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sketcher mode, equal dimensions

ptc-267878
1-Newbie

sketcher mode, equal dimensions

wf4


In sketcher mode, is there a way to make several dimensions of equal value? If you look at the attached example, is there a way to make one 1.5 dimension equal/dependent on the other 1.5 dimension?


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11 REPLIES 11

If you are in WF5 (WF4 too??) you can use the "equals" constraint on
dimensions as well as entities.



-Nate


Hmmm.

If it doesn't work in WF4, I have (in WF2 and earlier) added lines normal
to the "wall thickness" and set them to construction lines and dimension one
of them and set the construction lines equal length.

verstehen?

kapisch?

entiendo?




thanks. i think sketcher relations will do the trick

Nope - doesn't work in WF4:








The equal constraint doesn't work on dims in WF4, that was new in WF5.



However, you can create relations in sketcher. Click tools -> relations
and the dims will flip to show their symbols and you can write a
relation like sd1=sd2.



That said, I don't like to use them because while they do what you want,
they are a 'buried' driver of design intent. What I mean is when
editing the feature; it isn't obvious what's driving that dim. Not only
do I have to actually go into the sketch, I have to then go into the
relations to see what's happening. Relations have their place, but if I
can create the design intent without them, I will - especially sketcher
relations.



I try to use construction geometry where ever I can to drive things like
this. In your example, a construction circle on the intersection of the
two lines and tangent to both references would make those distances
equal and eliminate one of the dims.



(Phooey, while I was typing I see that Nathan essentially posted the
same suggestion. :-S)



Doug Schaefer
--
Doug Schaefer | Experienced Mechanical Design Engineer
LinkedIn

I vote for the construction line method - it is more visible and accessible
than relations for fixing when it breaks.


I second that vote!!! Sketcher relations are definitely "hidden intent"

Steve Williams
Pro/E Version 15/16 (Circa 1995/1996)

i see the difference. construction lines are definitely the way to go!

But you added the construction circle method - what I use for equally
spacing features - holes along a rectangular flange for example.


llie
14-Alexandrite
(To:ptc-267878)

Nathan,

It is not possible in WF4, but is in WF5. In WF4 you can only add your
line, throw dimension and make them both the same number by typing it in.



Lance J Lie
Information Technology
SAS IT Info. Solutions App. Eng.
Space and Airborne Systems
Raytheon Company

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BrentDrysdale
5-Regular Member
(To:ptc-267878)

Hi DL,
I saw the other WF5 answer and I did not know that trick.
I have used the other construction line method (still do in WF5) and was
typing about that as I did not initially see the other very good answers.

However I can add that you can go further with those construction lines and
use them to control a sort of pattern in a sketch. Always with the proviso
that you want to be careful over how complex you make a sketch. At least
with this complexity though you can see exactly how something is
constrained.


Regards,

*Brent Drysdale*
*Senior Design Engineer*
Tait Communications
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