th in the list, etc.

On a side note, I've had similar experiences with these things. 90% of the difficulty is that "d100" doesn't mean anything. When they show people how to do relations, emphasis should be placed on the value of renaming the dimensions being used so they *mean* something. "d23" is nothing, "diaHub" gets you a long way towards knowing what that variable does. These are the gripes of a guy who has had to edit his fellow engineers' horrible FORTRAN code in the olden times.

If you want to check what the Session ID is for a particular component, use the Show->Session ID functionality within the relations window (just in case you didn't use that, yet).

Re: relations in assemblies

Ken is right, even session IDs are parts, odd ones are assemblies.  Parts start with 0, however, not 2 and since they are even only the 12th part retrieved will be session ID 22.

 

One easy way to get which part is which session ID is to create a drawing using your assy. No need for a format or any views, simply create a note with the following text:

 

0 - &model_name:0
1 - &model_name:1
2 - &model_name:2

This should show the Creo model name (file name) of each part and assy. Add enough lines to cover all the models in your assy.  You may want to save it as a text file for easy use again.

 

--
Doug Schaefer | Engineering Manager
Crow Works

Re: relations in assemblies

That's a cool trick, Doug. I'm going to have to do that. I could do a quick screen grab of the results then have it in a window while I'm writing relations. Once I get beyond a dozen parts or so I forget which number applies to which and have to do the tedious inquiry thing again.

Re: relations in assemblies

What a nice solution Doug.
As always when you publish something !
Thanks

Re: relations in assemblies

I didn't know this : Show->Session ID 
It's also a good solution.
Thanks

Re: relations in assemblies

Glad I could help.

 

Relations > Show > session ID is great of you want to know the session ID of a component, but not of much use if you know the session ID and need to find the component.

--
Doug Schaefer | Engineering Manager
Crow Works