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PTC- Creo certification program

Newbie

PTC- Creo certification program

I need certificate form PTC for creo.
I need to know how to apply.
Exam fee.
I need to know exam model questions.
Please answer to my question.

3 REPLIES 3

Re: PTC- Creo certification program

PTC does not have a certification program for Creo. Perhaps a local college offers a suitable course.

 

I don't see how it would work. A useful test would take about 2 weeks of 8 hour days.

 

It looks like Pearson offers a certificate: http://www.pearsonvue.com/ptc/

"Creo Certifications

PTC University’s Creo Certification Program offers certifications of expertise in the effective usage for Creo Parametric in a mechanical design environment. The Creo certification exam validates a candidate’s ability to model using Creo Parametric. Candidates apply core Creo Parametric Modules to effectively model mechanical designs.

  • Creo Parametric for Design Engineers through Pearson VUE authorized test centres in India and SAARC
  • PTC Creo for Designers at academic partner locations of PTC University in India"

Re: PTC- Creo certification program

I have many local Silicon Valley engineers and designers ask me this and I hope that someday PTC will do that. There are options that people might like to know about that I have used. De Anza College offers Creo classes with a certificate and the 12 week classes are offered online and live in class. This CAD department has been around for over 25 years and the current Creo teacher is a former PTC trainer who really knows his stuff.

www.deanza.edu/dmt/cad/creo/index.html

www.deanza.edu/dmt/cad/index.html

 

Re: PTC- Creo certification program

Back when it mattered for me, I always wanted PTC to have a certification program, like there is for IT guys with Microsoft, networking etc.  I'd heard that for a while PTC actually DID have a certification process, but I also heard that employers refused to value these users and didn't pay them anything more for having the certification, unlike in the IT world where you ARE paid for the certification.  Where I am now, it doesn't matter, so  don't care anymore.

 

On a similar note, but far more important, I feel accredited colleges absolutely NEED to have some sort of "CAD" degree.  I mean, you can become a packaging Engineer for example, and get a 4 year degree in the design of cardboard boxes and plastic clamshells.  SRSLY?  So why can't we have a CAD degree which involves proficiency with CAD, vaulting systems, minor programming (relations), a certain level of math proficiency, and a certain level of non-planar geometry proficiency.  For the most part, I do a lot of work that would be considered an Engineer's work, but since I don't have the 4 year degree, I don't get paid at that level and certainly don't get any recognition for it.  We need something better than the 2 year degree you might be able to get at, say, a community college.  Thank God where I work now I can actually advance and am paid well instead of being stuck like in my last "perm" job.

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