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Verify the center of multiple axis in an assembly

Verify the center of multiple axis in an assembly

We have an assembly with multiple plates and hundreds of holes between them. Is there a simple way to verify the center of all these holes are lined up to each other, across multiple parts?


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2 REPLIES 2

RE: Verify the center of multiple axis in an assembly

Damian,


Do you want numerical verification or can you live with a visual? Visual is easy, and even eaiser if the holes are on the same plane. Simply view the holes with the axes and their tags "on" and it will be very easy to see if they line up.



But, if you need numerical verification itwill be more difficult and tedious. I do not know of an "automatic" way to do this but....If the holes are in a pattern you could add points to both parts (mating surfaces)as Ref patterns and then measure distance between cooresponding points in the model tree (I.E. not selecting them in the work area). Then you can see if the net measurements are zeros. Even if the holes are not patterned you can use this method. It's just more painful to add the points.


Otherwise, maybe someone with some programming skills can suggest another method.

Verify the center of multiple axis in an assembly

This will require a little Excel manipulation, but it may work.


1. Create a Publish Geometry in each plate, selecting datums, and, using the binoculars, grab all axes. Exclude as required.

2. Create a skeleton part at the highest assembly that has all of the plates. If one exists, create a second one. (I think >= WF5)

3. Activate the skeleton and create a Copy Geom for each of the above Publish Geometry

4. Export the skeleton to an IGES file. (This may be the first time I recommended IGES since the 90's)

5. Open the IGES file in Excel and extract the rows pertaining to the axes. They will have a starting point and an ending point, varying in Z only.

6. Manipulate Excel to sort by X and determine some minimum offset to flag a potential issue.

Here is a look at Excel with no axis offsets. 3 parts with 5 holes each. The parts are 2 inches thick and stacked, creating the Z offset.

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