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Simulation copy/version of model using Windchill

ilyachaban
12-Amethyst

Simulation copy/version of model using Windchill

Hello, 

is there any good practice how to create simulation copy/version of model using windchill? Now I'm doing it by copying all the parts. So it creates independent model which i don't like. Is there any way how to connect/ create a simulation version of the model using windchill?

 

 

 

 

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
dnordin
15-Moonstone
(To:ilyachaban)

I would recommend that you don't create a separate model for analysis purposes if possible. It avoids a lot of issues with synchronizing separate models, Windchill, etc. This assumes you have modify access to the models.

 

If you must create separate analysis models, there are a few techniques that can be used.

 

1. For part models or very simple assembly models, you can create a new simulation part model and then create inheritance features of the original model(s) [Model tab - Get Data group]. This will allow you to create your simulation setup without modifying the original part. Updating the inheritance feature can be automatic or manual if there any changes to the original part. The inheritance feature will also allow you to suppress features if you need to de-feature the simulation model. For model naming, if the original part is abc.prt, the simulation model can be called abc_sim.prt to make searching easy. Unfortunately, it's not possible to create an inheritance feature of an assembly, so you need to inherit each part individually, and rebuild the assembly. The isn't too bad for small assemblies, but can be a big chore for larger or complex assemblies.

 

2. Similar to the inheritance feature, you can do the same with external copy geometry and select the bodies. Each external reference can come into the simulation model as a separate body.

 

3. For larger assemblies, you can look at a process similar to the above, except create an external shrinkwrap feature in the simulation part. You can bring in the whole assembly at once, but they will come in as quilts, not solids. You have to solidify all the quilts individually (and assign each to a body if desired), but this solidify only needs to be done once. You can update the shrinkwrap manually if any of the original models have changed.

 

4. For larger assemblies, you can look at exporting the model to a neutral format like STEP/IGES and then importing this into a new simulation model. You can use the ATB (associative topology bus) to update the simulation model if the original models have changed. This works, but it requires more data management either inside or outside of Windchill, and your simulation references may require rebuilding.  The import features may require some editing/fixing to get solid models.  Not the best option in my opinion.

 

These techniques all result in a new separate model that can be managed separately from the original models while allowing you to update geometry as needed.

 

Regards,

 

Dan N.

View solution in original post

1 REPLY 1
dnordin
15-Moonstone
(To:ilyachaban)

I would recommend that you don't create a separate model for analysis purposes if possible. It avoids a lot of issues with synchronizing separate models, Windchill, etc. This assumes you have modify access to the models.

 

If you must create separate analysis models, there are a few techniques that can be used.

 

1. For part models or very simple assembly models, you can create a new simulation part model and then create inheritance features of the original model(s) [Model tab - Get Data group]. This will allow you to create your simulation setup without modifying the original part. Updating the inheritance feature can be automatic or manual if there any changes to the original part. The inheritance feature will also allow you to suppress features if you need to de-feature the simulation model. For model naming, if the original part is abc.prt, the simulation model can be called abc_sim.prt to make searching easy. Unfortunately, it's not possible to create an inheritance feature of an assembly, so you need to inherit each part individually, and rebuild the assembly. The isn't too bad for small assemblies, but can be a big chore for larger or complex assemblies.

 

2. Similar to the inheritance feature, you can do the same with external copy geometry and select the bodies. Each external reference can come into the simulation model as a separate body.

 

3. For larger assemblies, you can look at a process similar to the above, except create an external shrinkwrap feature in the simulation part. You can bring in the whole assembly at once, but they will come in as quilts, not solids. You have to solidify all the quilts individually (and assign each to a body if desired), but this solidify only needs to be done once. You can update the shrinkwrap manually if any of the original models have changed.

 

4. For larger assemblies, you can look at exporting the model to a neutral format like STEP/IGES and then importing this into a new simulation model. You can use the ATB (associative topology bus) to update the simulation model if the original models have changed. This works, but it requires more data management either inside or outside of Windchill, and your simulation references may require rebuilding.  The import features may require some editing/fixing to get solid models.  Not the best option in my opinion.

 

These techniques all result in a new separate model that can be managed separately from the original models while allowing you to update geometry as needed.

 

Regards,

 

Dan N.

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