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FOSI DOES format right-to-left languages and has for decades

ptc-1908075
1-Newbie

FOSI DOES format right-to-left languages and has for decades


Please pass it along: FOSI DOES support right-to-left languages. In fact,I found information online that supports my recollection that CJK composition was supported fairly early on.Paul Grosso posted in 1999 that composed output of CJK was available with Adept 8.1/Global (for UNIX). PC support for composed output of CJK was available inEpic 4.3, which was releasedin 2002. According tothe release notes:

"Epic Editor now composes to print, Preview, and PDF documents that are writtenin Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, Japanese, and Korean."

You can search the Help Center for Arabic, etc., to see other right-to-left languages are also supported by FOSI.

Note that I developed a FOSI for Arabic output in 2006 and worked on a CJK FOSI a few years before that.

Suzanne Napoleonwww.FOSIexpert.com"WYSIWYG is last-century technology!"
2 REPLIES 2

CJK languages are not right-to-left. The right-to-left language grouping is typically referred to as HAT – Hebrew, Arabic, Thai. Does FOSI support HAT?

For the benefit of the thread, I can confirm that APP supports:

1. CJK, including top-bottom mode for traditional Chinese and Japanese. Also including special Japanese features such as Ruby, embedded Romaji oriented vertically or horizontally, handling of prohibited start/end-of-line characters.

2. Hebrew/Arabaic – there was a special Arabic version of APP and its features were rolled into the mainline APP many versions ago. There are many special needs of Arabic besides RTL, such as special character forms for first/middle/last positions.

3. Thai – support for this was added more recently. A unique feature of Thai is that no spaces exist between words. For line breaking purposes, the typesetting system must use a dictionary of Thai words to figure out where the allowable word breaks are. APP does this and breaks Thai at least as well as modern web browsers.

For anyone into more esoteric typesetting it is also worth noting that while Arbortext (including APP) supports Unicode this support is limited to the “Basic Multilingual Plane” encoded as UTF-8 or UTF-16. UTF-32 and UTF-16 surrogate pairs are not supported.

-Gareth
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