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ISO & ASME standards for same part

JohnMattson
1-Newbie

ISO & ASME standards for same part


We do all of our domestic-based documentation (i.e. drawings) following ASME standards. We are starting to come across scenarios though where we need parts manufactured in Eastern Europe and they generally use ISO. In some ways these standards are very different (e.g. tolerancing). We also have a new Engineering center in the region, and those employees would rather work in ISO, which would make it difficult for us to pass work back and forth, as will be needed.

One idea is that for a drawing that needs to be design, reviewed and manufacturing in both ASME and ISO regions of the world we would create both an ASME and ISO drawing for the same model. Does anyone do something similar to this, or do you have any other ideas for addressing this situation?

Thanks, John




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In Reply to John Mattson:


The answer somewhat depends on what you are manufacturing. Generally machined parts are easier to handle than fabricated parts. I am currently working on a project where we are doing parallel manufacturing in North America and Europe. For our fabricated parts I duplicated the design in order to modify material thicknesses (.250" became .236" which is the equivalent of 6 mm plate). For the drawings I just turned on dual dimensioning and display only secondary dimensions. For machined or cast parts you could probably just get away with duplicating the drawing and changing the dimension display to create your metric version.

Chris Trummer

We do all of our domestic-based documentation (i.e. drawings) following ASME standards. We are starting to come across scenarios though where we need parts manufactured in Eastern Europe and they generally use ISO. In some ways these standards are very different (e.g. tolerancing). We also have a new Engineering center in the region, and those employees would rather work in ISO, which would make it difficult for us to pass work back and forth, as will be needed.

One idea is that for a drawing that needs to be design, reviewed and manufacturing in both ASME and ISO regions of the world we would create both an ASME and ISO drawing for the same model. Does anyone do something similar to this, or do you have any other ideas for addressing this situation?

Thanks, John



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