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Is this basic assembly & skeleton hierarchy correct?

ptc-3165381
1-Newbie

Is this basic assembly & skeleton hierarchy correct?

Assembly File |_____The top-level skeleton - Outline and Critical Dims |_____First Assembly File _________Its skeleton includes details _________Actual Part Models |_____Second Assembly File _________Its skeleton includes details _________Actual Part Models |_____And so on. 1) Is there a better way to do this? (Is this hierachy correct?) I eventually want to be able to open the individual assemblies to work with them (for detail and minor changes) but I need to drive any major changes from the top level.
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9 REPLIES 9

That's the way I do it, and copy geom to from the skeleton to make make the individual parts. Rick

In addition to Skeletons, be sure and check out Pro/Notebook aka Layout, if you haven't before. You can include a lot of key driving values without even creating geometry.

Not sure what your skeleton contains, but we use ours to create 2d or 3d surfaces with all the details (i.e. holes, bend, rounds). This way you can see your "assembly" of parts before you actually create the .prt or .asm files. To create a part just insert copy geom surface quilt) from skel at the default location. If the quilt is 2d you can thicken it. If it's a sheet metal part you can then assign your first wall and flatten it. If it's 3d just solidify it. Then in your assembly simply insert all your parts one by one at the default location. Simple, no dependency btw parts... Good luck

That is the structure I'm going with in my assembly file, and I'm pleased I'd understood the program well enough to put at least a hierarchy correctly together.

You can also create a motion skeleton before creating the design skeleton, that adds even more fun to the mix. That way you can analyze it mechanisim to find forces, then go into mechanica and do a stress analysis.

Is it possible to move a part from one assembly file to another (parallel or higher up file) without regenerating it from scratch? I do not want to loose my 'solidify'd' solids. Assembly File [TO HERE] |_____The top-level skeleton - Outline and Critical Dims |_____First Assembly File _________Its skeleton includes details _________Actual Part Models here [FROM HERE]

I think this can be done with RESTRUCTURE. ***Proceed with caution***

Yes it works, moving parts from one assy to another assy, if that was the question.

u can also have the same skeleton in the top level assembly as in the subassemblies, this way u have access to the skeleton from the top level and from with in the subassemblies. i am assuming u have multiple parts/assemblies being driven from this skeleton, so what u can also do is in ur skeleton u can group the features u make for the specific subassemblies, u can rename the group to be the part/assembly number, and this way its very easy to keep track of what features control what. layouts are also very handy when using skeletons as mentioned above. Carlos
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