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How to create machining model from the casting model used as parent model?

How to create machining model from the casting model used as parent model?

Like when I was trying to create machining model from the casting model which (casting model) is used as parent model for the machining model. Like when ever you try to open a machining model from that model we can open the casting model. Such that any changes done in the casting model will be regenerated and the changes also applied to machining model. Also the machining model losses its reference or trace how to add the casting model. Without casting model I can't proceed with machining model. So I couldn't find a proper way to do this process.

Likewise while using Solidworks, the similar process is done by opening a new model and then go to insert-->Part-->select the particular casting model as parent model for the machining and after the machining model is created. And also if the references are lost by clicking open option---->select the machining model--->references--->double clicking the parent model which will be in green color so that we change it to the original or add the parent model to the machining model such way the references can be brought back while opening the machining model if it has some error.

Please provide me a better option to do this in creo parametric 3.0/4.0/5.0/6.0 like that I've done in solidworks. Since I have to model this in creo parametric I am expecting a reply from your side.

Thanks,
Vishnu Vignesh N

4 REPLIES 4

Re: How to create machining model from the casting model used as parent model?

What you are looking for is called inheritance.

 

Create a blank part model for the machined version.  Then, in the Model tab, click "Get Data" > "Merge/Inheritance".  Click the folder icon and browse to the as-cast model.  Then use a default constraint to place it.  Be sure to click the "Toggle Inheritance" button before completing the feature to get inheritance rather than a merge.

 

The machining cuts can then be added after the inheritance feature.  If the cast model changes, you can right-click on the inheritance feature and select "Update Inheritance".

 

Note that I've successfully defined castings as described above, but I've also done them in reverse.  Meaning I sometimes start with a machined/finished model and then inherit an as-cast model from it.  Features for extra stock can be added to the as-cast version.  Which method you choose depends mostly on design intent and what type of future changes you expect.

 

-Doug

Re: How to create machining model from the casting model used as parent model?

You could do the inheritance thing, but I've moved away from that as I've had serious issues with layers.  Me, I make it a family table model with one instance the casting, and the other the finished machining.  This way the layers always work, there is never the possibility that the wrong revision Master model is in session, and it's all contained in one file.  Simple, robust, effective.

Re: How to create machining model from the casting model used as parent model?

When I've had casting models that are subsequently machined, this is the method I've used, too. Particularly nice for do Creo Manufacturing, because the workpiece (the casting version) will always line up perfectly with the reference model (the machined version). Plus, if you're really being fancy and carefully put in your final features for the machined part, you can generate versions that reflect different stages of manufacture. Very useful for developing tooling or for making pictures for production personnel.

Re: How to create machining model from the casting model used as parent model?

Hey Ken!  The only thing that could get sticky is datum structure and GD&T if you tried to reuse datum names.  But, for me that's not an issue since I use specific datums just for the casting, and once certain surfaces are machined to to casing datums, I use those exclusively for all other machining.  But, like you, I find this the best, fastest, and most robust way.