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More Automated Way in modeling threads in Creo

bharito
2-Guest

More Automated Way in modeling threads in Creo

Is there a more direct way of modeling standard threads in Creo other than the existing way which is fully manual? I wish there was a more automated way, for example some type of a wizard utility box allowing for filling-in the thread parameters. People might ask why bother and model standard threads, when the whole technical community is based on having them as given to any manufacturing cell, as long as they are specified and noted correctly on the drawings for the machinist to make? However, sometime we do care about 3-d printing and would like to make sure that the threaded mated parts are within allowance. What is the best practice to model the threads with the existing software? Again, I wish there are plans for any enhancements in the future versions in this respect. My initial suggestion would be the creation of a new feature, different than 'Helical Sweep' specialized just for Threads and/or Tapping.


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8 REPLIES 8
Dale_Rosema
23-Emerald III
(To:bharito)

Bob,

Until the advent of 3-D printing, there wasn't really a need to model the threads on a part. Unfortunately, there is not a quick way to actual model the threads like you desire. 3-D printing has now been around for over a decade so maybe they will consider this given that fact.

Welcome to the forum,

Dale

Yes, user defined feature should make this easier.

I did a recent update on my threading attempts. You might find this uiseful as it follow the international standard for creating common screw threads (not taperred).

Yet another Thread thread - UTS Implementation

I do not use UDFs but someone could take my efforts to the next level.

Welcome to the forum, Bob!

dschenken
21-Topaz I
(To:bharito)

There is little likelihood that 3D printed threads will be within thread standard tolerances. You will get better results in less time using a die or a tap.

Still, if you find the need and need it often, just create one as a UDF and apply as required.

It all depends on the 3D printer. I have had very good luck in the M10 range for modeling functional threads. And yes, you must leave some clearance. The tool I was using was the particle bath of Nylon that the owner maintained at high temperatures to get the best quality in both strength and edge control. The M10 mating threads would go together without intervention.

Taps and dies may be too course to successfully create standard screw threads from a solid boss or hole without breaking or cracking the body. At least starting a reasonable thread in the 3D printer would help if all you need to do is chase the threads. In that case, by all means, make it nominally flush and remove the thin surface to make them mate correctly.

You have to use your own judgement in most of these cases but a course thread of 1/4" and up should be printable on even the simplest machines.

Patriot_1776
22-Sapphire I
(To:bharito)

I'd say.....definately depends on the resolution of your printer, and the size of the threads. If you're making large threads, say 2"+ major dia, and coarse (like in plastic plumbing fittings), you can probably make pretty decent thtreads IF you model them correctly. For normal size threads, I'd print the holes undersize with no thread, then tap drill and tap them CAREFULLY. Or, better yet, make the holes sized for threaded brass inserts if the threads will actually be used more than once or twice.

Thank you for the comment, which I fully agree to. However the focus of my question is not as much towards achieving a 3-D Printing than modeling the threads with Creo Parametric. There are several fastener manufacturers and suppliers (Penn Engineering; McMaster, etc) we could get the 3-D model of threads from. I still believe that automating somewhat the thread-modeling function in Creo would be very beneficial to the users. A wizard tool designated just for threads could be an enhancement to the software. I can imagine a feature with a table we could fill in the parameters such as Nominal Diameter, Major Diameter, Minimum Diameter, Pitch Diameter, Pitch Value, etc as needed could be helpful. At least, it could save lots of time spent during specifying such dimensions on the part model and also when drawing the thread profile versus having it given in the case of standard threads. Just a thought.

Bob, no one will disagree with you. The only way we can make changes (not being an elite customer) is to post and vote for ideas.

If you have active maintenance, please feel free to vote and comment here: Thread ideas: modeling and drawings

Patriot_1776
22-Sapphire I
(To:bharito)

Guess I'm confused at what you're trying to achieve. Cosmetic threads have parameters where you can fill out most of those details. The holes have that information in a note, though it's a PITA to deal with.

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