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    Step 5: Limiting Composer Access   If you would like to limit a User even more, there are a few things you can do. Go back to the Administrator account and open one of the accounts we created, such as User.OtherAgencies, you will notice the Enabled and Locked checkboxes. Enabled allows you to set whether an account can be used in ThingWorx during runtime. Locked dictates whether an account can be logged into at all.     Suppose we would like for the user to only see emptiness when they try to access the Composer. Follow the below steps to limit ThingWorx Composer access even more.   1. Open one of the Users we created earlier, ie User.OtherAgencies and click on the User Profile tab.  The user profile configuration allows an administrator to control which categories and entities should be displayed for an individual User.     2. You will see various sections and checkboxes. Uncheck all of them to stop access to importing, exporting, creating new Entities, being able to see existing Entities, and much more.     3. Click Save.   Now if you attempt to log into the ThingWorx Composer, you will notice a very difference experience without the ability to see current Entities. Perform this update for all the Users we created, except for User.IT and User.AgencySuperUser.     Step 6: Creating Clearance Levels   ThingWorx does not include default security clearance levels for you. What it does include are Thing Groups. Thing Groups are a reference-able entity type in ThingWorx that allow for Things and Thing Groups as its members. They also provide ThingWorx administrators the ability to manage at scale exposure of Things to only those that require access.   Before we create out first Thing Group, let us create some Entities that will house resources. The first will be an image that is top secret (shown below). In ThingWorx, this would be of type Media. After, we will create a file repository that will contain super-secret documents, a repository for job applications, and another repository for documents that are publicly accessible.   Our Top Secret Image:     Create the Media Entity    Let us store our image in ThingWorx. This image will need extra credentials to access it. This authentication can be performed with a basic username/password setup or SSO utilizing your own configurations.   1.  In the ThingWorx Composer, click the + New button in the top left.    2. In the dropdown list, click Media.   3. In the Name field, use TopSecretImage.   4. Set the Project field to an existing Project (ie, PTCDefaultProject) and click Save. 5. Click Change and add an image or use the image above.     6. Click on the Configuration tab.     7. For the Authentication Type field, select basic. You can select other types based on your Single Sign On and server level configurations, but we will keep this scenario simple.     8. Set a Username and Password that would be used to access our top secret Media.     9. Click Save.   Create the File Repositories   Let us create the setup for our repositories.   1.  In the ThingWorx Composer, click the + New button in the top left.    2. In the dropdown list, click Thing.     3. In the Name field, use TopSecretDocuments and FileRepository as the Base Thing Template.     4. Click Save.  5. Repeat steps 1-4 to create two File Repositories titled JobApplications and PublicDocuments.     Security Levels and Resource Lockdown    We now have our several resources and areas for differing levels of access. We will create 3 Thing Groups to mimic security levels. Our top-secret image will exist independently on ThingWorx, but also inside of a file repository for some level of redundancy. That file repository will belong to one Thing Group, while the other two file repositories will have their own separate Thing Groups.   1. Open the TopSecretDocuments File Repository Thing.  2. Click on the Services tab.     3. Scroll down to the SaveImage and click the play button.      4. Enter a path (such as /SecretImage.png) for the image to reside on the server and click Change to add an image.     5. Click the Execute button.    You now have your image in a File Repository. Let us add this Entity to a Thing Group, then configure the permissions at the Thing Group level.   1.  In the ThingWorx Composer, click the + New button in the top left.      2. In the dropdown list, click Thing Group.     3. In the Name field enter Clearance.Top.     4. Set the Project field to an existing Project (ie, PTCDefaultProject) and click Save. 5. Click the Services tab and click the play button to execute the AddMembers Service.     6. Click on the members Input Info Table and click the + Add button.      7. Enter TopSecretDocuments as the name of the member and Thing as the type. 8. Click Add and Save. Set the Project field to an existing Project (ie, PTCDefaultProject).      9. With you members set, click Execute. 10. Repeat steps 1-9 to create two more Thing Groups and add the other File Repository Entities that we created earlier. Name these Thing Groups Clearance.Public and Clearance.HumanResources. If we wanted to, we could create a Thing Group to add here as a member of another Thing Groups’ hierarchy.   Thing Group Permissions    Time to set the permissions. With the Clearance.Top Thing Group selected, follow the below instructions. As mentioned before, in a production system, you would have more Users and User Groups to completely setup this scenario.   1. Click Permissions. 2. For Visibility, enter PTCDefenseDepartment into the filter.  3. Expand the Organization and select the Agents unit and click Save. 4. Click the Run Time tab. 5. Set the permissions for the Agency.Agents User Group to have full access as shown below:  6. Click Save.  7. Repeat steps 1-6 for our other security clearance Thing Groups. Set the permissions to a department and User Group that you see fit.     Step 7: Next Steps   Congratulations! You've successfully completed the Securing Resources and Private Data guide. In this guide, you learned how to:   Securing data and private information Use Services, Alerts, and Subscriptions to handle processes without human interaction Handling group and organization permissions   The next guide in the Utilizing ThingWorx to Secure Your Aerospace and Defense Systems learning path is Connecting External Databases and Model.    Learn More   We recommend the following resources to continue your learning experience:   Capability Guide Build ThingWorx Solutions in Food Industry Build Design Your Data Model Build Implement Services, Events, and Subscriptions   Additional Resources   If you have questions, issues, or need additional information, refer to:   Resource Link Community Developer Community Forum
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  Setup methods and schemes to secure your data   Guide Concept   Securing data is often something thought of after an application is designed. It should always be the first and more important.   These concepts and steps will allow you to focus on development of your application while still allowing the ability to utilize the power of ThingWorx!   We will teach you how to design a secure environment and application from scratch     You'll learn how to   How to design and implement organizations and organization sections Creating secure User Groups with specific goals Limit access to resources   NOTE:  The estimated time to complete this guide is 30 minutes     Step 1: Examples and Strategy   If you’d like to skip ahead, download and unzip the completed example of the Aerospace and Defense learning path: AerospaceEntitiesGuide1.zip. Import the .twx files included.   In an ever-changing world, you are going to need to protect everything that is considered private. This includes your data, the data people provide you, and the resources you consider important. All of this can be done using the ThingWorx environment. ThingWorx provides a system for security that can be configured endlessly. There is the security being handled at the server level internally and with Apache, in which you have access to. The security being handled in the ThingWorx Composer, which you can customize. Lastly, there is the security you provide at the client side for users accessing your application or system.   Let us start working on securing our system before we add extra users and workers. First, we will create and organization and organization levels within our agency to help designate access. We will create the security access to the ThingWorx Composer, which is where our data will be held for now in this learning path. We will then create access levels for internal employees, including administrators, developers, and workers based on security clearance levels.     Step 2: Setup Organizations and Departments   Creating Our Organizations   If you need a refresher on how to create security groups and permissions, take a look back at our Configure Permissions Guide. If you are ready to get started, follow the instructions below:   1.  In the ThingWorx Composer, click the + New button in the top left.    2. In the dropdown list, click Organizations.      3. In the Name field, give our agency name, such as PTCDefenseDepartment.   4. Set the Project field to an existing Project (ie, PTCDefaultProject) and click Save to save your work. 5. Go to the Organization tab and you will see the beginning of our Organization.     Creating Our Departments    Let us add some departments in our Organizations. We will add a few here but add as many as you like. Just keep in mind, these departments do not need to match every department in the actual Organization. These departments will be used for access to different resources.   1. Click on the first unit and update the Name field to DefenseDepartment. Click the check mark to save your changes.   NOTE: You can add the spaces if it looks better to you. You will be using these departments throughout this learning path. You can also change these later.   2. Under our first unit (DefenseDepartment), click the green + button. Name this unit HumanResources.     3. Repeat the last step to create three more departments under our DefenseDepartment unit. Name these new units Agents, Visitors, and IT.   4. Under the Visitors unit, click the green + button to add a unit and name it Applicants.     5. Repeat the last step to add one more unit under the Visitors unit. Name this group OtherAgencies. Your setup should have the following departments.      You now have a complete start to our agency. What does that mean exactly? An Organization allows us to limit resources to only members of that overall Organization or specific unit within that Organization. You will get firsthand experience as we move further in this guide.    Let us create our Security Groups to those that will absolutely need it. This is a big decision point into how you would like to do this and there is no truly wrong answer. Will each user for this application or utility have their own User account in ThingWorx or share User accounts based on usage? Will you grant access to this application through LDAP, database verification, or a Create An Authentication Extension. The list of questions into what is supported for authentication in ThingWorx is almost endless.     Step 3: Setup Users and User Groups   Creating User Groups and Users   For simplicity and timing, we will create a User Group and User for each department (be mindful of the number of allowed Users in the ThingWorx version you are using). We will also create a super user account that will provide us with full access. Finally, we will need to create an extra User Groups for ThingWorx Composer access.     First, User Groups   1. In the ThingWorx Composer, click the + New at the top left of the screen.     2. Select User Groups in the dropdown.     3. Name the User Group Agency.ComposerAccess.     4. Set the Project field to an existing Project (ie, PTCDefaultProject) and click Save. 5. Repeat steps 1-4 to create a User Group for each department (Agency.HumanResources, Agency.Agents, Agency.Visitors, Agency.Applicants, Agency.OtherAgencies, and Agency.IT).   Now, Users   1. In the ThingWorx Composer, click the + New at the top left of the screen.     2. Select User in the dropdown.     3. Name the User User.AgencySuperUser and add a password.     4. Set the Project field to an existing Project (ie, PTCDefaultProject) and click Save. 5. Repeat steps 1-4 to create a User for each department (User.HumanResources, User.Agents, User.Visitors, User.Applicants, User.OtherAgencies, and User.IT).   Adding Members to User Groups   Assign each user to the corresponding User Group using the below instructions.   1. Open the Agency.HumanResources User Group.  2. Click on the Manager Members tab.     3. Filter and select the User you want to add in the Available Members section. In this case, User.HumanResources. 4. Click the arrow on that User’s row or drag and drop the User to the Members section.      5. Click Save. 6. Repeat steps 1-5 for each department User Group you created earlier with their corresponding User.   We should have an extra User Group (Agency.ComposerAccess) and an extra User (User.AgencySuperUser). We will utilize these Entities below. For now, only our IT department needs access to the ThingWorx Composer.   1. Open the Agency.ComposerAccess User Group.  2. Click on the Manager Members tab.     3. Filter and select the User Group you want to add in the Available Members section. In this case, Agency.IT. 4. Click the arrow on that User’s row or drag the User to the Members section.      5. Click Save.   Our super user will need top level access to everything in ThingWorx. To do this, we will add the User to the Administrators User Group.   1. On the left-hand side of the ThingWorx Composer, click Browse. 2. Click on User Groups on the left panel.     3. At the top of the screen, click the filter button near the search bar. 4. Check the checkbox for Show System Objects and click Apply.     5. Filter and select the Administrators User Group.    6. Click on the Manager Members tab.     7. Filter and select the User you want to add in the Available Members section. In this case, User.AgencySuperUser. 8. Click the arrow on that User’s row or drag the User to the Members section.    9. Click Save.     Step 4: Setup Permissions   Setting Bulk Permissions   1. On the left panel, select Permissions.   2. Click Collections on the menu that appears.     3. Select the checkbox at the top to select all available Entities then click Edit Permissions.     4. On the Visibility tab, click the + button in the Search Organizations filter. 5. Enter PTCDefenseDepartment and click the expand arrows to select the IT department. A more granular Visibility level can be set on the specific Entities when created later in this learning path.     6. Select the Design Time tab. 7. Enter Agency.ComposerAccess in the search bar and select the Agency.ComposerAccess User Group.   8. Select the check marks for Create, Read, Update, and Delete. A more expansive design for a production environment would create more Users and User Groups to have such access.     9. Set the permissions for the other groups we have created to not allow any Create, Read, Update, and Delete permissions for groups outside of Agency.ComposerAccess and Agency.IT. It should look like the below configuration.     10. Set the same permissions in the Run Time tab for the User Groups we have created.     11. Click Save.   Now, if you log into the ThingWorx Composer using any account other than our super user account or the User.IT account, you’ll see that you may be able to see Entities, but you cannot open them. You will see an unauthorized popup. If you have access to a browser with a Private or Incognito mode, use it instead of logging out of your Administrator account.     Click here to view Part 2 of this guide.
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  Create An Application Key Guide   Overview   In order for a device to send data to the Platform, it needs to be authenticated. One authentication method is to use an Application Key. Application Keys, or appKeys, are security tokens used for authentication in ThingWorx. They are associated with a given User and have all of the permissions granted to the User with which they are associated. This is one of the most common ways of assigning permission control to a connected device. NOTE: This guide's content aligns with ThingWorx 9.3. The estimated time to complete this guide is 30 minutes.    Step 1: Learning Path Overview   This guide explains the steps to create a ThingWorx Application Key, and is part of a Learning Path. You can use this guide independently from the full Learning Path. If you want to learn to create a ThingWorx Application Key, this guide will be useful to you. When used as part of the Industrial Plant Learning Path, you should already have installed ThingWorx Kepware Server. We will use the Application Key to send information from ThingWorx Kepware Server into ThingWorx Foundation. Other guides demonstrate Foundation's Mashup Builder to construct a website dashboard that displays information from ThingWorx Kepware Server. We hope you enjoy this Learning Path.   Step 2: Create Application Key   Application Keys are assigned to a specific User for secure access to the platform. Using the Application Key for the default User (Administrator) is not recommended. If administrative access is absolutely necessary, create a User and place the User as a member of the SecurityAdministrators and Administrators User groups. Create the User the Application Key will be assigned to. 1. On the Home screen of Composer click + New. 2. In the dropdown list, click Applications Key. 3. Give your application key a name (i.e. MyAppKey). 4. If Project is not already set, click the + in the Project text box and select the PTCDefaultProject. 5. Set the User Name Reference to a User you created. 6. Update the Expiration Date field, otherwise it will default to 1 day. 7. Click Save. A Key ID has been generated and can be used to make secure connections.   IP Whitelisting for Application Keys   One of the features of an Application Key is the ability to set an IP whitelist. This allows the server to specify that only certain IP addresses should be able to use a given Key ID for access. This is a great way to lock down security on the platform for anything that will maintain a static IP address. For example, connected Web-based business systems may have a static IP from which all calls should be made. Similarly, you can use wildcards to specify a network to narrow the range of IP addresses allowed while still offering some flexibility for devices with dynamic IP addresses. Extremely mobile devices should likely not attempt to implement this, however, as they will often change networks and IP addresses and may lose the ability to connect when the IP whitelist feature is used.   Interact with Application Keys Programmatically Service Name Description GetKeyID Returns the ID of this Application Key GetUserName Get the username associated with this Application Key IsExpired Returns if this Application Key is expired ResetExpirationDateToDefault Resets the expiration date of the Application Key to the default time based on configuration in the UserManagement subsystem SetClientName Sets the client name for this Application Key SetExpirationDate Sets the expiration date of this Application Key to a provided date SetIPWhiteList Sets the values for the IP whitelist for this Application Key SetUserName Sets the associated user name for this Application Key   Tip: To learn more about Application Keys, refer to the Help Center   Step 3: Next Steps   Congratulations! You have successfully created an application key. We hope you found this guide useful.     The next guide in the Connect and Monitor Industrial Plant Equipment learning path is Install ThingWorx Kepware Server.    The next guide in the Azure MXChip Development Kit learning path is Connect Azure IoT Devices.   The next guide in the Medical Device Service learning path is Use the Edge MicroServer (EMS) to Connect to ThingWorx.   The next guide in the Using an Allen-Bradley PLC with ThingWorx learning path is Model an Allen-Bradley PLC.
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Configure Permissions Guide Part 2   Step 5: Permissions   These permissions can be accessed on any Entity created on the platform. All Entities have permission control for both design time and run time. Permission Time Control Design time Controls what Users are able to do with Entities themselves while building the solution. Run time Controls what the Users are able to do with the data for an Entity when they use the solution.   Permission Type Description Property Read Read property values Property Write Update property values Service Execute Execute Services in this Entity Event Execute Queue or fire Events in this Entity Event Subscribe Ability to subscribe to Events in this Entity   Access Type Description Allow Allow the User's access to this feature. Deny Deny the User's access to this feature. Inherit Set the User's access to this feature based on permissions in Entities this Entity is based on or the configurations at a higher level.   Add Permissions for an Entity   Once an Entity has been selected for editing, select the Permissions tab. Based on what you would like to edit, select the Visibility, Design Time or Run Time tab. The All Properties, Services, and Events section provides blanket security to all of these features for a User Group or User. The Property, Service, or Event Overrides section is used for any overrides that need to be made for specific features. In the example blow, the User a.jones has the ability to read properties, fire events, and subscribe to events. The User does not have the ability to update a property or execute a Service. In the second section, a.jones is allowed to call the GetConfigurationTable Service (even though he was restricted from doing so in the other section).   To set a permission, filter and select a User/User Group. When their name is in the table, click the Permission Type you would like for this Entity. Default permissions are added to the User or User Group you filtered and selected. This will be full access permissions unless you've changed one of the fields.   Set Permissions Programmatically   In some cases it will be useful to set permissions using a programmable interface. This can be done through a built-in set of services which can be accessed in many different ways including: Internal service call through an entity’s service Service call using the extension framework, or REST API call to a service on the platform. The following is a list of services built into all entities on the platform. Service Name Description AddDesignTimePermission Adds a new design time permission AddRunTimePermission Adds a new run time permission CheckDesignTimePermission Checks to see if an entity has a specific design time permission for the current User CheckDesignTimePermissionForGroup Checks to see if an entity has a specific design time permission for a given User Group CheckDesignTimePermissionForUser Checks to see if an entity has a specific design time permission for a given User CheckPermission Checks to see if the entity has a specific run time permission for the current User CheckTimePermissionForGroup Checks to see if the entity has a specific run time permission for a given User Group CheckDesignTimePermissionForUser Checks to see if the entity has a specific run time permission for a given User DeleteDesignTimePermission Delete a design time permission DeleteRunTimePermission Delete a run time permission GetDesignTimePermission Get a list of design time permissions in Info Table format GetDesignTimePermissionAsJSON Get a list of design time permissions in JSON format GetPermissionsForCurrentUser Get the run time permissions for the current User GetPermissionsForGroup Get the run time permissions for a given User Group GetPermissionsForUser Get the run time permissions for a given User GetRunTimePermissions Get a list of assigned run time permissions in Info Table format GetRunTimePermissionAsJSON Get a list of assigned run time permissions in JSON form SetDesignTimePermissionAsJSON Sets all of the run time permissions for a given Entity to the given JSON list You may want to apply a set of permissions to a large group of Entities at once. This can be done using either the projects or the tags feature on the platform through the EntityServices resource. The EntityServices resource has many useful services in it, but for the purpose of this section, we will only talk about the run time permission service. This will act on all entities with the provided tags or assigned to the given project. Service Name Description SetEntityPermission Sets run time permissions for a set of Entities   Step 6: Application Keys   Application Keys   Application Keys or appKeys are security tokens used for authentication in ThingWorx when not using a standard credentials method of authentication. They are associated with a given user and have all of the permissions granted to the user to which they are associated.   Create an Application Key   Using the Application Key for the default user (Administrator) is not recommended. If administrative access is absolutely necessary, create a user and place the user as a member of the SecurityAdministrators and Administrators user groups. Create the User the Application Key will be assigned to. On the Home screen of Composer click + New. In the dropdown list, click Applications Keys. Use MyAppKey  for the name your Application Key. Set the User Name Reference to a User you created and set the Project field (ie, PTCDefaultProject). The Expiration Date field will default to 1 day. Click Save. A Key ID has been generated and can be used to make secure connections.   IP Whitelisting for Application Keys   One of the features of an Application Key is the ability to set an IP whitelist. This allows the server to specify that only certain IP addresses should be able to use a given Key ID for access. This is a great way to lock down security on the platform for anything that will maintain a static IP address. For example, connected Web-based business systems may have a static IP from which all calls should be made. Similarly, you can use wildcards to specify a network to narrow the range of IP addresses allowed while still offering some flexibility for devices with dynamic IP addresses. Extremely mobile devices should likely not attempt to implement this however as they will often change networks and IP addresses and may lose the ability to connect when the IP whitelist feature is used.   Interact with Application Keys Programmatically   Service Name Description GetKeyID Returns the ID of this application key GetUserName Get the user name associated with this application key IsExpired Returns if this application key is expired ResetExpirationDateToDefault Resets the expiration date of the application key to the default time based on configuration in the UserManagement subsystem SetClientName Sets the client name for this application key SetExpirationDate Sets the expiration date of this application key to a provided date SetIPWhiteList Sets the values for the IP whitelist for this application key SetUserName Sets the associated user name for this application key TIP: To learn more about Application Keys, refer to the Create an Application Key Guide.   Step 7: Organizations   Organizations are hierarchical structures that allow the user to assign visibility to entities in the ThingWorx Model. This model provides the top down structure from the highest level in an organization or department, to the lower levels of said entity. Each level within this structure also allows for users and groups to be added. This provides a greater level of customization to resources within the ThingWorx Composer.   Create an Organization In the ThingWorx Composer, click the + New at the top of the screen. Select Organization in the dropdown. Name your Organization Constructors. Set the Project field (ie, PTCDefaultProject) and click Save Select the Organization tab to see the hierarchy. With the top organization selected, in the Members search bar, search for the user you have created yourself and add them.   Create Organizational Units   Click the green + under the structure you would like to expand. Name your Organization unit UpperManagement. In the Members search bar, search for the user or user group you created and add it. Click Save. Repeat the steps to create the full heirarchy of the organization and its department/unit members.   Setup Entity Visibility   ThingWorx provides added security checks and access control with Entity visibility. Visibility ensures an entity is accessible to members of an organizational unit. Those members will then have access to the entity and the underlying security model determines what specific interaction any users that are members of that organization unit may have with a specific asset. If a user in the system is not granted visibility, then that asset essentially does not exist within that user’s domain. Select the Permissions tab of any custom Thing in Composer. Filter and select Constructors in the Search Organizations field. Click Save. Login Pages for Organization   Creating an Organization automatically creates a login page for you. If you would like to add more to this login screen and customize it to fit your needs, create a Mashup and set it to the Organization's Home Mashup field. If you plan to use a Login Screen, use the View Mashup URL generated from the Login Mashup you create. To view the login page of your application (whether custom or default), type the following URL: [server]/Thingworx/FormLogin/ (ie, localhost/Thingworx/FormLogin/Constructors).     Step 8: Next Steps   Congratulations! You've successfully completed the Configure Permissions guide, and learned how to: Configure and utilize the user access system Control permissions at design time and run time   The next guide in the Getting Started on the ThingWorx Platform learning path is Build a Predictive Analytics Model.    If you are completing the Connect and Configure Industrial Devices and Systems learning path, the next guide is Choose a Connectivity Method.   Learn More   We recommend the following resources to continue your learning experience: Capability Guide Build Design Your Data Model   Additional Resources   If you have questions, issues, or need additional information, refer to: Resource Link Support Help Center    
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  Learn how to create or update your system to be more secure   GUIDE CONCEPT   ThingWorx allows for a layer of security within your company or organization to be utilized for authentication and user management.   These concepts and steps will allow you to focus on development of your application while still allowing the ability to utilize the power of ThingWorx!   We will teach you how to enable and configure ThingWorx to perform your security needs.   YOU'LL LEARN HOW TO   Securing data and private information Use services, alerts, and subscriptions to handle processes without human interaction Handling group and organization permissions   NOTE:  The estimated time to complete this guide is 60 minutes.     Step 1: Examples and Strategy   Download the attached FoodIndustry.zip users and extract/import the contents. These are to be used as you work through this learning path. For the completed example, download FoodIndustryComplete.zip.   In this tutorial we continue with our real-world scenario for the Fizos food company. We already have our factory data, automated cooking processed for our sausage product lines, and an automated process for picking up and delivering goods. What we need now is to ensure our organization, security groups, and data is truly secure. Having security permissions at each level and each type of entity involved with our company enables us to have full control over every aspect.   Setting Up Organizations   Organizations are hierarchical structures that allow the user to assign visibility to entities in the ThingWorx Model. This model provides the top down structure from the highest level in an organization or department, to the lower levels of said entity. Each level within this structure also allows for users and groups to be added. This provides a greater level of customization to resources within the ThingWorx Composer.   We will not only create an organization that represents Fizos, but we will have membership in the organization to represent partners, external users, guests, etc. With this level of granularity, we have more control over what is happening at each level.   In the ThingWorx Composer, click the + New at the top of the screen.   Select Organization in the dropdown. Name your Organization Fizos.  Set the Project field (ie, PTCDefaultProject). Click Save   Select the Organization tab to see the hierarchy. Select Unit 1 in the middle of the canvas. Update the Name field to Company and save your changes.   Create Additional Organization Units   Now let's add a node for Employees, Interfaces(APIs), Partners, Customers, Guests, and other groups we might consider important.   Click the green + under the structure you would like to expand. Name your Organization unit Employees. Click Save. We won't add groups as yet. We will do that in the following sections.   Repeat the steps to create the full top level units. It should look similar to the following: We now have the starting structures for Fizos. Next, we will need to add security groups and more units.       Step 2: Creating Security Groups   In many IoT solutions there will be a large scale of users using the system. Because of this it doesn’t make sense to manually set the permissions of every user added to the system. This is why we created User Groups. User Groups provide a role-based approach to permissions and exist to give similar users the same permissions across multiple entities on the platform. User groups set permissions exactly the same way as users do (see next section), but you can simply add a user to a user group in order to set permissions at scale.   Creating a user group such as Fizos.External.SecurityGroup would allow you to have a group with no design time permissions, but allow run time permissions for specific aspects of your solution such as reading product pricing from a service. Similarly you could create a user group called Fizos.Developers.SecurityGroup (under the Employees unit) who would have design time and run time permissions to work on your solution.   Create Security Groups   In the ThingWorx Composer, click the + New at the top of the screen.   Select User Group in the dropdown. Name your group Fizos.Partners.SecurityGroup. Set the Project field with an existing Project (ie, PTCDefaultProject). Click Save.   Repeat these steps to create more user groups for each of the top level units we created in the last section (Customers, External, Interfaces, Employees). We can also add in some groups from the companies we listed as customers and partners earlier in this learning path. Below is an example of all the groups I created for this example:   NOTE: Individual user permissions will override group user permissions. In other words, if you initially add a user to a group so they inherit the permissions of the group, you will still be able to customize permissions for an individual user in that group as needed.   Default User Groups   The platform has a few user groups included in the platform by default. These are used to set up common roles that are often associated with using the platform and have built in permissions. These groups are not meant to be used when creating new applications or general permissions.   Step 3: Configuring Permissions   These permissions can be accessed on any entity created on the platform. All entities have permission control for both design time and run time. Permission Time Control Design time Controls what users are able to do with entities themselves while building the solution. Run time Controls what the users are able to do with the data for an entity when they use the solution. Permission Type Description Property Read Read property values Property Write Update property values Service Execute Execute Services in this Entity Event Execute Queue or fire Events in this Entity Event Subscribe Ability to subscribe to Events in this Entity Access Type Description Allow Allow the user's access to this feature. Deny Deny the user's access to this feature. Inherit Set the user's access to this feature based on permissions in Entities this Entity is based on or the configurations at a higher level.   Add Permissions for an Entity   Once an entity has been selected for editing, select the Permissions tab. Based on what you would like to edit, select the Design Time or Run Time tab.   The All Properties, Services, and Events section provides blanket security to all of these features for a group or user. The Property, Service, or Event Overrides section is used for any overrides that need to be made for specific features.   In the example blow, the User a.jones has the ability to read properties, fire events, and subscribe to events. The User does not have the ability to update a property or execute a Service. In the second section, a.jones is allowed to call the GetConfigurationTable Service (even though he was restricted from doing so in the other section).   To set a permission, filter and select a User/User Group. When their name is in the table, click the Permission Type you would like for this Entity. Default permissions are added to the User or User Group you filtered and selected. This will be full access permissions unless you've changed one of the fields.   Bulk Permissions Handling   When you would like to set the permissions to an entity in bulk, ie permissions for all Things, you can use the Collections option.   On the left hand side, click the lock. Click the Collections option under Permissions. Select the checkbox next to Things. Click Edit Permissions button. Now you will see the same interface you used above, except this time, it will be for all Things instead of a singular entity. You can use these permission settings to stop access to all of the entities you would not want an external user being able to see.   Bulk Permissions Reporting   When you would like to verify the permissions to an entity, ie permissions for all Fizos.Logistics, you can use the Access Report option.   On the left hand side, click the lock. Click the Access Report option under Permissions. Set the User or User Group. (in this case Fizos.VizosMeatMarket.SecurityGroup) Set the Entity (in this case Fizos.Logistics) Click Apply.     You will be able to see what this User Group has access to as it pertains to the Fizos.Logistics Entity. Try other Entities and User Groups.   Step 4: Next Steps   Congratulations! You've successfully completed the Securing Industry Data guide. In this guide, you learned how to:   Securing data and private information Use services, alerts, and subscriptions to handle processes without human interaction Handling group and organization permissions   If you wish to return to the learning path, click Complex and Automatic Food and Beverage Systems Learning Path   Learn More   We recommend the following resources to continue your learning experience: Capability Guide Build ThingWorx Solutions in Food Industry Build Design Your Data Model Build Implement Services, Events, and Subscriptions   Additional Resources   If you have questions, issues, or need additional information, refer to: Resource Link Community Developer Community Forum  
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Configure Permissions Guide Part 1   Overview   This project will introduce you to permissions inside of the ThingWorx platform. Permissions are used to control usage during development, runtime, and experience. Following the steps in this guide, you will be able to create Users, User Groups, Application Keys, and Organizations and tie them together. We will teach you how to create functional permission schemes in the ThingWorx platform to create a secure application and development environment.   NOTE: This guide's content aligns with ThingWorx 9.3. The estimated time to complete ALL 2 parts of this guide is 30 minutes.    Step 1: Completed Example   Download and unzip the completed files attached to this tutorial: PermissionsEntities.zip.   In this tutorial, we walk through security concepts within ThingWorx. Utilize this file to see a finished example and return to it as a reference if you become stuck creating your own fully flushed out application.   Keep in mind, this download uses the exact names for entities used in this tutorial. If you would like to import this example and also create entities on your own, change the names of the entities you create.   Step 2: Common Terms   It is important to understand the terminology before creating Users, Groups, and Permissions: Term Definition Entity Generic name for any of the customizable building blocks inside the ThingWorx Platform User An Entity dedicated to identifying a person or device accessing the platform User Group An Entity that defines role-based permissions for Users in bulk Tags and Projects Mechanisms used to group Entities together by marking them as similar or related Composer The ThingWorx GUI tool for building your solution Resource A collection of Services which are not stateful (i.e. they do not have Properties, Events, etc.); they can be found in Composer under the System category Organization Hierarchical structures that allow you to assign visibility to Entities in the ThingWorx Model     Step 3: Users   Users represent an individual person or connected system. They contain information such as a username, email, and password (Standard Credentials) as well as peripheral information such as Name of the actual person/system/device it was created for. Users can be created, updated, and deleted just like every other Entity.   Create User   In the ThingWorx Composer, click the + New at the top of the screen. Select User in the dropdown. Name the User default_user and add a password. Set the Project field (ie, PTCDefaultProject) and click Save. User-Related Services   There are a few Services available through a resource called EntityServices, that allow you to interact with user entities programmatically.   Once a user has been created, you can interact with it through some built-in Services:     Default Users   There are two key users built into every instance of ThingWorx when initially created.   Administrator: When setting up your platform, you'll use the Administrator user first, because it is the user that will allow you to set up new users and assign them to Administrator or other roles.   NOTE: It is extremely important to reset the Administrator password after your first login. Leaving the default password could allow the system to be compromised in the future.   System User: The System User is created to allow service chaining on a given Thing when a user may not have direct permissions for every part of the chain. It exists so that access to given Services can be granted based on some previous logic instead of direct overarching permissions. For example: if the user is within the building, then trigger a Service, otherwise do not trigger the Service.     Step 4: User Groups   In many IoT solutions there will be a large scale of Users using the system. Because of this it doesn’t make sense to manually set the permissions of every User added to the system. This is why we created User Groups. User Groups provide a role-based approach to permissions and exist to give similar Users the same permissions across multiple Entities on the platform. User groups set permissions exactly the same way as Users do (see next section), but you can simply add a User to a User Group in order to set permissions at scale. For example: Creating a User group such as "Solution Architects" would allow you to do something like set all permissions for design time but limit permissions for run time. Similarly you could create a user group called "Solution Users" who have no design time permissions and specific run time permissions.   Create Group and Add Users   In the ThingWorx Composer, click the + New at the top of the screen. Select User Group in the dropdown. Name your group ExampleGroup. Set the Project field (ie, PTCDefaultProject) and click Save. Click Members to view current members in the group. Filter and select the user you want to add in the Available Members section. Click the arrow on their row or drag the User to the Members section. Click Save. NOTE: Individual user permissions will override group user permissions. In other words, if you initially add a user to a group so they inherit the permissions of the group, you will still be able to customize permissions for an individual user in that group as needed.   User Group Services   There are a few Services available through a resource called EntityServices, that allow you to interact with user group entities programmatically. Service Name Description CreateGroup Creates a new User Group DeleteGroup Deletes a user Group   Once a group has been created you can interact with it through built-in services to add or remove a User. Service Name Description AddMember Adds a User or User Group to this group AssignMembers Adds a list of Users or User Groups to this group DeleteMember Removes a User or User Group from the members of this group     Default User Groups   The platform has a few User Groups included in the platform by default. These are used to set up common roles that are often associated with using the platform and have built in permissions.   Click here to view Part 2 of this guide. 
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  Create users, security groups, and provide a method to authenticate with LDAP.   Guide Concept   LDAP allows for a layer of security within your company or organization to be utilized for authentication or user management.   These concepts and steps will allow you to focus on development of your application while still allowing the ability to utilize the power of ThingWorx!   We will teach you how to enable LDAP authentication in ThingWorx and configuring ThingWorx to connect to a LDAP server.   You'll learn how to   How to enable LDAP Authentication on ThingWorx Configuring ThingWorx to connect to an LDAP server Importing users from LDAP   NOTE: This guide's content aligns with ThingWorx 9.3. The estimated time to complete this guide is 60 minutes     Step 1: Completed Example   Download the completed files for this tutorial: ApacheDSExample.xml. This guide will cover authentication with an ApacheDS LDAP server.   In this tutorial, we walk through security concepts within ThingWorx. Utilize this file to see a finished example and return to it as a reference if you become stuck creating your own fully flushed out application.   Keep in mind, this download uses the exact names for entities used in this tutorial. If you would like to import this example and also create entities on your own, change the names of the entities you create.       Step 2: Understanding Directory Services   ThingWorx provides built-in LDAP Directory Support for clear-text connections (port 389). In order to enable LDAP Authentication, a Directory Service Entity must be imported and configured. The sample download provided is setup for Apache DS. An Active Directory example and a OpenLDAP example are attached, but will not be covered here. Other LDAP providers will need a similar file.   Users can exist in any Directory Services location as all Directory Services will be tried in order of priority when a user logs in. For the default setting, LDAP Directory Service will have priority over the ThingWorx one once enabled. To modify this configuration on the provided example, follow the below steps (if you have not done so already, import the XML file that was provided into The ThingWorx Composer):   From the ThingWorx Composer, go to the SECURITY section and click Directory Service. Open the Directory Service Entity you imported, ApacheDS. Enable LDAP in the General Properties section by checkicking the Enabled checkbox.   4. (Optional) Set the priority for the authentication if you have multiple Directory Service entities configured: Use the Priority property to assign an order of authentication to log in. The lower the number the higher the priority (1 is the highest priority). 5. Click Save to save ApacheDS and enable LDAP authentication. ThingWorx will contact the LDAP server to check for the given username when a user then tries to authenticate. If the user is not found or if the authentication on the LDAP server fails then the ThingWorx Directory Service will be tried.     Step 3: Configure ThingWorx and ApacheDS   This section will create an LDAP server, create the connection, and configure LDAP utilizing ApacheDS and Apache Directory Studio. In order to fully run this example, you will need to initially create this server OR deploy this server to a ThingWorx accessible location.   If you do not have an LDAP server already setup, utilize the below instructions to get started. If you already have a LDAP server setup, skip to the Configure ThingWorx For LDAP Connection section to configure the connection in ThingWorx.   Create New LDAP Server and Connection:   Open Apache Directory Studio. Right-click in the LDAP Servers section and select New -> New Server.   Select your version of ApacheDS in the menu and click Finish.   Right-click the newly created LDAP server and select Open Configuration.   Update the Port for the LDAP server to 389 and uncheck the LDAPS server.   Click Partitions at the bottom of the configuration and click Add.   Set the new Partition ID to ThingWorx. Set the Suffix value of the Partition to ou=people, dc=thingworx.   Save and close the configurations. Right-click the LDAP server and select Run. Once the State of the LDAP server has changed to Started, right-click the LDAP server and select Create Connection.   Utilize the ApacheDS adding entries guide to create users for your new LDAP server then follow the below instruction to create the ThingWorx connection. Configure ThingWorx For LDAP Connection: The sample XML files provided are configured with the most common attribute for the platform. From the ThingWorx Composer, go to the SECURITY section and click Directory Service. Open the Directory Service Entity you imported, ApacheDS. Generally, only one Entity listed unless multiple authentication realms have been configured. Click Congifurations to bring up Directory Service configuration details. Update the configuration parameters for the LDAP server: server: The hostname of the LDAP server userIdAttribute: LDAP attribute that is used to uniquely identify the user logging in. This property should be set to the name of the attribute containing the user's username. port: Connection port for the LDAP server. LDAP standard port is 389. If the LDAP server's connection port is 636, it is very likely that the server is expecting LDAPS, which ThingWorx does not currently support. adminBindDN: The full distinguished name for the user that the ThingWorx server will use for browsing the LDAP directory tree. The user that is defined here must have Read permissions on the directory tree. Generic Format: uid=admin, ou=Users, dc=company, dc=com userBaseDN: Distinguished name for the parent organizational unit (OU) containing any user that will need to log in. *Generic Format*: ou=ThingWorxUsers, ou=Users, dc=company, dc=com adminPassword: The password for the user configured in adminBindDN above   Click Save to update the ApacheDS Directory Service.       Step 4: Import Users Into ThingWorx   Handling Password Configurations: User must have a corresponding ThingWorx user created on the server before a user can log into ThingWorx via LDAP. These users must be created manually before they can log into the ThingWorx server All User entities created on ThingWorx matching LDAP users must have a password set, otherwise LDAP will not be able to log in. This password should NOT be the user's LDAP password The password used within ThingWorx should be secure/randomly generated. If LDAP authentication fails, ThingWorx will fall back on the password set for this user. The code provided below generates a random password for the users it creates Custom Service for User and Password Generation: A custom service can be created on a Service-Providing Thing instance that creates a specific user and assign it a home mashup: A Service-Providing Thing is an entity that uses the *GenericThing** ThingTemplate. It does not store properties. Instead, it provides useful Services that retrieve and compile data from many Thing instances for use in Mashups and/or other services. To create a Service-Providing Thing: Create a new Thing, and name it LDAPServiceHelper. Set the Thing Template to GenericThing. Click Services and create a new Service called CreateLDAPUser. Set the Inputs to be the following: Username (STRING, required) HomeMashup (MASHUPNAME, optional) Use the following for the source code: // ThingWorx will fall back on ThingWorx Directory Service (Local authentication) // if LDAP authentication fails, which means the password that we have to set for // the new user could also be used to log the user in. // Using a random string will make it highly unlikely that a user / attacker can // use the ThingWorx password to log in. var randompass = Math.random().toString(36).slice(-10); var params1 = { name: Username, password: randompass, description: "Generated LDAP User" }; Resources["EntityServices"].CreateUser(params1); // By default non-admin users will be directed to SQUEAL. // If there is a specific mashup that the user should see instead, // the following code will configure it based on the HomeMashup optional parameter. // The mashup passed to this service must exist. if (HomeMashup !== null) { var params2 = { name: HomeMashup }; Users[Username].SetHomeMashup(params2); } 6. Click Done. 7. Click Save.   Execute the newly created Service for each user in the LDAP system. Once all users have been imported (or at least the ones who need immediate access) the Directory Service must be enabled for ThingWorx to begin authenticating users via LDAP.       Step 5: Next Steps   Congratulations! You've successfully completed the Enabling LDAP Authentication in ThingWorx tutorial, and learned how to:   How to enable LDAP Authentication on ThingWorx Configuring ThingWorx to connect to an LDAP server Importing users from LDAP Auto assigning to user groups based on LDAP membership Learn More We recommend the following resources to continue your learning experience:    Capability   Guide Secure Create An Authentication Extension Secure Configure Permissions   Additional Resources If you have questions, issues, or need additional information, refer to:    Resource         Link Community Developer Community Forum Support Extension Development Guide  
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Getting Started on the ThingWorx Platform Learning Path   Learn hands-on how ThingWorx simplifies the end-to-end process of implementing IoT solutions.   NOTE: Complete the following guides in sequential order. The estimated time to complete this learning path is 210 minutes.   Get Started with ThingWorx for IoT   Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Part 5 Data Model Introduction Configure Permissions Part 1 Part 2 Build a Predictive Analytics Model  Part 1 Part 2
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Interested in learning how others using and/or hosting ThingWorx solutions can comply with various regulatory and compliance frameworks?   Based on inquiries regarding the ability of customers to meet a wide range of obligations – ranging from SOC 2 to ISO 27001 to the Department of Defense’s Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC) – the PTC's IoT Product Management and EDC teams have collaborated on a set of detailed articles explaining how to do so.   Please check out the ThingWorx Compliance Hub (support.ptc.com login required) for more information!
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We will host a live Expert Session: "Windchill & Thingworx Navigate Authentication" on November 10th at 10:30 AM EST.   Please find below the description of the expert session and the registration link .   Expert Session: Windchill & Thingworx Navigate Authentication Date and Time: Tuesday, November 10th, 2020 10:30 am EST Duration: 1 hour Host: Arshad Imam, PLM Product Technology Lead   Description: This in Expert Session will take you through a step-by-step approach for configuring authentication between Windchill and Navigate with SSL. Plus, you can take advantage of a unique opportunity to ask questions in a live Q&A following the presentation.   Register here   Existing Recorded sessions can be found on support portal using the keyword ‘Expert Sessions’.   You can also suggest topics for upcoming sessions using this small form.   Here are some recorded sessions that might be of your interest. You can find recordings for the full library of webinars using the keyword ‘Expert Sessions’ in PTC support portal search   Navigate 9.0 – What’s New? This session is the intro of a series that will cover new capabilities of the recent Navigate 9 release and the value that each can bring to your implementation. Then we will have further sessions covering the details of some of them   Recoding Link Top 5 items to check for Thingworx Performance Troubleshooting How to troubleshoot performance issues in a Thingworx Environment? Here we cover the top 5 investigation steps that will help you understand the source of your environment issues and allow better communication with PTC Technical Support   Recording Link Thingworx 9.0 Component Based App Development Following the series of new capabilities released with Navigate 9.0, this session will focus in the details of Navigate Component Based app development and how to leverage this to your use cases Recording Link Thingworx Navigate 3D Viewer Following the series of new capabilities released with Navigate 9.0, this session focus in the details of Navigate 3D Viewer leverage this to your use cases Recording Link
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  Whether your ThingWorx instances are deployed on premise, in the cloud or a hybrid of the two, I’d like you to imagine: You have a super cool app. You want to deploy it securely. You’re not a security expert. What do you do? How do you know how to securely deploy your app? Where do you go for security best practices? Introducing the new ThingWox Secure Deployment Hub!   The ThingWorx Secure Deployment Hub is a new section of our support site that will introduce you to the ThingWorx security landscape and direct you to security resources pertaining to the Edge, the platform and beyond.   From permissions and provisioning, to subsystems and SSO, the hub is packed with our recommendations and best practices for you to deploy your app in a secure fashion.   Happy deploying! Kaya
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In this post I show how to use Federation in ThingWorx to execute services on a different ThingWorx platform instance. In the use case below I set up one ThingWorx instance in the Factory and another instance in the Cloud, whereby the latter is executing a service which is actually running on the former.   Please find the document in attachment.   HTH, Alessio Marchetti  
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ThingWorx Foundation Flow Enable customers using Azure to take advantage of Azure services Access hundreds of Azure system connectors by invoking Azure Logic Apps from within ThingWorx Flow Execute Azure functions to leverage Azure dynamic, serverless scaling and pay just for processing power needed Access Azure Cognitive AI services for image recognition, text to voice/voice to text, OCR and more Easily integrate with homegrown and commercial solutions based on SQL databases where explicit APIs or REST services are not exposed Automatically trigger business process flows by subscribing to Windchill object class and instance events Provide visibility to mature PLM content (such as when a part is released) to downstream manufacturing and supply chain roles and systems Easily add new actions by extending functionality from existing connectors to create new actions to facilitate common tasks Inherit or copy functionality from existing actions and change only what is necessary to support new custom action Azure Connector SQL Database Connector Windchill Event Trigger Custom Action Improvements Platform Composer: Horizontal tab navigation is back!  Also new Scheduler editor. Security: TLS 1.2 support by default, new services for handling expired device connections New support for InFlux 1.7 and MSSQL 2017 * New* Solution Central Package, publish and upload your app with version info and metadata to your tenancy of Solution Central in the PTC cloud Identify missing dependencies via automatic dependency management to ensure your application is packaged with everything required for it to run on the target environments Garner enterprise-wide visibility of your ThingWorx apps deployed across the enterprise via a cloud portal showcasing your company’s available apps, their versions and target environments to foster a holistic view of your entire IIoT footprint across all of your servers, sites and use cases Solution Central is a brand-new cloud-based service to help enterprises package, store, deploy and manage their ThingWorx apps Accelerate your application deployment Initially targeted at developers and admins in its first release, Solution Central enables you to: Mashup Builder 9 new widgets, 5 new functions. Theme Editor with swappable Mashup Preview Responsive Layout enhancements including new settings for fixed and range sizes New Builder for custom screen sizes, new Widget and Style editors, Canvas Zoom Migration utility available for legacy applications to help move to latest features Security 3 new built-in services for WebSocket Communications Subsystem: QueryEndpointSessions, GetBoundThingsForEndpoint, and CloseEndpointSessions Provide greater awareness of Things bound to the platform Allow for mass termination of connections, if necessary Can be configured to automatically disconnect devices with expired authentication methods Encrypting data-in-motion (using TLS 1.2) is a best practice for securely using ThingWorx For previous versions, the installer defaulted to not configuring TLS; ThingWorx 8.5 and later installers will default to configuring TLS ThingWorx will still allow customers to decline to do so, if desired Device connection monitoring & security TLS by default when using installer   ThingWorx Analytics Confidence Model Training and Scoring (ThingWorx Analytics APIs) Deepens functionality by enabling training and scoring of confidence models to provide information about the uncertainty in a prediction to facilitate human and automated decision making Range Property Transform and Descriptive Service Improves ease of implementation of data transformations required for common statistical process control visualizations Architecture Simplification Improves cost of ownership by reducing the number of microservices required by Analytics Server to reduce deployment complexity Simplified installation process enables system administrators to integrate ThingWorx Analytics Server with either (or both) ThingWorx Foundation 8.5 and FactoryTalk Analytics DataFlowML 3.0.   ThingWorx Manufacturing and Service Apps & Operator Advisor Manufacturing common layer extension - now bundling all apps as one extension (Operator Advisor, Asset Advisor, Production KPIs, Controls Advisor) Operator Advisor user interface for work instruction delivery Shift and Crew data model & user interface Enhancements to Operator Advisor MPMLink connector Flexible KPI calculations Multiple context support for assets   ThingWorx Navigate New Change Management App, first in the Contribute series, allows a user to participate in change request reviews delivered through a task list called “My Tasks” BETA Release of intelligent, reusable components that will dramatically increase the speed of custom App development Improvements to existing View Apps Updated, re-usable 3D viewing component (ThingView widget) Support for Windchill Distributed Vaults Display of Security Labels & Values   ThingWorx Azure IOT Hub Connector Seamless compatibility of Azure devices with ThingWorx accelerators like Asset Advisor and custom applications developed using Mashup Builder. Ability to update software and firmware remotely using ready-built Software Content Management via “ThingWorx Azure Software Content Management” Module on Azure IoT Edge. Quick installation and configuration of ThingWorx Azure IoT Hub Connector, Azure IoT Hub and Azure IoT Edge SCM module.   Documentation ThingWorx Platform ThingWorx Platform 8.5 Release Notes ThingWorx Platform Help Center ThingWorx 8.5 Platform Reference Documents ThingWorx Connection Services Help Center   ThingWorx Azure IoT Hub Connector ThingWorx Azure IoT Hub Connector Help Center   ThingWorx Analytics ThingWorx Platform Analytics 8.5.0 Release Notes Analytics Server 8.5.1 Release Notes ThingWorx Analytics Help Center   ThingWorx Manufacturing & Service Apps and ThingWorx Operator Advisor ThingWorx Apps Help Center ThingWorx Operator Advisor Help Center   ThingWorx Navigate ThingWorx Navigate 8.5 Release Notes Installing ThingWorx Navigate 8.5 Upgrading to ThingWorx Navigate 8.5 ThingWorx Navigate 8.5 Tasks and Tailoring Customizing ThingWorx Navigate 8.5 PTC Windchill Extension Guide 1.12.x ThingWorx Navigate 8.5 Product Compatibility Matrix ThingWorx Navigate 8.5 Upgrade Support Matrix ThingWorx Navigate Help Center     Additional Information Helpcenter ThingWorx eSupport Portal ThingWorx Developer Portal PTC Marketplace The National Instruments Connector can be found on PTC Marketplace  
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This post adds to my previous post: Deploying H2 Docker versions quickly   In addition to configuring the basic Docker Images and Containers, it's also possible to deploy them with a TLS / SSL certificate and access the instances via HTTPS protocol.   For this a valid certificate is required inside a .jks keystore. I'm using a self-signed certificate, but commercial ones are even better! The certificate must be in the name of the machine which runs Docker and which is accessed by the users via browser. In my case this is "mne-docker". The password for the keystore and the private key must be the same - this is a Tomcat limitation. In my case it's super secret and "Password123456".   I have the following directory structure on my Operating System   /home/ts/docker/ certificates mne-docker.jks twx.8.2.x.h2 Dockerfile settings platform-settings.json <license_file> storage Thingworx.war   The Recipe File   In the Recipe File I make sure that I create a new Connector on port 8443, removing the old one on port 8080. I do this by just replacing via the sed command - also introducing options for content compression. I'm only replacing the first line of the xml node as it holds all the information I need to change.   Changes to the original version I posted are in green   FROM tomcat:latest MAINTAINER mneumann@ptc.com LABEL version = "8.2.0" LABEL database = "H2" RUN mkdir -p /cert RUN mkdir -p /ThingworxPlatform RUN mkdir -p /ThingworxStorage RUN mkdir -p /ThingworxBackupStorage ENV LANG=C.UTF-8 ENV JAVA_OPTS="-server -d64 -Djava.awt.headless=true -Djava.net.preferIPv4Stack=true -Dfile.encoding=UTF-8 -Duser.timezone=GMT -XX:+UseNUMA -XX:+UseG1GC -Djava.library.path=/usr/local/tomcat/webapps/Thingworx/WEB-INF/extensions RUN sed -i 's/<Connector port="8080" protocol="HTTP\/1.1"/<Connector port="8443" protocol="org.apache.coyote.http11.Http11NioProtocol" maxThreads="150" SSLEnabled="true" scheme="https" secure="true" clientAuth="false" sslProtocol="TLS" enableLookups="false" keystoreFile="\/cert\/mne-docker.jks" keystorePass="Password123456" ciphers="TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA, TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256, TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256, TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA, TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA256, TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_GCM_SHA384, TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256, TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256, TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA384, TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_GCM_SHA384, TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA, TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA" compression="on" compressableMimeType="text\/html,text\/xml,text\/plain,text\/css,text\/javascript,application\/javascript,application\/json"/g' /usr/local/tomcat/conf/server.xml COPY Thingworx.war /usr/local/tomcat/webapps VOLUME ["/ThingworxPlatform", "/ThingworxStorage", "/cert"] EXPOSE 8443   Note that I also map the /cert directory to the outside, so all of my Containers can access the same certificate. I will access it read-only.   Deploying     sudo docker build -t twx.8.2.x.h2 . sudo docker run -d --name=twx.8.2.x.h2 -p 88:8443 -v /home/ts/docker/twx.8.2.x.h2/storage:/ThingworxStorage -v /home/ts/docker/twx.8.2.x.h2/settings:/ThingworxPlatform -v /home/ts/docker/certificates:/cert:ro twx.8.2.x.h2   Mapping to the 8443 port ensures to only allow HTTPS connections. The :ro in the directory mapping ensures read-only access.   What next   Go ahead! Only secure stuff is kind of secure 😉 For more information on how to import the certificate into a the Windows Certificate Manager so browsers recognize it, see also the Trusting the Root CA chapter in Trust & Encryption - Hands On
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Saw this great question in the Developers forum https://community.ptc.com/t5/ThingWorx-Developers/Thingworx-Permission-Hierarchy/m-p/556829#M29312. Answered it there, copying it to here: Question Hi, I have a few of questions regarding the permissions model in Thingworx. I can't find any documentation that explains it clearly. Hoping someone can help, or point me in the right direction for more in depth documentation.   My understanding is that permissions can be set at a number of different levels.  Collection Level Template Level Instance Level Thing level My question is, how do these levels interact with one another. Do they all get 'AND'ed together, or do those at the lower levels supersede the ones set at higher levels. e.g.  If I set some visibility at collection level would this overridden by me setting a different visibility at say the Template instance level, or would both visibility permissions be valid. At each of level there is the ability to override (e.g. for a particular property or service). How does that fit in the hierarchy. I have read that in Thingworx 'deny' always supersedes an 'allow' permission. Is this still the case if I set deny at collection level and then at a lower level I gave 'allow' permissions would the deny take precedence. As far as I can tell 'Create' permissions can only be set at collection level. Does this mean that I am unable to restrict one set of users to create things of one template, and a different set of users to create another type of thing. Thanks in advance for any replies   Answer: Great question Thing/Entity level permissions always take precedence So if you set on Collection then on Template then on Entity it will first look at Entity then fill in with Template and Permission So if Collection says can't do Service Execute Template says Can execute Service 1 but not Service 2 Entity says Can execute Service 2 and leaves Service 1 as inherited the end result is that the user can execute service 1 and 2   In Template and Entity you can find the Override ability, that is to specifically allow or disallow the execution of a Service or read/write of a Property   What is a BEST PRACTICE? 1. Give the System user all service execute on collection level 2. Give User Groups 'blanket' permissions to Property Read/Write on ThingTemplate Level 3. Give User Groups only Override permission to execute Services on ThingTemplate Level 4. Override User Group permission to DENY property read on potential properties they are not supposed to read on the ThingTemplate Level   Generally most properties all users can access fully and the blanket permission on a ThingTemplate is fine It is very BAD to give user groups blanket permission to Service execute and should always be done by Override   Entity Hierarchy overrides the Allow Deny hierarchy, but within a single level (Collection / Template / Entity) Deny wins over Allow.   Create is indeed only set on the Collection Level, however the way to secure this is to give the System user the Create ability and create Wrapper services that use the CreateThing service which you can then secure for specific Groups. So you could create a CreateNewThingType1 and CreateNewThingType2 for example and give User Group 1 permission to Type 1 creation and User Group 2 permission to Type 2 creation.   Hope that helps.
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This is a follow-up post on my initial document about Edge Microserver (EMS) and Lua Script Resource (LSR) security. While the first part deals with fundamentals on secure configurations, this second part will give some more practical tips and tricks on how to implement these security measurements.   For more information it's also recommended to read through the Setting Up Secure Communications for WS EMS and LSR chapter in the ThingWorx Help Center. See also Trust & Encryption Theory and Hands On for more information and examples - especially around the concept of the Chain of Trust, which will be an important factor for this post as well.   In this post I will only reference the High Security options for both, the EMS and the LSR. Note that all commands and directories are Linux based - Windows equivalents might slightly differ.   Note - some of the configuration options are color coded for easy recognition: LSR resources / EMS resources   Password Encryption   It's recommended to encrypt all passwords and keys, so that they are not stored as cleartext in the config.lua / config.json files.   And of course it's also recommended, to use a more meaningful password than what I use as an example - which also means: do not use any password I mentioned here for your systems, they might too easy to guess now 🙂   The luaScriptResource script can be used for encryption:   ./luaScriptResource -encrypt "pword123" ############ Encrypted String AES:A26fBYKHJq+eMu0Fm2FlDw== ############   The wsems script can be used for encryption:   ./wsems -encrypt "pword123" ############ Encrypted String AES:A26fBYKHJq+eMu0Fm2FlDw== ############   Note that the encryption for both scripts will result in the same encrypted string. This means, either the wsems or luaScriptResource scripts can be used to retrieve the same results.   The string to encrypt can be provided with or without quotation marks. It is however recommended to quote the string, especially when the string contains blanks or spaces. Otherwise unexpected results might occur as blanks will be considered as delimiter symbols.   LSR Configuration   In the config.lua there are two sections to be configured:   scripts.script_resource which deals with the configuration of the LSR itself scripts.rap which deals with the connection to the EMS   HTTP Server Authentication   HTTP Server Authentication will require a username and password for accessing the LSR REST API.     scripts.script_resource_authenticate = true scripts.script_resource_userid = "luauser" scripts.script_resource_password = "pword123"     The password should be encrypted (see above) and the configuration should then be updated to   scripts.script_resource_password = "AES:A26fBYKHJq+eMu0Fm2FlDw=="   HTTP Server TLS Configuration   Configuration   HTTP Server TLS configuration will enable TLS and https for secure and encrypted communication channels from and to the LSR. To enable TLS and https, the following configuration is required:     scripts.script_resource_ssl = true scripts.script_resource_certificate_chain = "/pathToLSR/lsrcertificate.pem" scripts.script_resource_private_key = "/pathToLSR/key.pem" scripts.script_resource_passphrase = "keyForLSR"     It's also encouraged to not use the default certificate, but custom certificates instead. To explicitly set this, the following configuration can be added:     scripts.script_resource_use_default_certificate = false     Certificates, keys and encryption   The passphrase for the private key should be encrypted (see above) and the configuration should then be updated to     scripts.script_resource_passphrase = "AES:A+Uv/xvRWENWUzourErTZQ=="     The private_key should be available as .pem file and starts and ends with the following lines:     -----BEGIN ENCRYPTED PRIVATE KEY----- -----END ENCRYPTED PRIVATE KEY-----     As it's highly recommended to encrypt the private_key, the LSR needs to know the password for how to encrypt and use the key. This is done via the passphrase configuration. Naturally the passphrase should be encrypted in the config.lua to not allow spoofing the actual cleartext passphrase.   The certificate_chain holds the Chain of Trust of the LSR Server Certificate in a .pem file. It holds multiple entries for the the Root, Intermediate and Server Specific certificate starting and ending with the following line for each individual certificate and Certificate Authority (CA):     -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE----- -----END CERTIFICATE-----     After configuring TLS and https, the LSR REST API has to be called via https://lsrserver:8001 (instead of http).   Connection to the EMS   Authentication   To secure the connection to the EMS, the LSR must know the certificates and authentication details for the EMS:     scripts.rap_server_authenticate = true scripts.rap_userid = "emsuser" scripts.rap_password = "AES:A26fBYKHJq+eMu0Fm2FlDw=="     Supply the authentication credentials as defined in the EMS's config.json - as for any other configuration the password can be used in cleartext or encrypted. It's recommended to encrypt it here as well.   HTTPS and TLS   Use the following configuration establish the https connection and using certificates     scripts.rap_ssl = true scripts.rap_cert_file = "/pathToLSR/emscertificate.pem" scripts.rap_deny_selfsigned = true scripts.rap_validate = true     This forces the certificate to be validated and also denies selfsigned certificates. In case selfsigned certificates are used, you might want to adjust above values.   The cert_file is the full Chain of Trust as configured in the EMS' config.json http_server.certificate options. It needs to match exactly, so that the LSR can actually verify and trust the connections from and to the EMS.   EMS Configuration   In the config.lua there are two sections to be configured:   http_server which enables the HTTP Server capabilities for the EMS certificates which holds all certificates that the EMS must verify in order to communicate with other servers (ThingWorx Platform, LSR)   HTTP Server Authentication and TLS Configuration   HTTP Server Authentication will require a username and password for accessing the EMS REST API. HTTP Server TLS configuration will enable TLS and https for secure and encrypted communication channels from and to the EMS.   To enable both the following configuration can be used:   "http_server": { "host": "<emsHostName>", "port": 8000, "ssl": true, "certificate": "/pathToEMS/emscertificate.pem", "private_key": "/pathToEMS/key.pem", "passphrase": "keyForEMS", "authenticate": true, "user": "emsuser", "password": "pword123" }   The passphrase as well as the password should be encrypted (see above) and the configuration should then be updated to   "passphrase": "AES:D6sgxAEwWWdD5ZCcDwq4eg==", "password": "AES:A26fBYKHJq+eMu0Fm2FlDw=="   See LSR configuration for comments on the certificate and the private_key. The same principals apply here. Note that the certificate must hold the full Chain of Trust in a .pem file for the server hosting the EMS.   After configuring TLS and https, the EMS REST API has to be called via https://emsserver:8000 (instead of http).   Certificates Configuration   The certificates configuration hold all certificates that the EMS will need to validate. If ThingWorx is configured for HTTPS and the ws_connection.encryption is set to "ssl" the Chain of Trust for the ThingWorx Platform Server Certificate must be present in the .pem file. If the LSR is configured for HTTPS the Chain of Trust for the LSR Server Certificate must be present in the .pem file.   "certificates": { "validate": true, "allow_self_signed": false, "cert_chain" : "/pathToEMS/listOfCertificates.pem" } The listOfCertificates.pem is basicially a copy of the lsrcertificate.pem with the added ThingWorx certificates and CAs.   Note that all certificates to be validated as well as their full Chain of Trust must be present in this one .pem file. Multiple files cannot be configured.   Binding to the LSR   When binding to the LSR via the auto_bind configuration, the following settings must be configured:   "auto_bind": [{ "name": "<ThingName>", "host": "<lsrHostName>", "port": 8001, "protocol": "https", "user": "luauser", "password": "AES:A26fBYKHJq+eMu0Fm2FlDw==" }]   This will ensure that the EMS connects to the LSR via https and proper authentication.   Tips   Do not use quotation marks (") as part of the strings to be encrypted. This could result in unexpected behavior when running the encryption script. Do not use a semicolon (:) as part of any username. Authentication tokens are passed from browsers as "username:password" and a semicolon in a username could result in unexpected authentication behavior leading to failed authentication requests. In the Server Specific certificates, the CN must match the actual server name and also must match the name of the http_server.host (EMS) or script_resource_host (LSR) In the .pem files first store Server Specific certificates, then all required Intermediate CAs and finally all required Root CAs - any other order could affect the consistency of the files and the certificate might not be fully readable by the scripts and processes. If the EMS is configured with certifcates, the LSR must connect via a secure channel as well and needs to be configured to do so. If the LSR is configured with certifcates, the EMS must connect via a secure channel as well and needs to be configured to do so. For testing REST API calls with resources that require encryptions and authentcation, see also How to run REST API calls with Postman on the Edge Microserver (EMS) and Lua Script Resource (LSR)   Export PEM data from KeyStore Explorer   To generate a .pem file I usually use the KeyStore Explorer for Windows - in which I have created my certificates and manage my keystores. In the keystore, select a certificate and view its details Each certificate and CA in the chain can be viewed: Root, Intermediate and Server Specific Select each certificate and CA and use the "PEM" button on the bottom of the interface to view the actual PEM content Copy to clipboard and paste into .pem file To generate a .pem file for the private key, Right-click the certificate > Export > Export Private Key Choose "PKCS #8" Check "Encrypted" and use the default algorithm; define an "Encryption Password"; check the "PEM" checkbox and export it as .pkcs8 file The .pkcs8 file can then be renamed and used as .pem file The password set during the export process will be the scripts.script_resource_passphrase (LSR) or the http_server.passphrase (EMS) After generating the .pem files I copy them over to my Linux systems where they will need 644 permissions (-rw-r--r--)
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The Squeal functionality has been discontinued with ThingWorx 8.1, see ThingWorx 8.1.0 Release Notes   There might be scenarios where it should be disabled in earlier versions as well. This can be achieved e.g. with Tomcat Security Constraints. To add such a constraint, open <Tomcat>\webapps\Thingworx\WEB-INF\web.xml At the end of the file add a new constraint just before closing the </web-app> tag:   <security-constraint> <web-resource-collection> <web-resource-name>Forbidden</web-resource-name> <url-pattern>/Squeal/*</url-pattern> </web-resource-collection> <auth-constraint/> <user-data-constraint> <transport-guarantee>CONFIDENTIAL</transport-guarantee> </user-data-constraint> </security-constraint> Save the file and restart Tomcat. Accessing the /Thingworx/Squeal resource now will result in an error message:   HTTP Status 403 - Access to the requested resource has been denied   One scenario to be aware of is when the web.xml changes, e.g. due to updating ThingWorx or other manual changes. In such a case, ensure that the filter is still present in the file and taken into account.
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Connectors allow clients to establish a connection to Tomcat via the HTTP / HTTPS protocol. Tomcat allows for configuring multiple connectors so that users or devices can either connect via HTTP or HTTPS.   Usually users like you and me access websites by just typing the URL in the browser's address bar, e.g. "www.google.com". By default browsers assume that the connection should be established with the HTTP protocol. For HTTPS connections, the protocol has to be specified explictily, e.g. "https://www.google.com"   However - Google automatically forwards HTTP connections automatically as a HTTPS connection, so that all connections are using certificates and are via a secure channel and you will end up on "https://www.google.com" anyway.   To configure ThingWorx to only allow secure connections there are two options...   1) Remove HTTP access   If HTTP access is removed, users can no longer connect to the 80 or 8080 port. ThingWorx will only be accessible on port 443 (or 8443).   If connecting to port 8080 clients will not be redirected. The redirectPort in the Connector is only forwarding requests internally in Tomcat, not switching protocols and ports and not requiring a certificate when being used. The redirected port does not reflect in the client's connection but only manages internal port-forwarding in Tomcat.   By removing the HTTP ports for access any connection on port 80 (or 8080) will end up in an error message that the client cannot connect on this port.   To remove the HTTP ports, edit the <Tomcat>\conf\server.xml and comment out sections like       <!-- commented out to disallow connections on port 80 <Connector port="80" protocol="org.apache.coyote.http11.Http11NioProtocol" connectionTimeout="20000" redirectPort="443" /> -->     Save and restart Tomcat. If opening Tomcat (and ThingWorx) in a browser via http://myServer/ the connection will fail with a "This site can’t be reached", "ERR_CONNECTION_REFUSED" error.   2) Forcing insecure connections through secure ports   Alternatively, port 80 and 8080 can be kept open to still allow users and devices to connect. But instead of only internally forwarding the port, Tomcat can be setup to also forward the client to the new secure port. With this, users and devices can still use e.g. old bookmarks and do not have to explicitly set the HTTPS protocol in the address.   To configure this, edit the <Tomcat>\conf\web.xml and add the following section just before the closing </web-app> tag at the end of the file:     <security-constraint>        <web-resource-collection>              <web-resource-name>HTTPSOnly</web-resource-name>              <url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>        </web-resource-collection>        <user-data-constraint>              <transport-guarantee>CONFIDENTIAL</transport-guarantee>        </user-data-constraint> </security-constraint>     In <Tomcat>\conf\web.xml ensure that all HTTP Connectors (port 80 and 8080) have their redirect port set to the secure HTTPS Connector (usually port 443 or port 8443).   Save and restart Tomcat. If opening Tomcat (and ThingWorx) in a browser via http://myServer/ the connection will now be forwarded to the secure port. The browser will now show the connection as https://myServer/ instead and connections are secure and using certificates.   What next?   Configuring Tomcat to force insecure connection to actually secure HTTPS connection just requires a simple configuration change. If you want to read more about certificates, encryption and how to setup ThingWorx for HTTPS in the first place, be sure to also have a look at   Trust & Encryption - Theory Trust & Encryption - Hands On
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What is Meltdown and Spectre? Windows KB Page Blog on Altaro containing  some performance tests with pre/post-patch machines https://www.altaro.com/hyper-v/meltdown-spectre-hyperv-performance/ For any further information about PTC’s reaction to the Meltdown&Spectre, please reference this link:  https://www.ptc.com/en/support/article?n=CS277711
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This expert session focuses on overviewing the patch and upgrade process of the Thingworx platform. It provides information on how to perform a patch upgrade for the platform as well as extensions upgrade, and when an in-place upgrade is applicable. It can be viewed as a quick reference note for upgrading your system.     For full-sized viewing, click on the YouTube link in the player controls.   Visit the Online Success Guide to access our Expert Session videos at any time as well as additional information about ThingWorx training and services.
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Configuring Navigate search using Common Tailoring and configuring access permission on apps from role perspective.     For full-sized viewing, click on the YouTube link in the player controls.   Visit the Online Success Guide to access our Expert Session videos at any time as well as additional information about ThingWorx training and services.
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