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Timers and schedulers can be useful tool in a Thingworx application.  Their only purpose, of course, is to create events that can be used by the platform to perform and number of tasks.  These can range from, requesting data from an edge device, to doing calculations for alerts, to running archive functions for data.  Sounds like a simple enough process.  Then why do most platform performance issues seem to come from these two simple templates? It all has to do with how the event is subscribed to and how the platform needs to process events and subscriptions.  The tasks of handling MOST events and their related subscription logic is in the EventProcessingSubsystem.  You can see the metrics of this via the Monitoring -> Subsystems menu in Composer.  This will show you how many events have been processed and how many events are waiting in queue to be processed, along with some other settings.  You can often identify issues with Timers and Schedulers here, you will see the number of queued events climb and the number of processed events stagnate. But why!?  Shouldn't this multi-threaded processing take care of all of that.  Most times it can easily do this but when you suddenly flood it with transaction all trying to access the same resources and the same time it can grind to a halt. This typically occurs when you create a timer/scheduler and subscribe to it's event at a template level.  To illustrate this lets look at an example of what might occur.  In this scenario let's imagine we have 1,000 edge devices that we must pull data from.  We only need to get this information every 5 minutes.  When we retrieve it we must lookup some data mapping from a DataTable and store the data in a Stream.  At the 5 minute interval the timer fires it's event.  Suddenly all at once the EventProcessingSubsystem get 1000 events.  This by itself is not a problem, but it will concurrently try to process as many as it can to be efficient.  So we now have multiple transactions all trying to query a single DataTable all at once.  In order to read this table the database (no matter which back end persistence provider) will lock parts or all of the table (depending on the query).  As you can probably guess things begin to slow down because each transaction has the lock while many others are trying to acquire one.  This happens over and over until all 1,000 transactions are complete.  In the mean time we are also doing other commands in the subscription and writing Stream entries to the same database inside the same transactions.  Additionally remember all of these transactions and data they access must be held in memory while they are running.  You also will see a memory spike and depending on resource can run into a problem here as well. Regular events can easily be part of any use case, so how would that work!  The trick to know here comes in two parts.  First, any event a Thing raises can be subscribed to on that same Thing.  When you do this the subscription transaction does not go into the EventProcessingSubsystem.  It will execute on the threads already open in memory for that Thing.  So subscribing to a timer event on the Timer Thing that raised the event will not flood the subsystem. In the previous example, how would you go about polling all of these Things.  Simple, you take the exact logic you would have executed on the template subscription and move it to the timer subscription.  To keep the context of the Thing, use the GetImplimentingThings service for the template to retrieve the list of all 1,000 Things created based on it.  Then loop through these things and execute the logic.  This also means that all of the DataTable queries and logic will be executed sequentially so the database locking issue goes away as well.  Memory issues decrease also because the allocated memory for the quries is either reused or can be clean during garbage collection since the use of the variable that held the result is reallocated on each loop. Overall it is best not to use Timers and Schedulers whenever possible.  Use data triggered events, UI interactions or Rest API calls to initiate transactions whenever possible.  It lowers the overall risk of flooding the system with recourse demands, from processor, to memory, to threads, to database.  Sometimes, though, they are needed.  Follow the basic guides in logic here and things should run smoothly!
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Since it's somewhat unclear on how to set up the reset password feature through the login form, these steps might be a little more helpful. Assuming the mail extension has already been imported into the Thingworx platform and properly configured - say, PassReset - (test with SendMessage service to verify), let's go ahead and create a new user - Blank, and a new organization that will have that user assigned as a member - Test. Let's open the configuration tab for the organization, assign the PassReset mail thing as the mail server, assign login image, style, prompt (optional), check the Allow Password Reset, then the rest looks like this: Onto the Email content part, it is not possible to save the organization as is at the moment: Clicking on the question mark for the Email content will provide the following requirements: Now this is when it might not be too clear. The tokens [[:user:]], [[:organization:]], [[:url:]] can be used in the email body and at the runtime will be replaced with the actual Usernames, organization, and the reset password url. Out of those fiels, only [[:url:]] token is required. So, it is sufficient to place only [[:url:]] in the body and save the organization: Then, when going to the FormLogin, at <your thingworx host:port>/Thingworx/FormLogin/<organization name>, a password reset button is available: Filling out the User information in the reset field, the email gets sent to the user address specified and the proper message appears: Since in this example only the [[:url:]]  token has been used in the email content, the email received will look like this: To troubleshoot any errors that might be seen in the process of retrieving the password reset link, it's helpful to check your browser developer tools and Thingworx application log for details.
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Large files could cause slow response times. In some cases large queries might cause extensively large response files, e.g. calling a ThingWorx service that returns an extensively large result set as JSON file.   Those massive files have to be transferred over the network and require additional bandwidth - for each and every call. The more bandwidth is used, the more time is taken on the network, the more the impact on performance could be. Imagine transferring tens or hundreds of MB for service calls for each and every call - over and over again.   To reduce the bandwidth compression can be activated. Instead of transferring MBs per service call, the server only has to transfer a couple of KB per call (best case scenario). This needs to be configured on Tomcat level. There is some information availabe in the offical Tomcat documation at https://tomcat.apache.org/tomcat-8.5-doc/config/http.html Search for the "compression" attribute.   Gzip compression   Usually Tomcat is compressing content in gzip. To verify if a certain response is in fact compressed or not, the Development Tools or Fiddler can be used. The Response Headers usually mention the compression type if the content is compressed:     Left: no compression Right: compression on Tomcat level   Not so straight forward - network vs. compression time trade-off   There's however a pitfall with compression on Tomcat side. Each response will add additional strain on time and resources (like CPU) to compress on the server and decompress the content on the client. Especially for small files this might be an unnecessary overhead as the time and resources to compress might take longer than just transferring a couple of uncompressed KB.   In the end it's a trade-off between network speed and the speed of compressing, decompressing response files on server and client. With the compressionMinSize attribute a compromise size can be set to find the best balance between compression and bandwith.   This trade-off can be clearly seen (for small content) here:     While the Size of the content shrinks, the Time increases. For larger content files however the Time will slightly increase as well due to the compression overhead, whereas the Size can be potentially dropped by a massive factor - especially for text based files.   Above test has been performed on a local virtual machine which basically neglegts most of the network related traffic problems resulting in performance issues - therefore the overhead in Time are a couple of milliseconds for the compression / decompression.   The default for the compressionMinSize is 2048 byte.   High potential performance improvement   Looking at the Combined.js the content size can be reduced significantly from 4.3 MB to only 886 KB. For my simple Mashup showing a chart with Temperature and Humidity this also decreases total load time from 32 to 2 seconds - also decreasing the content size from 6.1 MB to 1.2 MB!     This decreases load time and size by a factor of 16x and 5x - the total time until finished rendering the page has been decreased by a factor of almost 22x! (for this particular use case)   Configuration   To configure compression, open Tomcat's server.xml   In the <Connector> definitions add the following:   compression="on" compressibleMimeType="text/html,text/xml,text/plain,text/css,text/javascript,application/javascript,application/json"     This will use the default compressionMinSize of 2048 bytes. In addition to the default Mime Types I've also added application/json to compress ThingWorx service call results.   This needs to be configured for all Connectors that users should access - e.g. for HTTP and HTTPS connectors. For testing purposes I have a HTTPS connector with compression while HTTP is running without it.   Conclusion   If possible, enable compression to speed up content download for the client.   However there are some scenarios where compression is actually not a good idea - e.g. when using a WAN Accelerator or other network components that usually bring their own content compression. This not only adds unnecessary overhead but is compressing twice which might lead to errors on client side when decompressing the content.   Especially dealing with large responses can help decreasing impact on performance. As compressing and decompressing adds some overhead, the min size limit can be experimented with to find the optimal compromise between a network and compression time trade-off.
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Remote Monitoring of Assets Benchmark   As @ttielebein introduced previously, one of the missions of the IOT Enterprise Deployment Center (EDC) is to publish benchmarks that showcase the ThingWorx Platform deployed to solve real-world IOT business problems.    Our goal is that these benchmarks can be used as a reference or baseline for architects working on their own implementations... showing not only a successful at-scale implementation, but also what happens when that same implementation is pushed to ...or even past... it's limits.   Please find the first installment attached - a reference benchmark demonstrating ThingWorx deployed to monitor 15,000 assets with a high-volume of data properties per asset.  Over 250 hours of simulations were conducted as part of producing this benchmark.   The IOT EDC team will be monitoring this post (as well as our other posts in the IOT Tech Tips forum) to answer any questions we can about the approaches taken in designing, deploying and simulating this implementation.    As the team will publish more benchmarks like this will be published in the future, we also greatly value any feedback you have that can help us to improve the content for future documents.
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Everywhere in the Thingworx Platform (even the edge and extensions) you see the data structure called InfoTables.  What are they?  They are used to return data from services, map values in mashup and move information around the platform.  What they are is very simple, how they are setup and used is also simple but there are a lot of ways to manipulate them.  Simply put InfoTables are JSON data, that is all.  However they use a standard structure that the platform can recognize and use. There are two peices to an InfoTable, the DataShape definition and the rows array.  The DataShape is the definition of each row value in the rows array.  This is not accessible directly in service code but there are function and structures to manipulate it in services if needed. Example InfoTable Definitions and Values: { dataShape: {     fieldDefinitions : {           name: "ColOneName", baseType: "STRING"     },     {           name: "ColTwoName", baseType: "NUMBER"     }, rows: [     {ColOneName: "FirstValue", ColTwoName: 13},     {ColOneName: "SecondValue, ColTwoName: 14}     ] } So you can see that the dataShape value is made up of a group of JSON objects that are under the fieldDefinitions element.  Each field is a "name" element, which of course defined the field name, and the "baseType" element which is the Thingworx primitive type of the named field.  Typically this structure is automatically created by using a DataShape object that is defined in the platform.  This is also the reason DataShapes need to be defined, so that fields can be defined not only for InfoTables, but also for DataTables and Streams.  This is how Mashups know what the structure of the data is when creating bindings to widgets and other parts of the platform can display data in a structured format. The other part is the "rows" element which contains an array of of JSON objects which contain the actual data in the InfoTable. Accessing the values in the rows is as simple as using standard JavaScript syntax for JSON.  To access the number in the first row of the InfoTable referenced above (if the name of the InfoTable variable is "MyInfoTable") is done using MyInfoTable.rows[0].ColTowName.  This would return a value of 13.  As you can not the JSON array index starts at zero. Looping through an InfoTable in service script is also very simple.  You can use the index in a standard "for loop" structure, but a little cleaner way is to use a "for each loop" like this... for each (row in MyInfoTable.rows) {     var colOneVal = row.ColOneName;     ... } It is important to note that outputs of many base services in the platform have an output of the InfoTable type and that most of these have system defined datashapes built into the platform (such as QueryDataTableEntries, GetImplimentingThings, QueryNumberPropertyHistory and many, many more).  Also all service results from query services accessing external databases are returned in the structure of an InfoTable. Manipulating an InfoTable in script is easy using various functions built into the platform.  Many of these can be found in the "Snippets" tab of the service editor in Composer in both the InfoTableFunctions Resource and InfoTable Code Snippets. Some of my favorites and most commonly used... Create a blank InfoTable: var params = {   infoTableName: "MyTable" }; var MyInfoTable= Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].CreateInfoTable(params); Add a new field to any InfoTable: MyInfoTable.AddField({name: "ColNameThree", baseType: "BOOLEAN"}); Delete a field: MyInfoTable.RemoveField("ColNameThree"); Add a data row: MyInfoTable.AddRow({ColOneName: "NewRowValue", ColTwoName: 15}); Delete one or more data row matching the values defined (Note you can define multiple field in this statement): //delete all rows that have a value of 13 in ColNameOne MyInfoTable.Delete({ColNameOne: 13}); Create an InfoTable using a predefined DataShape: var params = {   infoTableName: "MyInfoTable",   dataShapeName: "dataShapeName" }; var MyInfoTable = Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(params); There are many more functions built into the platform, including ones to filter, sort and query rows.  These can be extremely useful when tying to return limited or more strictly structured InfoTable data.  Hopefully this gives you a better understanding and use of this critical part of the Thingworx Platform.
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This Best Practices document should offer some guidelines and tips & tricks on how to work with Timers and Schedulers in ThingWorx. After exploring the configuration and creation of Timers and Schedulers via the UI or JavaScript Services, this document will also highlight some of the most common performance issues and troubleshooting techniques.   Timers and Schedulers can be used to run jobs or fire events on a regular basis. Both are implemented as Thing Templates in ThingWorx. New Timer and Scheduler Things can be created based on these Templates to introduce time based actions. Timers can be used to fire events in a certain interval, defined in the Timer's Update Rate (default is 60000 milliseconds = 1 minute). Schedulers can be used to run jobs based on a cron pattern (such as once a day or once an hour). Schedulers will also allow for a more detailed time based setup, e.g. based on seconds, hours, days of week or days months etc. Events fired by both Timers and Schedulers can be subscribed to with Subscriptions which can be utilized to execute custom service scripts, e.g. to generate "fake" or random demo data to update Remote Things in a test environment. In general subscriptions and scripts can be used to e.g. run regular maintenance tasks or periodically required functions (e.g. for data aggregation) For more information about setting up Timers and Schedulers it's recommended to also have a look at the following content:   How to set up and configure Timers How to set up and configure Schedulers How to create and configure Timers and Schedulers via JavaScript Services Events and Subscriptions for Timers and Schedulers   Example   The following example will illustrate on how to create a Timer Thing updating a Remote Thing using random values. To avoid any conflicts with permissions and visibility, use the Administrator user to create Things.   Remote Thing   Create a new Thing based on the Remote Thing Template, called myRemoteThing. Add two properties, numberA and numberB - both Integers and marked as persistent. Save myRemoteThing. Timer Thing   Create a new Thing based on the Timer Template, called myTimerThing. In the Configuration, change the Update Rate to 5000, to fire the Event every 5 seconds. User Context to Administrator. This will run the related services with the Administrator's user visibility and permissions. Save myTimerThing. Subscriptions   To update the myRemoteThing properties when the Timer Event fires, there are two options: Configure a Subscription on myRemoteThing and listen to Timer Events on the myTimerThing. Configure a Subscription on myTimerThing and listen to Timer Events on itself as a source. In this example, let's go with the first option and Edit myRemoteThing. Create a new Subscription pointing to myTimerThing as a Source. Select the Timer Event Note that if no source is selected, the Timer Event is not availabe, as myRemoteThing is based on the Remote Thing Template and not the Timer Template Enable the Subscription. In the Script area use the following code to assign two random numbers to the Thing's custom properties: me.numberA = Math.floor(Math.random() * 100); me.numberB = Math.floor(Math.random() * 100); Save myRemoteThing. Validation   The Subscription will be enabled and active on saving it. Switch to the myRemoteThing Properties Refreshing the Values will show updates with random numbers between 0 and 99 every 5 seconds (Timer Update Rate).   Performance considerations   Timers and Schedulers are handled via the Event Processing Subsystem. Metrics that impact current performance can be seen in Monitoring > Subsystems > Event Processing Implementing Timers and Schedulers on a Thing Template level might flood the system with services executions originating from Subscriptions to Timer / Scheduler triggered Events. Subscribing to another Thing's Events will be handled via the Event Processing Subsystem. Subscribing to an Event on the same Thing will not be handled via the Event Processing Subsystem, but rather execute on the already open in memory Thing. If Timers and Schedulers are not necessarily needed, the Services can be triggered e.g. via Data Change Events, UI Interactions etc. Recursion can be a hidden performance contributer where a Subscription to a certain Event executes a service, triggering another Event with recursive dependencies. Ensure there are no circular dependencies and service calls across Entities. If possible, reads for each and every action from disk should be avoided. Performance can be increased by storing relevant information in memory and using Streams or Datatables or for persistence. If possible, call other Services from within the Subscription instead of handling all code within the Subscription itself. For full details, see also Timers and Schedulers - Best Practice   How to identify and troubleshoot technical issues   Check the Event Processing Subsystem for any spikes in queued Events (tasks submitted) while the total number of tasks completed is not or only slowly increasing. For a historical overview, search the ApplicationLog for "Thingworx System Metrics" to get system metrics since the server has been (re-) started. In the ApplicationLog the message "Subsystem EventProcessingSubsystem is started" indicates that the Subsystem is indeed started and available. Use custom loggers in Services to get more context around errors and execution in the ScriptLog Custom Loggers can be used to identify if Events have fired and Subscriptions are actually triggered Example: logger.debug("myThing: executing subscribed service") For issues with Service execution, see also CS268218 Infinite loops in Services could render the server unresponsive and might flood the system with various Events To change the timing for a Timer, restarting the Thing is not enough. The Timer must be disabled and enabled at the desired start time. Schedulers will allow for a much more flexible timing and setting / changing execution times in advance. For further analysis it's recommended to generate Thread Dumps to get more information about the current state of Threads in the JVM. The ThingWorx Support Tools Extension can help in generating those. See also CS245547 for more information and usage.
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This document is designed to help troubleshoot some commonly seen issues while installing or upgrading the ThingWorx application, prior or instead of contacting Tech Support. This is not a defined template for a guaranteed solution, but rather a reference guide that provides an opportunity to eliminate some of the possible root causes. While following the installation guide and matching the system requirements is sufficient to get a successfully running instance of ThingWorx, some issues could still occur upon launching the app for the first time. Generally, those issues arise from minor environmental details and can be easily fixed by aligning with the proper installation process. Currently, the majority of the installation hiccups are coming from the postgresql side. That being said, the very first thing to note, whether it's a new user trying out the platform or a returning one switching the database to postgresql, note that: Postgresql database must be installed, configured, and running prior to the further Thingworx installation. ThingWorx 7.0+: Installation errors out with 'failed to succeed more than the maximum number of allowed acquisition attempts' Platform being shut down because System Ownership cannot be acquired error ERROR: relation "system_version" does not exist Resolution: Generally, this type of error point at the security/permission issue. As all of the installation operations should be performed by a root/Administrator role, the following points should be verified: Ensure both Tomcat and ThingworxPlatform folders have relevant read/write permissions The title and contents of the configuration file in the ThingworxPlatform folder has changed from 6.x to 7.x Check if the right configuration file is in the folder Verify if the name and password provided in this configuration file matches the ones set in the Postgres DB Run the Database cleanup script, and then set up the database again. Verufy by checking the thingworx table space (about 53 tables should be created)     Thingworx Application: Blank screen, no errors in the logs, "waiting for <url> " gears running be never actually loading, eventually times out     Resolution: Ensure that Java in tomcat is pointing to the right path, should be something like this: C:\Program Files\Java\jre1.8.0_101\bin\server\jvm.dll 6.5+ Postgres:   Error when executing thingworxpostgresDBSetup.bat psql:./thingworx-database-setup.sql:1: ERROR: could not set permissions on directory "D:/ThingworxPostgresqlStorage": Permission denied     Resolution:     The error means that the postgres user was not able to create a directory in the ‘ThingworxPostgresStorage’ directory. As it's related to the security/permission, the following steps can be taken to clear out the error: Assigning read/write permissions to everyone user group to fix the script execution and then execute the batch file: Right-click on ‘ThingworxPostgresStorage’ directory -> Share with -> specific people. Select drop-down, add everyone group and update the permission level to Read/Write. Click Share. Executing the batch file as admin. 2. Installation error message "relation root_entity_collection does not exist" is displayed with Postgresql version of the ThingWorx platform. Resolution:     Such an error message is displayed only if the schema parameter passed to thingworxPostgresSchemaSetup.sh script  is different than $USER or PUBLIC. To clear out the error: Edit the Postgresql configuration file, postgresql.conf, to add to the SEARCH_PATH item your own schema . Other common errors upon launching the application. Two of the most commonly seen errors are 404 and 401.  While there can be a numerous reasons to see those errors, here are the root causes that fall under the "very likely" category: 404 Application not found during a new install: Ensure Thingworx.war was deployed -- check the hard drive directory of Tomcat/webapps and ensure Thingworx.war and Thingworx folder are present as well as the ThingworxStorage in the root (or custom selected location) Ensure the Thingworx.war is not corrupted (may re-download from the support and compare the size) 401 Application cannot be accessed during a new install or upgrade: For Postgresql, ensure the database is running and is connected to, also see the Basic Troubleshooting points below. Verify the tomcat, java, and database (in case of postgresql) versions are matching the system requirement guide for the appropriate platform version Ensure the updrade was performed according to the guide and the necessary folders were removed (after copying as a preventative measure). Ensure the correct port is specified in platform-settings.json (for Postgresql), by default the connection string is jdbc:postgresql://localhost: 5432 /thingworx Again, it should be kept in mind that while the symptoms are common and can generally be resolved with the same solution, every system environment is unique and may require an individual approach in a guaranteed resolution. Basic troubleshooting points for: Validating PostgreSQL installation Postgres install troubleshooting java.lang.NullPointerException error during PostgreSQL installation ***CRITICAL ERROR: permission denied for relation root_entity_collection Error while running scripts: Could not set permissions on directory "/ThingworxPostgresqlStorage":Permission Denied Acquisition Attempt Failed error Resolution : Ensure 'ThingworxStorage', 'ThingworxPlatform' and 'ThingworxPostgresqlStorage' folders are created The folders have to be present in the root directory unless specifically changed in any configurations Recommended to grant sufficient privileges (if not all) to the database user (twadmin) Note: While running the script in order to create a database, if a schema name other than 'public' is used, the "search_path" in "postgresql.conf" must be changed to reflect 'NewSchemaName, public' Grant permission to user for access to root folders containing 'ThingworxPostgresqlStorage' and 'ThingworxPlatform' The password set for the default 'twadmin' in the pgAdmin III tool must match the password set in the configuration file under the ThingworxPlatform folder Ensure THINGWORX_PLATFORM_SETTINGS variable is set up Error: psql:./thingworx-database-setup.sql:14: ERROR:  could not create directory "pg_tblspc/16419/PG_9.4_201409291/16420": No such file or directory psql:./thingworx-database-setup.sql:16: ERROR:  database "thingworx" does not exist Resolution: R eplacing /ThingworxPostgresqlStorage in the .bat file by C:\ThingworxPostgresqlStorage and omitting the -l option in the command window. Also, note the following error Troubleshooting Syntax Error when running postgresql set up scripts
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Installing an Open Source Time Series Platform For testing InfluxDB and its graphical user interface, Chronograf I'm using Docker images for easy deployment. For this post I assume you have worked with Docker before.   In this setup, InfluxDB and Chronograf will share an internal docker network to exchange data.   InfluxDB can be accessed e.g. by ThingWorx via its exposed port 8086. Chronograf can be accessed to administrative purposes via its port 8888. The following commands can be used to create a InfluxDB environment.   Pull images   sudo docker pull influxdb:latest sudo docker pull chronograf:latest   Create a virtual network   sudo docker network create influxdb   Start the containers   sudo docker run -d --name=influxdb -p 8086:8086 --net=influxdb --restart=always influxdb sudo docker run -d --name=chronograf -p 8888:8888 --net=influxdb --restart=always chronograf --influxdb-url=http://influxdb:8086     InfluxDB should now be reachable and will also restart automatically when Docker (or the Operating System) are restarted.
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Overview The Axeda Platform is a secure and scalable foundation to build and deploy enterprise-grade applications for connected products, both wired and wireless. This article provides you with a detailed feature overview and helpful links to more in-depth articles and tutorials for a deeper dive into key areas. Types of Connected Product Applications M2M applications can span many vertical markets and industries. Virtually every aspect of business and personal life is being transformed by ubiquitous connectivity. Some examples of M2M applications include: Vehicle Telematics and Fleet Management - Monitor and track the location, movements, status, and behavior of a vehicle or fleet of vehicles Home Energy Monitoring - Smart energy sensors and plugs providing homeowners with remote control and cost-saving suggestions Smart Television and Entertainment Delivery - Integrated set-top box providing in-view interaction with other devices – review your voicemails while watching a movie, chat with your Facebook friends, etc. Family Location Awareness - Set geofences on teenagers, apply curfews, locate family members in real time, with vehicle speed and condition Supply Chain Optimization - Combine status at key inspection points with logistics and present distribution managers with an interactive, real-time control panel Telemedicine - Self-monitoring/testing, telecardiology, teleradiology Why Use a Platform? Have you ever built a Web application? If so, you probably didn't create the Web server as part of your project. Web servers or Web application servers like Apache HTTPd or JBoss manage TCP sockets, threads, the HTTP protocol, the compilation of scripts, and include thousands of other base services. By leveraging the work done by the dedicated individuals who produced those core services, you were able to rapidly build an application that provided value to your users.  The Axeda Platform is analogous to a Web server or a Web application server, but provides services and a design paradigm that makes connected product development streamlined and efficient. Anatomy of an Axeda Connected Product Connected Products can really be anything that your product and imagination can offer, but it is helpful to take pause for some common considerations that apply to most, if not all of these types of solutions. Getting Connected - Bring your product or equipment to the network so that it can provide information to the solution, and react to commands and configuration changes orchestrated by the application logic. Manage and Orchestrate - Script your business logic in the cloud to tie together remote information with information from other business systems or cloud-based services, react to real-time conditions, and facilitate batch operations to synchronize, analyze, and integrate. Present and Report - Build your user experiences, enabling people to interact with your connected product, manage workflows around business processes, or facilitate data analysis. Let's take a look at the Axeda Platform services that help with each of these solution considerations. Getting Connected Wired & Wireless Getting connected can assume all sorts of shapes, depending on the environment of your product and the economics of your solution. The Axeda Platform makes no assumption about connectivity, but instead provides features and functionality to help you connect.For wireless applications, especially those which may use cellular or satellite communications, the speed and cost of communication will be an important factor.  For this reason, Axeda has created the Adaptive Machine Messaging Protocol (AMMP), a cross-platform, efficient HTTP-based protocol that you can use to communicate bi-directionally with the platform.  The protocol is expressive, robust, secure, and most importantly, able to be implemented on a wide range of hardware and programming environments. When you are faced with connecting legacy products that may be communicating with a proprietary messaging protocol, the Axeda Platform can be extended with Codecs to "learn" your protocol by translating your device's communication format into a form that the platform can understand. This is a great option for retrofitting existing, deployed products to get connectivity and value today, while designing your next-generation of product with AMMP support built-in. Manage and Orchestrate The Data Model defines the information and its behavior in the Axeda Platform. Rules Rules form the heart of a dynamic connected application. There are three types of rules that can be leveraged for your orchestration layer: Expression rules run in the cloud, and are configured and associated with your assets through the Axeda Admin UI or SDK. These rules have an If-Then-Else structure that's easy to create and understand. They're like a formula in a spreadsheet. For example, say your asset has a dataitem reading for temperature: [TODO: Image of dataitem TEMP] This rule compares the temperature to 80 every time a reading is received. When this happens, the rule creates an alarm with name "High Temp" and severity 100.Learn more about Expression Rules. State Machines help organize Expression Rules into manageable groups that apply to assets when the assets are in a certain state. For example, if your asset were a refrigerated truck, and you were interested in receiveing an alert when the temperature within the cargo area rose above a preset threshold, you would not want this rule to be applied when your truck asset is empty and parked in the distribution center lot. In this case, you might organize your rules into a state machine called “TruckStatus”. The TruckStatus state machine would then consist of a set of states that you define, and the rules that execute when the truck is in a particular state. [TODO - show state machine image?] State “Parked”: IF doorOpen THEN … State “In Transit”: IF temperature > 40 THEN… State “Maintenance”: <no rules> You can learn more about state machines in an upcoming technical article soon. Scripting Using Axeda Custom Objects, you can harness the power of the Axeda SDK to gain access to the complete set of platform data and functionality, all within a script that you customize. Custom Object scripts can be invoked in an Expression Rule to provide customized and flexible business logic for your application. Custom Object scripts are written in a powerful scripting language called Groovy, which is 100% Java syntax compatible. Groovy also offers very modern, concise syntax options that make your code simple and easy to understand. Groovy can also implement the body of a web service method. We call this Scripto. Scripto allows you to write code and call that code by name through a REST web service. This allows a client application to call a set of customized web services that return exactly the information and format needed by the application. Here is a beginning tutorial on Scripto.  This site includes many Scripto examples called by different Rich Internet Applications (RIA). Location-Based Services Knowing where something is, and where it has been, opens a world of possible application features. The Axeda Platform can keep track of an asset’s current and historical location, which allows your applications to plot the current position of your assets on a map, or show a breadcrumb trail of where a particular asset has been. Geofences are virtual perimeters around geographic locations. You can define a geofence around a physical location by describing a center point and radius, or by “drawing” a polygon around an arbitrary shape. For instance, you may have a geofence around the Boston metro that is defined as the center of town with a 10-mile radius. You may then compare an asset’s location to this geofence in a rule and trigger events to occur. IF InNamedGeofence(“Boston”) THEN CreateAlarm(…) You can learn more about geofences and other location-oriented rule features in an upcoming tutorial. Integration Queue In today’s software landscape, almost no complete solution is an island unto itself. Business systems need to interoperate by sharing data and events, so that specialized systems can do their job without tight coupling. Messaging is a robust and capable pattern for bridging the gap between systems, especially those that are hosted in the cloud. The Axeda Platform provides a message queue that can be subscribed to by external systems to trigger processes and workflows in those systems, based on events that are being tracked within the platform. A simple ExpressionRule can react to a condition by placing a message in the integration queue as follows: IF Alarm.severity > 100 THEN PublishObject() A message is then placed in the queue describing the platform event, and another business system may subscribe to these messages and react accordingly. Web Services Web Services are at the heart of a cloud-based API stack, and the Axeda Platform provides full comprehensiveness or flexibility. The platform exposes Web Service operations for all platform data and configuration meta data. As a result, you can determine the status of an asset, query historical data for assets, search for assets based on their current location, or even configure expression rules and other configuration settings all through a modern Web Service API, using standard SOAP and REST communication protocols. Scripto Web Service APIs simplify system integration in a loosely-coupled, secure way, and we have a commitment to offering a comprehensive collection of standard APIs into the Axeda Platform. But we can't have an API that suits every need exactly. You may want data in a particular format, such as CSV, JSON, or XML. Or some logic should be applied and its inefficient to query lots of data to look for the bit you want. Wouldn’t you rather make the service on the other side do exactly what you want, and give it to you in exactly the format you need? That is Scripto – the bridge between the power and efficiency of the Axeda Custom Object scripting engine, and a Web Service client. Using Scripto, you can code a script in the Groovy language, using the Axeda SDK and potentially mashing up results from other systems, all within the platform, and expose your script to an external consumer via a single, REST-based Web Service operation. You create your own set of Web Services that do exactly what you want. This powerful combination let’s you simplify your Web Service client code, and give you easy access and maintainability to the scripted logic. Present Rich Internet Applications are a great way to build engaging, information-rich user experiences. By exposing platform data and functions via Web Services and Scripto, you can use your tool of choice for developing your front-end. In fact, if you choose a technology that doesn’t require a server-side rendering engine, such as HTML + AJAX, Adobe Flash, or Microsoft Silverlight, then you can upload your application UI files to the Axeda Platform and let the platform serve your URL! Addition references for using RIAs on the Axeda Platform: Axeda Sample Application: Populating A Web Page with Data Items Extending the Axeda Platform UI - Custom Tabs and Modules Far-Front-Ends and Other Systems If a client-only user RIA interface is not an option for you, you can still use Web Services to integrate platform information into other server-side presentation technologies, such as Microsoft Sharepoint portal or a Java EE Web Application. You can also get lightning-fast updates for your users with the Axeda Machine Streams that uses ActiveMQ JMS technology to stream data in real-time from the Axeda Platform to your custom data warehouses.  While your users are viewing a drill down on a set of assets, they can receive asynchronous notifications about real-time data changes, without the need to constantly poll Web Services. Summary Building Connected Products and applications for them is incredibly rewarding job. Axeda provides a set of core services and a framework for bringing your application to market.
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Developing Great IoT Solutions Brought to you once again by your EDC team, find attached here a brand-new, comprehensive overview of ThingWorx best practices! This guide was crafted by combining all available feedback, from support cases to PTC Community threads, and tapping all internal resources. Let this guide serve to bridge the knowledge gaps ThingWorx developers most commonly see.    The Developing Great IoT Solutions (DGIS) Guide is a great way to inform both business and technically minded folks about the capabilities of the ThingWorx Platform. Learn how to design good solutions from a high-level, an overview designed specifically with the business audience in mind. Or, learn how to implement good IoT designs through a series of technical examples. Start from very little knowledge of the Platform and end up understanding data structures and aggregation, how to use the collection widget, and how to build a fully functional rules engine for sending and acknowledging alerts in ThingWorx.   For the more advanced among us, check out the Appendix. Find here a handy list of do's and don'ts surrounding ThingWorx best practice in development, with links to KCS, Help Center, and Community content.   Reinforce your understanding of the capabilities of the ThingWorx Platform with this guide, today!   A big thanks to all who were involved on this project! Happy developing!
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1. Add an Json parameter Example: { ​    "rows":[         {             "email":" example1@ptc.com "         },         {             "name":"Qaqa",             "email":" example2@ptc.com "         }     ] } 2. Create an Infotable with a DataShape using CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(params) 3. Using a for loop, iterate through each Json object and add it to the Infotable using InfoTableName.AddRow(YourRowObjectHere) Example: var params = {     infoTableName: "InfoTable",     dataShapeName : "jsontest" }; var infotabletest = Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(params); for(var i=0; i<json.rows.length; i++) {     infotabletest.AddRow({name:json.rows.name,email:json.rows.email}); }
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Create a new Thing using the Scheduler Thing Template. The Scheduler Thing will fire a ScheduledEvent Event when the configured schedule is fired. The event is automatically present and does not need to be added manually. Configuration   The Scheduler Configuration is quite straightforward and allows for an exact setup of schedule based on units of time, e.g. seconds, minutes, hours, days of week etc. It can be accessed via the Thing's Entity Configuration   Configuration allows for Changing the runAsUser context - in which the Events will be handled. The user will need visibility and permission on e.g. executing Services or depending Things, which are required to run the Service triggered by the Event. Changing the Schedule - in which time the Events will be fired (by default every minute). The schedule is displayed in CRON String notation and can be changed and viewed in detail by clicking on "More". The CRON String will be generated automatically based on the inputs. Schedules can be configured in Manual mode - allowing for full configuration of each and every time based attribute. Schedules can be configured for a specific time Type - allowing for configuration only based on seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, months or years. Below screenshots show schedules running every minute and every Saturday / Sunday at 12:00 ("Every Weekend Day").     Services   Scheduler Things inherit two Services by default from the Thing Template DisableScheduler EnableScheduler These will activate / de-activate the Scheduler and allow / disallow firing Events once a scheduled time is reached If a Scheduler is currenty enabled or disabled can be seen in its properites  
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Predictive models: ​ Predictive model is one of the best technique to perform predictive analytics. This is the development of models that are trained on historical data and make predictions on new data. These models are built in order to analyse the current data records in combination with some historical data.   Use of Predictive Analytics in Thingworx Analytics and How to Access Predictive Analysis Functionality via Thingworx Analytics   Bias and variance are the two components of imprecision in predictive models. Bias in predictive models is a measure of model rigidity and inflexibility, and means that your model is not capturing all the signal it could from the data. Bias is also known as under-fitting.  Variance on the other hand is a measure of model inconsistency, high variance models tend to perform very well on some data points and really bad on others. This is also known as over-fitting and means that your model is too flexible for the amount of training data you have and ends up picking up noise in addition to the signal.   If your model is performing really well on the training set, but much poorer on the hold-out set, then it’s suffering from high variance. On the other hand if your model is performing poorly on both training and test data sets, it is suffering from high bias.   Techniques to improve:   Add more data: Having more data is always a good idea. It allows the “data to tell for itself,” instead of relying on assumptions and weak correlations. Presence of more data results in better and accurate models. The question is when we should ask for more data? We cannot quantify more data. It depends on the problem you are working on and the algorithm you are implementing, example when we work with time series data, we should look for at least one-year data, And whenever you are dealing with neural network algorithms, you are advised to get more data for training otherwise model won’t generalize.  Feature Engineering: Adding new feature decreases bias on the expense of variance of the model. New features can help algorithms to explain variance of the model in more effective way. When we do hypothesis generation, there should be enough time spent on features required for the model. Then we should create those features from existing data sets. Feature Selection: This is one of the most important aspects of predictive modelling. It is always advisable to choose important features in the model and build the model again only with important and significant features. e. let’s say we have 100 variables. There will be variables which drive most of the variance of a model. If we just select the number of features only on p-value basis, then we may still have more than 50 variables. In that case, you should look for other measures like contribution of individual variable to the model. If 90% variance of the model is explained by only 15 variables then only choose those 15 variables in the final model. Multiple Algorithms: Hitting at the right machine learning algorithm is the ideal approach to achieve higher accuracy. Some algorithms are better suited to a particular type of data sets than others. Hence, we should apply all relevant models and check the performance. Algorithm Tuning: We know that machine learning algorithms are driven by parameters. These parameters majorly influence the outcome of learning process. The objective of parameter tuning is to find the optimum value for each parameter to improve the accuracy of the model. To tune these parameters, you must have a good understanding of these meaning and their individual impact on model. You can repeat this process with a number of well performing models. For example: In random forest, we have various parameters like max_features, number_trees, random_state, oob_score and others. Intuitive optimization of these parameter values will result in better and more accurate models. Cross Validation: Cross Validation is one of the most important concepts in data modeling. It says, try to leave a sample on which you do not train the model and test the model on this sample before finalizing the model. This method helps us to achieve more generalized relationships. Ensemble Methods: This is the most common approach found majorly in winning solutions of Data science competitions. This technique simply combines the result of multiple weak models and produce better results. This can be achieved through many ways.  Bagging: It uses several versions of the same model trained on slightly different samples of the training data to reduce variance without any noticeable effect on bias. Bagging could be computationally intensive esp. in terms of memory. Boosting: is a slightly more complicated concept and relies on training several models successively each trying to learn from the errors of the models preceding it. Boosting decreases bias and hardly affects variance.     
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Welcome to the ThingWorx Manufacturing Apps Community! The ThingWorx Manufacturing Apps are easy to deploy, pre-configured role-based starter apps that are built on PTC’s industry-leading IoT platform, ThingWorx. These Apps provide manufacturers with real-time visibility into operational information, improved decision making, accelerated time to value, and unmatched flexibility to drive factory performance.   This Community page is open to all users-- including licensed ThingWorx users, Express (“freemium”) users, or anyone interested in trying the Apps. Tech Support community advocates serve users on this site, and are here to answer your questions about downloading, installing, and configuring the ThingWorx Manufacturing Apps.     A. Sign up: ThingWorx Manufacturing Apps Community: PTC account credentials are needed to participate in the ThingWorx Community. If you have not yet registered a PTC eSupport account, start with the Basic Account Creation page.   Manufacturing Apps Web portal: Register a login for the ThingWorx Manufacturing Apps web portal, where you can download the free trial and navigate to the additional resources discussed below.     B. Download: Choose a download/packaging option to get started.   i. Express/Freemium Installer (best for users who are new to ThingWorx): If you want to quickly install ThingWorx Manufacturing Apps (including ThingWorx) use the following installer: Download the Express/Freemium Installer   ii. 30-day Developer Kit trial: To experience the capabilities of the ThingWorx Platform with the Manufacturing Apps and create your own Apps: Download the 30-day Developer Kit trial   iii. Import as a ThingWorx Extension (for users with a Manufacturing Apps entitlement-- including ThingWorx commercial customers, PTC employees, and PTC Partners): ThingWorx Manufacturing apps can be imported as ThingWorx extensions into an existing ThingWorx Platform install (v8.1.0). To locate the download, open the PTC Software Download Page and expand the following folders:   ThingWorx Platform | Release 8.x | ThingWorx Manufacturing Apps Extension | Most Recent Datacode     C. Learn After downloading the installer or extensions, begin with Installation and Configuration.   Follow the steps laid out in the ThingWorx Manufacturing Apps Setup and Configuration Guide 8.2   Find helpful getting-started guides and videos available within the 'Get Started' section of the ThingWorx Manufacturing Apps Portal.     D. Customize Once you have successfully downloaded, installed, and configured the Manufacturing Apps, begin to explore the deeper potential of the Apps and the ThingWorx Platform.   Follow along with the discussion and steps contained in the ThingWorx Manufacturing Apps and Service Apps Customization Guide  8.2   Also contained within the the 'Get Started' page of the ThingWorx Manufacturing Apps Portal, find the "Evolve and Expand" section, featuring: -Custom Plant Layout application -Custom Asset Advisor application -Global Plant View application -Thingworx Manufacturing Apps Technical Lab with Sigma Tile (Raspberry Pi application) -Configuring the Apps with demo data set and simulator -Additional Advanced Documentation     E. Get help / give feedback / interact Use the ThingWorx Manufacturing Apps Community page as a resource to find documentation, peruse past forum threads, or post a question to start a discussion! For advanced troubleshooting, licensed users are encouraged to submit support tickets to the PTC My eSupport portal.
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This document attached to this blog entry actually came out of my first exposure to using the C SDK on a Raspberry PI. I took notes on what I had to do to get my own simple edge application working and I think it is a good introduction to using the C SDK to report real, sampled data. It also demonstrates how you can use the C SDK without having to use HTTPS. It demonstrates how to turn off HTTPS support. I would appreciate any feedback on this document and what additions might be useful to anyone else who tries to do this on their own.
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​​​There are four types of Analytics:                                                                 Prescriptive analytics: What should I do about it? Prescriptive analytics is about using data and analytics to improve decisions and therefore the effectiveness of actions.Prescriptive analytics is related to both Descriptive and Predictive analytics. While Descriptive analytics aims to provide insight into what has happened and Predictive analytics helps model and forecast what might happen, Prescriptive analytics seeks to determine the best solution or outcome among various choices, given the known parameters. “Any combination of analytics, math, experiments, simulation, and/or artificial intelligence used to improve the effectiveness of decisions made by humans or by decision logic embedded in applications.”These analytics go beyond descriptive and predictive analytics by recommending one or more possible courses of action. Essentially they predict multiple futures and allow companies to assess a number of possible outcomes based upon their actions. Prescriptive analytics use a combination of techniques and tools such as business rules, algorithms, machine learning and computational modelling procedures. Prescriptive analytics can also suggest decision options for how to take advantage of a future opportunity or mitigate a future risk, and illustrate the implications of each decision option. In practice, prescriptive analytics can continually and automatically process new data to improve the accuracy of predictions and provide better decision options. Prescriptive analytics can be used in two ways: Inform decision logic with analytics: Decision logic needs data as an input to make the decision. The veracity and timeliness of data will insure that the decision logic will operate as expected. It doesn’t matter if the decision logic is that of a person or embedded in an application — in both cases, prescriptive analytics provides the input to the process. Prescriptive analytics can be as simple as aggregate analytics about how much a customer spent on products last month or as sophisticated as a predictive model that predicts the next best offer to a customer. The decision logic may even include an optimization model to determine how much, if any, discount to offer to the customer. Evolve decision logic: Decision logic must evolve to improve or maintain its effectiveness. In some cases, decision logic itself may be flawed or degrade over time. Measuring and analyzing the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of enterprises decisions allows developers to refine or redo decision logic to make it even better. It can be as simple as marketing managers reviewing email conversion rates and adjusting the decision logic to target an additional audience. Alternatively, it can be as sophisticated as embedding a machine learning model in the decision logic for an email marketing campaign to automatically adjust what content is sent to target audiences. Different technologies of Prescriptive analytics to create action: Search and knowledge discovery: Information leads to insights, and insights lead to knowledge. That knowledge enables employees to become smarter about the decisions they make for the benefit of the enterprise. But developers can embed search technology in decision logic to find knowledge used to make decisions in large pools of unstructured big data. Simulation: ​Simulation imitates a real-world process or system over time using a computer model. Because digital simulation relies on a model of the real world, the usefulness and accuracy of simulation to improve decisions depends a lot on the fidelity of the model. Simulation has long been used in multiple industries to test new ideas or how modifications will affect an existing process or system. Mathematical optimization: Mathematical optimization is the process of finding the optimal solution to a problem that has numerically expressed constraints. Machine learning: “Learning” means that the algorithms analyze sets of data to look for patterns and/or correlations that result in insights. Those insights can become deeper and more accurate as the algorithms analyze new data sets. The models created and continuously updated by machine learning can be used as input to decision logic or to improve the decision logic automatically. Paragmetic AI: ​Enterprises can use AI to program machines to continuously learn from new information, build knowledge, and then use that knowledge to make decisions and interact with people and/or other machines.                                               Use of Prescriptive Analytics in ThingWorx Analytics: Thing Optimizer: Thing Optimizer functionality provides the prescriptive scoring and optimization capabilities of ThingWorx Analytics. While predictive scoring allows you to make predictions about future outcomes, prescriptive scoring allows you to see how certain changes might affect future outcomes. After you have generated a prediction model (also called training a model), you can modify the prescriptive attributes in your data (those attributes marked as levers) to alter the predictions. The prescriptive scoring process evaluates each lever attribute, and returns an optimal value for that feature, depending on whether you want to minimize or maximize the goal variable. Prescriptive scoring results include both an original score (the score before any lever attributes are changed) and an optimized score (the score after optimal values are applied to the lever attributes). In addition, for each attribute identified in your data as a lever, original and optimal values are included in the prescriptive scoring results. How to Access Thing Optimizer Functionality: ThingWorx Analytics prescriptive scoring can only be accessed via the REST API Service. Using a REST client, you can access the Scoring service which includes a series of API endpoints to submit scoring requests, retrieve results, list jobs, and more. Requires installation of the ThingWorx Analytics Server. How to avoid mistakes - Below are some common mistakes while doing Prescriptive analytics: Starting digital analytics without a clear goal Ignoring core metrics Choosing overkill analytics tools Creating beautiful reports with little business value Failing to detect tracking errors                                                                                                                                 Image source: Wikipedia, Content: go.forrester.com(Partially)
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In this post, I will use an instance of InfluxDB and Chronograf. See this post for installing both using Docker. InfluxDB - Time Series Databases   InfluxDB is a time series database. It allows users to work with and organize time series data. The advantage of such a database system is that it comes with built-in functionality to easily aggregate and operate on data based on time intervals. Other types of databases can do this as well - but time series databases are heavily optimized for this kind of data structures which will show in storage space and performance.   Data is stored in the database with its timestamp, its value and one or more tags.   Time Temperature Humidity Location 2019-01-24T00:00:00 23 42 Home 2019-01-24T00:01:00 22 43 Home 2019-01-24T00:02:00 21 44 Home 2019-01-24T00:03:00 23 45 Home 2019-01-24T00:04:00 24 42 Home 2019-01-24T00:05:00 25 43 Home 2019-01-24T00:06:00 23 44 Home   Values can be aggregated by intervalls, i.e. "give me the temperatur values within the last hour and take the average for 5 minutes". This would result in (60 / 5) = 12 results with a value that represents the average temperature within this 5 minute interval.   Example: Temperature Data averaged by 4 minutes   Time Temperature 2019-01-24T00:00:00 (23 + 22 + 21+ 23) / 4 = 22,25 2019-01-24T00:04:00 (24 + 25 + 23) / 3 = 24   To find out more about InfluxDB see also https://www.influxdata.com/time-series-database/ and https://www.influxdata.com/time-series-platform/   InfluxDB in ThingWorx   The new ThingWorx 8.4 release comes with an option to setup InfluxDB as additional Persistence Provider. Meta Data like Entity Definitons will still be stored in PostgreSQL. Streams, Value Streams and Data Tables however can be stored in InfluxDB.   The InfluxDB Persistence Provider setup is delivered with the PostgreSQL installation package for ThingWorx. Currently ThingWorx does not allow any aggregation of data with its built-in InfluxDB capabilities.   Prepare InfluxDB   InfluxDB will need a user and a database. Connect via Chronograf - the graphical UI to administer InfluxDB and create a new user via   InfluxDB Admin > Users Default username = twadmin Default password = password Permissions = ALL   Create a new database via   InfluxDB Admin > Databases Default database name = thingworx   Configure ThingWorx   Create a new Persistence Provider for InfluxDB in ThingWorx - but don't mark it as active yet!     Switch to the Configuration and change the username / password, database and hostname to match your installation.     Save the configuration, switch back to the General tab and mark the InfluxDB Persistence Provider as Active.   Save again and a "successful" message will be shown. If the save action failed, the connection settings are not correct - check for the correct ports and for any typos.   Creating Entities & Testing   Streams, Value Streams and Data Tables can now be created using the new InfluxDB Persistence Provider.   To test with a Value Stream   Create a new Thing with some NUMBER properties, e.g. 'a', 'b' and 'c' as properties - ensure they are marked as logged as well Name = InfluxValueStreamThing Create a new ValueStream based and change its Persistance Provider to the InfluxDB created above Name = InfluxValueStream Save both Entities Setting values for the properties will now automatically create the entries in InfluxDB - including the Entity name "InfluxValueStreamThing" Running the QueryPropertyHistory service on the Thing will return the results as an InfoTable In Chronograf this will display like this:   ThingWorx 8.4 will be released end of January 2019. Be sure to check out and test the new Persistence Provider features!
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We are excited to announce ThingWorx 8.4 is now available for download!    Key functional highlights ThingWorx 8.4 covers the following areas of the product portfolio: ThingWorx Analytics and ThingWorx Foundation which includes Connection Server and Edge capabilities.   ThingWorx Foundation Next Generation Composer: File Repository Editor added for application file management New entity Config Table Editor to enable application configurability and customization Localization support fornew languages: Italian, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, Russian, Chinese/Taiwan, Chinese/Simplified Mashup Builder: Responsive Layout with new Layout Editor 13 new and updated widgets (beta) Theming Editor (beta) New Functions Editor New Personalized Workspace Platform: Added support for AzureSQL, a relational database-as-a-service (DBaaS) as the new persistence provider A PaaS database that is always running on the latest stable version of SQL Server Database Engine and  patched OS with 99.99% availability.   Added support for InfluxData, a leading time series storage platform as the new ThingWorx persistence provider Supports ingesting large amounts of IoT data and offers high availability with clustering setup New extension for Remote Access and Control Supports VNC, RDP desktop sharing for any remote device HTTP and SSH connectivity supported An optional microservice to offload the ThingWorx server by allowing query execution to occur in a separate process on the same or on a different physical machine. Installers for Postgres versions of ThingWorx running on Windows or RHEL AzureSQL InfluxDB Thing Presence feature introduced which indicates whether the connection of a thing is “normal” based on the expected behavior of the device. Remote Access Extension Query Microservice: Click and Go Installers for Windows and Linux (RHEL) Security: Major investments include updating 3rd party libraries, handling of data to address cross-site scripting (XSS)  issues and enhancements to the password policy, including a password blacklist. A significant number of security issues have been fixed in this release. It is recommended that customers upgrade as soon as possible to take advantage of these important improvements. Docker Support  Added Dockerfile as a distribution media for ThingWorx Foundation and Analytics Allows building Docker container image that unlocks the potential of Dev and Ops Note:  Legacy Composer has been removed and replaced with the New Composer.   Documentation: ThingWorx 8.4 Reference Documents ThingWorx Platform 8.4 Release Notes ThingWorx Platform Help Center ThingWorx Analytics Help Center ThingWorx Connection Services Help Center  
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Create a new Thing using the Timer Thing Template. The Timer Thing will fire a Timer Event when the Timer's Update Rate has expired. The event is automatically present and does not need to be added manually. Configuration   The Timer Configuration is quite straightforward. It can be accessed via the Thing's Entity Configuration. Configuration allows for Enabling the Timer on Thing-Startup - whenever the Thing is started, e.g. when restarting ThingWorx or via the RestartThing Generic Service, also the Timer is enabled and will fire Events. Changing the Update Rate - in which intervall the Events will be fired (by default every minute [60000 milliseconds]). Changing the User Context - in which the Events will be handled. The user will need visibility and permission on e.g. executing Services or depending Things, which are required to run the Service triggered by the Event.           Services   Timer Things inherit two Services by default from the Thing Template DisableTimer EnableTimer These will activate / de-activate the Timer and allow / disallow firing Events once the Update Rate has expired If a Timer is currently enabled or disabled can be seen in its properties  
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Fresh look at getting started with ThingWorx in a relevant context that outlines the DEVOPS needed to kick-start your programming.     For full-sized viewing, click on the YouTube link in the player controls. Visit the Online Success Guide to access our Expert Session videos at any time as well as additional information about ThingWorx training and services.
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