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Creo Parametric Tips

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Explanation of Trajectory parameter /  the "trajpar" - on simple examples
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Hello all and welcome to another blog post in the multibody series.   Today’s topic represents an add-on to the previous post : How to “position” a body. The workflow example  in the below video explains in more detail how you can leverage these (previously discussed) positioning operations  to create a design like this very easily.   he intent here is to drive the cutout of the blue body parametrically based on the defined range of angular movement of the yellow pin. The workflow example makes use of the Flexible Modeling Move feature to create something like a “simplified motion envelope” driving the cutout opening in the blue body.      (view in My Videos) Thanks for reading.  I hope it was informative. If you liked it, give it a Kudo.   Back to Creo 7.0 & 8.0+ Multibody Home: Start Here!   Enjoy!....Martin
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Hello all and welcome to another blog post in this multibody blog series. Todays topic: How to “position” a body.   You might wonder why I put the word position into quotes. The reason for this is that when we talk about positioning, many of us start thinking of positioning component-like objects.  The fact that components have their system of reference (e.g. coordinate system including the origin) makes it natural to understand that positioning transforms that coordinate system from one location and orientation into another. Geometric bodies do represent a volume of geometry referring to the part’s reference system, therefore the positioning of geometric bodies should probably be better called “Moving” geometry. Anyway, after this introductory thought, I hope you enjoy the video illustrating how this is done in Creo. (and you won’t be surprised: we are going to use the “Move”-Feature for this workflow 😊 )   (view in My Videos)       Thanks for reading.  I hope it was informative. If you liked it, give it a Kudo.   Back to Creo 7.0 & 8.0+ Multibody Home: Start Here!   Enjoy!....Martin
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Hello all and welcome to another blog post in this multibody blog series. Todays topic: Construction bodies! Construction body are a pretty unique, powerful concept in Creo’s multibody implementation. As such it is really important to know about them and to understand how to use them. So, what are construction bodies? Construction bodies are bodies that are used for the design of your model, but do not contribute to the final geometry or mass. That means that similar on how you used quilts in the past to create additional geometry helping with the construction of your design, you can now do the very same with solid geometry. The construction attribute of these bodies will then help you to differentiate that geometry and automatically exclude it. Excluding them from mass properties is just one out of more than a dozen workflows where they are treated special. You will find more details in the video.   (view in My Videos) Thanks for reading.  I hope it was informative. If you liked it, give it a Kudo.   Back to Creo 7.0 & 8.0+ Multibody Home: Start Here!   Enjoy!....Martin
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Some Creo modules or applications such as NC or mold design modules do not yet fully support multibody models (as of Creo 7.0/8.0).   Watch the below video to understand what you can do in these cases and how you can get to the required reference models for these downstream applications.   Thanks for reading and many thanks to my colleague Beat Fretz who provided this example model (view in My Videos) to me.  I hope it was informative. If you liked it, give it a Kudo.   Back to Creo 7.0 & 8.0+ Multibody Home: Start Here!   Enjoy!....Martin
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Hello everyone and welcome to another blog post in this multibody blog series. This is a mini-post based on a question that I received: “If I have a designed a multibody model, how can I save out a single body to STEP , .STL or any other format?” The answer is pretty straightforward and involves either the remove-body feature (see blog post #10) or construction bodies (see blog post #13) or derived models (see blog post #12 and later).   Method #1: Remove all other bodies using the remove-body feature Export(“Save A Copy”) the model to your desired format Undo the remove / delete the remove-body feature / suppress the remove-body feature Method #2: Set all other bodies to “Construction body” Invoke Export(“Save A Copy”) the model to your desired format Open the “Options”-menu in the “Save A Copy” dialog and ensure the Construction Body checkbox is unchecked Finishing the operation will then only save the remaining (non-construction) body The problem here might be that you need to remember which bodies to unset as construction afterwards if applicable Method #3: Create a derived model that only contains the body to be saved The easiest way to do this would be to select the body and then invoke “Create part from body” from the right mouse button menu. This creates a new part only containing the selected body allowing you to export it on its own Or Create new part and bring the desired body into the new part manually by using  the “External Copy Geometry” feature (view in My Videos) Thanks for reading.  I hope it was informative. If you liked it, give it a Kudo.   Back to Creo 7.0 & 8.0+ Multibody Home: Start Here!   Enjoy!....Martin
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(Remove a body versus hide a body vs delete body vs deleting/suppressing contributing features) Hello everyone and welcome to another blog post  in this Creo multibody blog series. Today’s topic: Various way to “get rid of” a body and their differences Let’s have a look at various concepts that you might want to apply depending on what you want to achieve. Creo offers the following: Hide/Show a body As with other objects you can use show/hide commands to control the visibility of bodies. This is just changing the visual appearance toggling the display for a selected body and does neither remove the body object from the model, nor its geometry or mass “Consume a body” in Boolean features Boolean features have a Keep body option, to control whether the tool bodies should be consumed in the operation or whether a copy of their geometry should be used for the Boolean operation. Consumed bodies are shown in the body folder depending on the tree filter settings.   “Remove body” feature This allows you to create a feature to consume a body. The body cannot be used further, and its geometry is removed. Note that the features are not removed or deleted but the geometry created by those features will not show anymore. Remove body is a feature so you can suppress or delete it or roll-back the model to before the Remove-Body feature to get the body back.   Would suppressing contributing features also work to get rid of a body? This could potentially work in very simple examples for cases where these contributing features have no dependent children features and none of the contributing features contribute to or impact other bodies as well. In contrast to that, the remove-body feature leaves the other design features intact and just removes the body at time of its regeneration. Note that the body is still active and used in regeneration states before the remove-body feature.   Good examples that illustrate the benefits and need for a remove body features (where suppressing features wouldn’t help or not be possible are:   a situation where you bring several bodies A,B and C into a part via a single import feature or copy-geometry, or merge/inheritance feature and you want to only remove body B. a situation where you mirror a part design having bodies A,B and C to get A’, B’ and C’ and you just want to get rid of B’     Delete a body The delete body command completely deletes the body from the model for situations where you want to entirely get rid of the body object, free up its name in the name space and entirely remove it from the internal model entity data base. This is possible for two workflows: Delete new empty body Delete a body that doesn’t have any contributing features anymore   (view in My Videos) Thanks for reading.  I hope it was informative. If you liked it, give it a Kudo.   Back to Creo 7.0 & 8.0 Multibody Home: Start Here!   Enjoy!....Martin  
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How to define custom CSYS for the imported model or how to set custom position:
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Welcome to Creo Coffee with a CAD Expert Series Registration link : https://www.ptc.com/en/technologies/cad/coffee-with-an-expert Main Presenters:  Nicole Casalini (Application Expert) ,Gabriel Valls (Application Expert) and Guille Pezet(Application Expert) when : EVERY THURSDAY 11am CET / 10am BST   Below you will find all the topicd and date for the webcast    Date Topic Aug 19th Basics of Creo Modelling Aug 26th Manufacturing with Creo Sept 2nd Introduction to PLM Sept 9th Mathcad Sept 16th CAD for AR Sept 23rd What’s New in Creo 8 Sept 30th Ansys Partnership (Simulation)
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Check out this video on Tool Design & Mold Analysis  from PTC Application Engineers Presenters: Lee Goodwin (Technical Specialist), Lino Tozzi (Technical Specialist, Fellow) and Tom Quaglia (Creo Segment Sales ) Original Date Presented: September 16th 2021.    (view in My Videos)   Link to all Creo Tips and Technique Recordings 
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Check out this video on Design Exploration/Intelligent Fasteners from PTC Application Engineers Presenters: Lino Tozzi (Technical Specialist, Fellow) and Tom Quaglia (Creo Segment Sales ) Original Date Presented: September 2nd, 2021.    (view in My Videos)   Link to all  Creo Tips and Technique Recordings
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Check out this video on Creo Mechanism Dynamics from PTC Application Engineers Presenters: Lino Tozzi(Technical Specialist, Fellow) and Ryan Butcher (Technical Specialist, Fellow) Original Date Presented: August 3, 2021 To dive deeper into the subject, check out PTC University.   (view in My Videos)
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Welcome to another multibody blog video in which I want to shed some light on body selection and when to reference body surfaces versus bodies as objects. The video covers:   Body Selection Model tree Selection filter Query-Select & Pick from list Select quilt or body Select from parents Autolocate & Selection Priority in Creo 7.0 & Creo 8.0 Design Items tree   Surface Selections RMB: surfaces of all bodies RMB: body surfaces Surface collection – Details dialog Geometry Search   Differences Copy-Geom Pattern FMX Move (view in My Videos)   Thanks for reading. I hope it was informative.   Back to Creo 7.0 & 8.0 Multibody Home: Start Here!   Enjoy!....Martin
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Check out this video on Creo Behavioral Modeling from PTC Application Engineers Presenters: Lino Tozzi(Technical Specialist, Fellow) and Ryan Butcher (Technical Specialist, Fellow)   (view in My Videos)     To dive deeper into the subject, check out PTC University.
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Check out this video on Creo Advanced Assembly from PTC Application Engineers Presenters: Lino Tozzi(Technical Specialist, Fellow) and Ryan Butcher (Technical Specialist, Fellow)   (view in My Videos)     To dive deeper into the subject, check out PTC University.
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One example of Unconventional modeling with Creo
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The best advice for anyone that has trouble in Sketcher is to keep the sketch simple. Do not try and make a single sketch that encompasses the entire model shape  with all cuts and rounded or chamfered edges .  Rather, c reate multiple sketches that are simple, with fewer entities. Fewer entities are easier to control when you start making design changes. Take this muffler model, for example:         The first solid geometry for this model started as this:         Followed by this:       Then this:         Simple sketches of few entities were created, and the solid geometry started to take shape. The sketches should consist of small bites of geometry,  not the whole shape at once.  For more on Sketching and other topics, check out PTC University's Creo: Fundamentals and Productivity Tools!  
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Hello everyone and welcome to blog post #7 in this multibody blog series. This post also attempts to answer another body parameter related question: How can I display, use or call-out a body parameter? If you want to call out a body parameter then you have to use the syntax as explained in the Creo help here.   &<param_name>:BID_<body_feature_ID> Or &<param_name>:BID_<body_userdefined_name>   Note: For bodies that have the default name (body 1, body 2, etc) you cannot use the system-defined default body name but you have to use the body’s Feature ID. (The reason is that the system-defined names such as body 1, body 2, etc are localized and translated into other languages and therefore not representing stable references across languages.)   Example: Let’s assume we have 2 bodies. Here their names and parameters list.     To call out the parameter “MY_BODY_INFO” for both bodies, we can now use the following for body 1 &MY_BODY_INFO:BID_-5778   And one of the following options for the WHEEL body (which has id 6105) &MY_BODY_INFO:BID_6105 &MY_BODY_INFO:BID_WHEEL   So if you create a note and enter: You will see the resulting note text being: I think we have a preference of using body names. Therefore the system automatically tries to convert the body IDs to body names where possible. So when you go back to the call-out symbol definition, you will see it being changed to   Thanks for reading. I hope it was informative.   Back to Creo 7.0 Multibody Home: Start Here!   Enjoy!....Martin
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Hello everyone and welcome to blog post #6 in this multibody blog series.   I got asked recently : How can I display a user-defined body parameter in the model tree? If you are interested in that as well, here is how you do it. Let’s walk through an example step-by-step.   Step 1) Let’s assign a body parameter (and let’s call it for example “MY_BODY_PARAM”)   Step 2) Open the Model Tree Columns display dialog   Step 3) Select the Type: Body Params     Step 4) You might notice that the list shows system parameters related to bodies (e.g. PTC_ASSIGNED_MATERIAL), but not the newly added user-defined parameter  Step 5) Manually enter the user-defined-parameter (in our example “MY_BODY_PARAM”) into the Name field     and click the double-arrow to move it into the displayed columns     Step 6) Click “OK” and ensure model tree columns are displayed. Now you should be able to see your body parameters as part of the displayed model tree columns   q.e.d. 🙂   I hope that helped.   Back to Creo 7.0 Multibody Home: Start Here!   Enjoy!....Martin
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Hello Multibody community!   Welcome to a second post on multibody capabilities added in Creo 7.0.1. What I had not yet been fully covering in the last post was how Creo & Windchill interact as it relates to the multibody concept. So, here a summary of Multibody support for Windchill & Visualization General behavior Multibody parts are managed similarly to single body parts, bodies are not exposed Windchill versions prior to Windchill 12 Body designation information is ignored when connected to a Windchill Server version not supporting body designation yet Publishing of multibody parts to Creo View is supported since Creo View 6.1 (including exposure of bodies to Creo View) Windchill 12 & Creo 7.0.1 Support of Body designation, including Transfer of Body designation information from Creo to Windchill for models containing designated bodies WT part creation for designated bodies if BOM Designation is set (.prt, .asm) IBA mapping & propagation for body materials and mass property parameters Note on Windchill configuration: those attributes have to be added to the Body (under Model Items) type definition. They need to be part of the type definition similar as typically being done for the CAD Document type.   Here is a quick demo of the above capabilities (view in My Videos)   Back to Creo 7.0 Multibody Home: Start Here!   Enjoy!....Martin      
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Hello Multibody community!   Welcome to this new post on the multibody capabilities that we introduced with Creo 7.0. Meanwhile, the first maintenance release Creo 7.0.1 had been released and it does contain several refinements/enhancements to the initial set of capabilities. Here a list of those enhancements: Boolean Operations In Creo 7.0, the “Keep bodies” option in Boolean Merge, Subtract and Intersect features was only available during feature creation. Now it is also enabled during feature Edit-Definition workflows Curve feature  You can now select a body (in addition to the previously available object types Quilt and Surface) when checking the “Place curve on surface” option. Data Exchange The “Import multiple bodies into one part” option is now available in File/Open (Unite) and ATB-enabled Import workflows Improved Body Handling Improved body handling when a feature-owned body (e.g. a body created by split-body, import or data sharing features) gets deleted from the model Data Sharing and Reference Pattern robustness enhancements for specific multibody situations Aligned Material reporting The mass properties report uses the parameter PTC_REPORTED_MATERIAL in all places where material is reported. New configuration option for multi-material parts:   ptc_reported_material_mp_report Windchill support for designated bodies If you are interested in seeing demos of the above capabilities 1)-6), take 15mins to watch me walking through them. Beyond the new capabilities you might also find some of the multibody concept related background information useful. (view in My Videos) Note that I plan a dedicated video showing the Multibody related Windchill interaction for my next post.   Back to Creo 7.0 Multibody Home: Start Here!   Enjoy!....Martin
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