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Community Tip - Learn all about the Community Ranking System, a fun gamification element of the PTC Community. X

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Note: The following tutorial are based on a Thingworx/CWC 9.5. Steps and names may differ in another version. Context As a human reaction, the tracked time displayed may be misperceived by the Operator. It can lead to a reject of the solution. CWC doesn’t have (yet?) the capability to configure the visibility to hide the timer. The purpose of this tutorial is to create a quick and straight to the point customization to hide the timer in the execution screen. All other features, services and interfaces are left untouched.   As a big picture, here are the 6 modifications you will need to do: Modify the 4 mashups Modify 2 values in 2 tables of the MSSQL database   Status The mashup containing the timer is PTC.FSU.CWC.Execution.Overview_MU. It is easy to duplicate it and hide the timer widget (switch the visible property to false). But now, how to set it in the standard interface? In order to do it, you need to duplicate the mashups linked to the Execution.Overview_MU mashup. PTC.FSU.CWC.Execution.Overview_MU is directly referenced by the following entities: PTC.FSU.CWC.Authoring.Preview_MU PTC.FSU.CWC.Execution.WorkInstructionStart_MU PTC.FSU.CWC.GIobalUI.ApplicationSpecificHeader_HD PTC.FSU.CWC.WorkDefinitionExecution.StationSelectionContainer_EP   Customization Duplicate all those mashups except Authoring.Preview_MU because we will focus only on the authoring side of CWC. Hereafter it will be called the same as the original + _DUPLICATE. Perform the following modifications.   Open PTC.FSU.CWC.GlobalUI.ApplicationSpecificHeader_HD_DUPLICATE, then in Functions: open the expression named NavigateToStationSelection. Change the name of the mashup to the relevant one, example: PTC.FSU.CWC.WorkDefinitionExecution.StationSelectionContainer_EP_DUPLICATE open the validator named ShowRaiseHand. Change the name of the 2 mashups to the relevant ones, example: PTC.FSU.CWC.Execution.WorkInstructionStart_MU_DUPLICATE and PTC.FSU.CWC.Execution.Overview_MU_DUPLICATE open the validator named ShowStationSelection. Change the name of the 2 mashups to the relevant ones, example: PTC.FSU.CWC.Execution.WorkInstructionStart_MU_DUPLICATE   Open PTC.FSU.CWC.Execution.Overview_DUPLICATE, then in Functions: open the expression named SetMashupToWorkInstructionStart. Change the name of the mashup to the relevant one, example: PTC.FSU.CWC.Execution.WorkInstructionStart_MU_DUPLICATE open the expression named SetMashupToStationSelection. Change the name of the mashup to the relevant one, example: PTC.FSU.CWC.WorkDefinitionExecution.StationSelectionContainer_EP_DUPLICATE   Open PTC.FSU.CWC.Execution.WorkInstructionStart_MU_DUPLICATE, then in Functions: open the expression named NavigateToStart. Change the name of the mashup to the relevant one, example: PTC.FSU.CWC.Execution.Overview_MU_DUPLICATE open the expression named NavigateToStationSelection. Change the name of the mashup to the relevant one, example: PTC.FSU.CWC.WorkDefinitionExecution.StationSelectionContainer_EP_DUPLICATE   Open PTC.FSU.CWC.WorkDefinitionExecution.StationSelectionContainer_EP_DUPLICATE, in functions: open the expression named NavigateToStart. Change the name of the mashup to the relevant one, example: PTC.FSU.CWC.Execution.Overview_MU_DUPLICATE open the expression named NavigateToWorkInstructionStart. Change the name of the mashup to the relevant one, example: PTC.FSU.CWC.Execution.WorkInstructionStart_MU_DUPLICATE   Now, let’s change the database value. In MSSQL, navigate to the thingworxapps database, and edit the dbo.menu table. Look the line for AssemblyExecution (by default line 22) and look the value in column targetmashuplink. Switch the original value PTC.FSU.CWC.WorkDefinitionExecution.StationSelectionContainer_EP to the name of the duplication of this mashup. Lastly, edit the dbo.menucontext table. Look the line related to CWC (application UID = 5) and look the value in column targetmashuplink. Switch the original value PTC.FSU.CWC.GlobalUI.ApplicationSpecificHeader_HD to the name of the duplication of this mashup.   Result After this modification, you can start and check an operation. You should see the following result:
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  Use the Collection Widget to organize visual elements of your application.   GUIDE CONCEPT   This project will introduce the Collection Widget.   Following the steps in this guide, you will learn to display different values from a single dataset in real-time.   We will teach you how to utilize the Collection Widget to generate a series of repeated Mashups for every row of data in a table.     YOU'LL LEARN HOW TO   Create a Datashape to define columns of a table Create a Thing with an Infotable Property Create a base Mashup to display data Utilize a Collection Widget to display data from multiple rows of a table   NOTE: This guide's content aligns with ThingWorx 9.3. The estimated time to complete ALL 3 parts of this guide is 60 minutes.      Step 1: Create a Datashape    Create a Datashape   The Collection Widget uses a Service to dynamically define visual content.   The data must be in a tabular format (for example: Data Table, Info Table, or external Database-connection) in order for the Collection Widget to access it.   In this part of the lesson, we'll create a Data Shape to define the columns of the table.   In a subsequent step, we'll create an Info Table Property within a Thing in order to store the information.   In the ThingWorx Composer Browse tab, click Modeling > Data Shapes, + New              2.  In the Name field, enter cwht_datashape.                      3. If Project is not already set, search for and select PTCDefaultProject.         4. At the top, click Field Definitions          First Definition:          1. Click + Add to open the New Field Definition slide-out.          2. In the Name field, enter first_number.          3. Change the Base Type to NUMBER.          4. Check the Is Primary Key box. All Datashapes must have a single Primary Key, and the first Field is as acceptable as any other for our purposes here.                5. At the top-right, click the "Check with a +" button for Done and Add.   Second Definition:   In the Name field, enter second_number.       2. Change the Base Type to NUMBER.               3. At the top-right, click the "Check with a +" button for Done and Add.     Third Definition:   In the Name field, enter third_number.         2. Change the Base Type to NUMBER.               3. At the top-right, click the "Check" button for Done         4. At the top, click Save.                   Step 2: Create a Thing   Create a Thing   In the previous step, we created a Data Shape to define the Info Table Property columns.   Now, we will create a Thing, add an Info Table Property, format the Info Table Property with the Data Shape, and set some default values.   On the ThingWorx Composer Browse tab, click Modeling > Things, + New.           2. In the Name field, enter cwht_thing.         3. If Project is not already set, search for and select PTCDefaultProject.         4. Select GenericThing in the Base Thing Template field       Add InfoTable Property         1. At the top, click Properties and Alerts.        2. Click the + Add button to open the New Property slide-out.        3. In the Name field, enter infotable_property.        4. Change the Base Type to INFOTABLE.        5. In the Data Shape field, select cwht_datashape.        6. Check the Persistent checkbox.       First Default   Check the Has Default Value checkbox. A cwht_datashape icon will appear underneath.            2. Under Has Default Value, click the cwht_datashape button to open the pop-up menu which  sets the default values               3. Click the + Add icon.         4. Enter values in each number field, such as 1, 2, and 3.              5. At the bottom-right, click the green Add button.     Second Default   Click the + Add icon.         2. Enter values in each number field, such as 10, 20, and 30            3. At the bottom-right, click the green Add button       Third Default   Click the + Add icon.       2. Enter values in each number field, such as 100, 200, and 300            3. At the bottom-right, click the greenAddbutton           4.  At the bottom-right, click Save to close the pop-up menu               5. At the top-right, click the "Check" button for Done.       6. At the top, click Save          Click here to view Part 2 of this guide.
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    Step 5: Collection Widget   A Collection widget is used to display information from a collection of Things. Similar to a Grid Widget, the Collection widget gives you complete control over how data is displayed by binding data to an embedded static Mashup.   In the first part of this step we will create a static Mashup with Parameters bound to its widgets. Next, we will configure a Collection widget to use the static Mashup we create. In the next step we will customize the Collection styling.   Create Static Mashup   Click the Browse tab on the far left of Composer, in the Visualizations section, click Mashups . Click + New to create a Mashup. Select Static Mashup, then click OK.   Name your Mashup TractorListFormat If Project is not already set, click the + in the Project text box and select the PTCDefaultProject. Click Save. Click the Design tab If Project is not already set, click the + in the Project text box and select the PTCDefaultProject. In the Layout tab, under Container > Positioning, Click Static, then scroll to Container Size, and click Fixed Size NOTE: A Static Mashup maintains fixed widget sizes and spacing, as opposed to a Responsive Mashup that will dynamically change widget sizes and spacing to use the available window area. Click the Width property and set it to 200 and the Height property to 60   In the lower left panel, click the Style tab and click the X to remove the default Style. Click the + icon, then select DefaultImageBorderStyle to remove all styling. NOTE: The default Mashup styling is removed so it will not override the sidebar and parent Mashup styling. Scroll to the Width property and set it to 200 and the Height property to 60 Click the Widgets tab and type label in the filter text box. Drag and drop two Label Widgets onto the upper left of your static Mashup.   Add Parameters to Mashup Select the Explorer tab then select the top level Mashup Click Configure Mashup Parameters from the drop-down menu in the upper left of the Mashup canvas.   Click the Add Parameter button. Type firstLine in the Name field and select a Base Type of STRING. Click Add Parameter again and name this parameter secondLine also with a Base Type STRING.   Click Done to return to Mashup Builder.   Bind Parameters to Widgets   Click the drop-down in the upper left of the Mashup canvas, then select Configure Bindings Click firstLine from the Properties list on the left. Clicking the drop-down arrow and click Add Source to display the Mashup entities that can be bound to the Mashup parameter named firstLine.   Select the checkbox next to the top LabelText property.   Click Done to return to the Configure Bindings pop-up. Click secondLine, then Binding Targets, and select the checkbox next to the bottom Label Text property, then click Done Click Done to close Configure Bindings pop-up and return to Mashup builder. NOTE: The Mashup parameters and bindings are displayed in the Connections panel at the bottom. Click Save before continuing to the next step.   Bind Data to Collection   Return to the main Mashup then drag and drop a Collection widget onto the top area of the left side bar. In the Collection Properties panel, set the View property to Table Scroll to the Mashup property, click the wand icon and browse to the name of the static Mashup created above. Drag the All Data source from the data panel on the right onto the Collection widget, then click Data in the Select Binding Target pop-up.   Set UIDField property and SortField to SerialNumber.   Drag the All Data source from the data panel on the right onto the Collection widget, then click Data in the Select Binding Target pop-up.   In the Collection Properties panel, scroll to MashupPropertyBinding and click *Add Enter the text below, then click Done: { "SerialNumber": "firstLine", "ModelNumber": "secondLine" } NOTE: This JSON property binds the SerialNumber and ModelNumber properties in the data source to the the firstLine and secondLine parameters in the embedded mashup   9. Save the Mashup and click View Mashup.   10. Test the Mashup and you will see the navigation panel on the left is showing data and is linked to the Google Map widget in the center.       Step 6: Customize Collection   The Collection uses default styling and no images. In this part of the exercise, we will replace the blue bar that indicates the selected row with a custom icon and modify the default styles so that the left panel's background color is shown.   Right-click on each of the images below to download and save them for use in the next step.     We will upload these images to create new Media entities and apply them to the Repeater widget.   Select the Browse folder icon on the far left of Composer, in the Visualization section click Media Click the + New to create a new Media entity and enter a name for the un-selected tractor image. Click Change in the Image section, then browse to the saved image. Click Open, then Save. Repeat these steps to create a Media entity for a selected tractor Open the static TractorListFormat mashup that controls the Collection widget formating Click and drag an Image widget onto the mashup In the lower left panel, in the SourceURL property, click the wand icon to select the unselected tractor image. Change both the Width and Height properties to 50 pressing Tab after each entry to record them.   Click the Explorer tab in the top left, click the top-most Mashup entity, then click the Style Properties tab Cick the X in the Style property and select DefaultImageBorderStyle to remove all styling, then click Save Click the More drop-down at the top of Composer and click Duplicate   Enter TractorListSelectFormat for the name and click Save then click the Design tab Click on the tractor image, then, the lower left, click the wand icon in the SourceURL property and select the selected tractor image and Click Save   Open your original Mashup and click on the Collection widget in the Mashuo Builder canvas. Scroll to the SelectedMashupName Property and click the + to select TractorListSelecteFormat.   Click Save for the Mashup, then View Mashup to see your Mashup with customized icons.   The default black text on green is a little hard to read. The steps below will change the text colors to make the data more readable. Open the TractorListSelectFormat Mashup then click on the top Label widget to change the color of the text. Click the Style Properties tab and expand Base and Label In color property select yellow and select Bold in the font-weight property before clicking Save. Select the other Label widget and assign a light grey color for the color then save the embedded Mashup. Reload the runtime view of the Mashup to see the results.     Step 7: Detail Panel   The right sidebar has a simple Image of a tractor along with product-specific information shown in Gauges and Value Displays.   The right sidebar contains two tabs in a Tabs - Responsive widget. The tabs are used to selectively hide and display groups of functions and data. The orange button labeled "View Vehicle Specs" is a Navigation widget that opens a pop-up window with other detailed product information. The colored range indications on the right Gauge were created by configuring the gauges ValueFormatter property to use State Formatting.   Add Tab Widget   Open the original, main Mashup and enter tab in the Widget panel search field. Drag and drop a Tabs widget onto the Right Sidebar.   Scroll to the Tab1Name property and enter Tractor Details. NOTE: This guide only covers configuring one of the two tabs added to the Mashup. Using the skills you've practiced thus far, feel free to add additional information to the tabs on your Mashup. Uncheck the RoundedCorners property. Click the Layout tab and click the radio button under Container > Orientation > Vertical   Add ValueDisplay Widgets   Type value in the Widget search box then click and drag a Value Display Widget onto Tab 1. In the Property panel, scroll to the Label property and enter Serial Number In the Data panel, expand Selected Row(s) then drag the SerialNumber property onto the Value Display widget and click Data when the Select Binding Target pop-up is displayed.   Drag another Value Display Widget onto the tab widget below to the first one and enter Name for the Label property. Drag name from the Selected Row(s) onto the second Value Display and then click Data. NOTE: Be sure to select data sources under Selected Row(s) so that data displayed will correspond to the tractor selected from either the map or the left side menu. Save the Mashup then click View Mashup to see all three panels working together to show data.   Add Gauges   Enter gauge in the Widget search box then click and drag a Gauge Widget onto Tab 1. In the Properties panel, enter 3000 for the MaxValue property and RPM in the Legend property. In the Data panel, expand Selected Row(s) then drag CurrentRPM onto the Gauge widget and click Data when the Select Binding Target pop-up is displayed. Drag another Gauge widget onto the canvas next to the first one and enter MPH for the Legend property. Drag CurrentSpeed from the Selected Row(s) onto the second Gauge, then click Data.   Click here to view Part 3 of this guide.
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  Discover how ThingWorx advance tree grids and grids can be implemented in a compelling Mashup design.   Guide Concept   This project will introduce how to create complex user interfaces that are built by using Mashup grids and JavaScript services.   Following the steps in this guide, you will build a web application with advanced data displays. We will teach you how to create a professional user interface that effectively conveys information to users.   You'll learn how to   Create dynamic tree grids to display hierarchy. Create dynamic grids to display growing data number of data points.   NOTE: This guide's content aligns with ThingWorx 9.3. The estimated time to complete this guide is 30 minutes       Step 1: What Are Dynamic Grids   In the Mashup Builder, we utilize Functions to create added capabilities in our Mashups. Whether we are navigating to another Mashup or triggering events based on some action. Functions are your best friends when creating more advanced Mashups.   Function  Description   Auto Refresh  Refreshes data automatically for widgets in a mashup.  Confirmation  Displays a confirmation dialog box.  Events Router  Routes multiple input sources to one output of the same type.  Expression  Evaluates JavaScript expressions.  Logout  Ends the current user session and redirects to a mashup or a Web page.  Navigation  Navigates from one mashup to another.  Status Message  Displays information, error, or warning messages in a mashup.  Validator  Validates data from input parameters by using JavaScript expressions.   In the next sections, we will cover some of these Functions and showcase how to add them to your Mashups.     Step 2: Create A Dynamic Grid   Let's start things off by creating a simple Expression Function. This Expression will show or hide a label based on whether a checkbox is checked or not. This simple expression can be expanded to your use case.   It is VERY important to note that in an Expression Function (and also found in Services and Validation Functions) the output of the Function will be the result variable. Let's create our Mashup, then go over what is involved in an Expression.   In the ThingWorx Composer, click the + New at the top of the screen.   Select Mashup in the dropdown.   Select the Responsive layout then hit OK.   Set the Name to  MyFunctionsMashup. For the Project, click the + button and select PTCDefaultProject.    Under Project, click the blue Set as project context option. This will stop us from having to set the Project on every Thing we create. It should now match the following.    Click Save. Click on the Design tab at the top. This Mashup will be where we create the Majority of our Functions and capabilities. Let's start adding to our Mashup.   Click the Layout tab. Scroll down and set the Orientation to Horizontal.   Click on the Widgets tab. Type in the Filter text box for Checkbox.   Drag and drop a Checkbox Widget to the Mashup Canvas. This Checkbox will dictate whether what we show for the coming Labels and Textbox. Type in the Filter text box for Button. This Button will dictate the event that triggers our Functions. Drag and drop a Button Widget to the Mashup Canvas.   Type in the Filter text box for Label. Drag and drop TWO (2) Label Widgets to the Mashup Canvas. We will only show one Label at a time and I'll show you how.   Type in the Filter text box for Text Field. Drag and drop a Text Field Widget to the Mashup Canvas.       We have the Widgets we need to show our Expression example. Let's start with connecting the Widgets to Functions.   Click the + button in the Functions section in the bottom right.    In the New Function popup, select Expression. Set the Name of the new Expression to isCheckboxChecked.   Click Next. In the new screen, click Add Parameter. Set the Name to this new parameter as checked. Set the Base Type as BOOLEAN.   Switch the Data Change Type to ALWAYS. Switch Output Base Type to BOOLEAN.   Add the following code to the Expression area.  if(checked) { result = true; } else { result = false; }   11. Click Done.   You've now created your first expression. This expression is an example of how easy it can be done. Let's add three three additional Expressions to have some fun.   Repeat steps 1-11 in the last section for TWO (2) new Expressions. Name these Expressions setFirstLabelVisbility and setSecondLabelVisbility. You should now have three total. Repeat steps 1-8 in the last section for ONE (1) new Expression. Name this Expression setTextFieldText. We should have a Parameter called checked. Click Add Parameter again to add a Parameter named input. This fourth Expression should match the following thus far:     Switch Output Base Type to STRING. Add the following code to the Expression area:  if(checked) {     if(input && input.indexOf("YES") >= 0) {     result = input + ", YES";     } else {         result = "YES";     } } else {     result = "NO";     } 6. Click Done.   This expression will see whether or not the Checkbox is checked, then output a string of YES or a simple NO. Let's setup our connections between Widgets and Expressions.   Ensure Expressions are visible and match the following.   Click on the Checkbox in the Mashup Canvas. Click the dropdown that appears.   Drag and drop the State Property to the checked Parameter of all FOUR (4) of the Expressions.   Your bindings should match the following after you're done with setting all four.   Expand the setFirstLabelVisibility Expression (if not already expanded).   Drag the Output to the first Label and select Visible.   Expand the setSecondLabelVisibility Expression (if not already expanded).   Drag the Output to the second Label and select Visible.   Our labels are configured. Now let's setup our Text Field Widget.    Expand the setTextFieldText Expression (if not already expanded). Drag the Output to the Text Field and select Text.   Select the Button Widget in the Mashup Canvas.  Click the dropdown for the Button Widget. Drag and drop the Clicked Event to all FOUR (4) of the Expressions.   Your Button Widget should look like the following:   Select the Text Field Widget in the Mashup Canvas Click the dropdown for the Text Field Widget. Drag and drop the Text Property to the input Parameter of the setTextFieldText Expression. Click Save. Click View Mashup. Play around and see all the work you've done.   You maybe notice that both Label Widgets show or hide at the same time. To split when they will show or hide, update the code for one of the Label visibility Expressions to the following:    if(checked) {     result = false; } else {     result = true;     }   Click here to view Part 2 of this guide.  
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    Modernize your Mashups with CSS to enhance the presentation of your application.   GUIDE CONCEPT   This project will introduce using CSS to create a customized, consistent look and feel for your IoT application.   Following the steps in this guide, you will create a custom CSS class definitions and bind these classes to Mashup features.   We will teach you how to present a professional-looking user interface and ensure consistency of style treatments within your application by implementing Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) in Mashups.     You'll learn how to   Create custom CSS classes using the integrated CSS editor Bind CSS classes to a Mashup and to individual Widgets Use Media queries to dynamically apply styling     Step 1: Custom CSS Benefits   You now have more flexibility to customize your application’s UI and improve the user experience using industry-standard web techniques. You can implement CSS in ThingWorx to control the visualization of your Mashup.   Feature                   Benefit Text Treatments Optimize text with shadow, color, font, and border Responsive UI Customize layout based on user actions and the data being displayed Media Queries Accommodate many screen sizes with flexboxes and other standard containers Animations Implement standard CSS key frames Customizations Modify application appearance without changing source Mashup Linting Expedite development with code auto-completion and design-time syntax warnings       Step 2: Access Sample Files   We created sample entities you can use to complete the steps in this guide. Download the attached Mashups_CustomCssTutorialMashup.xml From the Home page of Composer, click the Import/Export icon, then choose Import   Keep the default options and click Browse. Locate and select the CustomCssTutorialMashup.xml file you downloaded and extracted, click Open then Import.   Click Close after the Import successful message is displayed. Click the Browse tab in the left navigation panel, then click Mashups.                     6. Select the CustomCssTutorialMashup.                 7. Click View Mashup to view the Mashup.     NOTE: This is a simple Mashup designed to demonstrate how the UI changes when CSS is applied.       Step 3: Create CSS Rule Block   In this step, you will use the built-in editor to create a custom CSS class that will be used in the next step to modify the appearance of three buttons grouped by the Fieldset Widget.   Open the CustomCssTutorialMashup in Edit and Design view.     Click Custom CSS.     Copy the CSS class below and paste it into the Custom CSS editor: .myMashupClass .widget-fieldset .widget-ptcsbutton { box-shadow: 5px 5px 5px #888888; } NOTE: This class will create a shadow around all of the buttons that are in a Fieldset container  only after it is bound to a Mashup,   4. Click Save.     Tips   Press Ctrl -> Space to use the Auto-complete feature and see code snippets, which can expedite your development time.     The Linting feature will warn you if there are errors in your code, so you can fix them at design time.       Step 4: Apply Custom Class to Mashup   In this step we will demonstrate how to modify the look and feel of a Mashup without changing the Mashup itself. The myMashupClass we just created chains two selectors: the widget-fieldset and the widget-button. Only Widgets that are in both selector categories will be modified.   Click Design and select the Explorer tab, then select the top-level Mashup.     In the property panel in the lower left, locate the CustomClass property and type myMashupClass as the value. Press Tab to save the value change.     WARNING: You must press Tab after every property change in order for the new value to be saved.   4. Click Save then View Mashup to see that the buttons in the Field Set have shadow borders.       Step 5: Apply Custom Class to Widget   In addition to the Mashup level, you can apply style treatments directly to a Widget in your Mashup. In ThingWorx, the following Widgets have a CustomClass property you can modify:     For this example, we will make the text on one of the buttons all caps.   In the CustomCssTutorialMashup, click Custom CSS. Add the following css code: .myButtonClass .widget-ptcsbutton { text-transform: uppercase; }     Return to the Design view, and In the Explorer tab, click the button-3.     In the Property panel, enter myMashupClass to the CustomClass field, then press tab     Save then View Mashup the Mashup to see that the button text is now all caps.       Step 6: Bind Custom Class   The UI of a Mashup can be dynamically updated at runtime by binding the value of the CustomClass property to a dynamic data source such as: Services Mashup parameters Widgets (expression widgets for example)   In this portion of the guide, we will demonstrate modifying a Mashup in response to user actions:   Return to the Design view for the CustomCssTutorialMashup. In the Mashup Builder, click the Functions tab in the lower right, then expand Event Routers and expand eventsrouter-6     Click Output property and drag it onto the bottom button of the group of three buttons.     Select the CustomClass property from the pop-up to bind it to Button-4   In Mashup Builder click Custom CSS tab. Add the following css code: .myBoundButtonClass1 .widget-ptcsbutton { text-transform: lowercase; } .myBoundButtonClass2 .widget-ptcsbutton { text-transform: uppercase; }           7. Click Save and then View Mashup.           8. Click on each of the Apply buttons to see the results of a CSS class applied to in response to user actions.     Step 7: Use Media Queries   You can use Media queries to apply styling based on the characteristics of the device being used to access the application. For this example, we will use a CSS Class to hide three elements when the browser’s width is less than 600 pixels wide.   1. Open the CustomCssTutorialMashup in Edit and Design view, then click Custom CSS.     2. Copy the CSS class below and use the Custom CSS editor to add it to the top of the existing  CSS, then click Save. @media screen and (max-width: 1000px) { #root_ptcslabel-10-bounding-box { visibility: hidden; } #root_ptcstextfield-7-bounding-box{ visibility: hidden; } #root_ptcstextfield-12-bounding-box { visibility: hidden; } }   NOTE: The ID selector in your CSS must add root_ to the beginning, and -bounding-box to the end of the element’s ID shown in Mashup Builder.   3. Click View Mashup, then click and drag the edge of the browser window to reduce the width below 600 pixels.     NOTE: The three Widgets selected in the media class added in the last step will disappear as soon as the browser is less than 600 pixels wide.       Click here to view Part 2 of this guide.
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  Step 3: Create a Base Mashup   Now that you have some data, you need to create and configure a Mashup to display the data.   Using Mashup Parameters, the Collection Widget will replicate the base Mashup multiple times, correlating to each row of data in the Info Table Property.   On the ThingWorx Composer Browse tab, click Visualization > Mashups, + New                2. Keep the default ofResponsive(without selecting any Templates), and click OK          3. In the Name field, enter cwht_base_mashup.      4. If Project is not already set, search for and select PTCDefaultProject.      5. Click Save.     Add Widgets to Design   At the top, click Design. TIP: You can click the left arrow on the divider between the Browse left-navigation and the Mashup Builder to minimize the navigation and provide more room for the Mashup Builder itself.                  2.  On the Layout tab at the top-left, select Positioning > Static. You generally want the base Mashup to be "Static" so that you know the size of the cells which  the Collection Widget will replicate.                3. From the top-left Widgets tab, drag-and-drop a Gauge Widget onto the central Canvas area.             4. Drag-and-drop an LED Display Widget onto the central Canvas area.               5. Drag-and-drop a Text Field Widget onto the central Canvas area       Reduce the Mashup Size   At the top-left on the Explorer tab, select the Container.                2. In the central Canvas area, click-and-drag the far-right side of the container to reduce its horizontal size               3. Click-and-drag the bottom of the container to reduce its vertical size     Create Mashup Parameters   On the top-left Explorer tab, select the Mashup itself. A drop-down menu indicator will appear in the top-left of the Mashup.                 2. Click the top-left drop-down menu to reveal the Mashup options               3. Select Configure Mashup Parameters to open the Configure Mashup pop-up menu                4. Click Add Parameter three times              5. For the Name fields, enter first_number, second_number, and third_number.         6. Change the Base Type to NUMBER for all three Parameters           7. Click Done to close the Configure Mashup pop-up menu   Bind Mashup Parameters to Widgets   Click the Mashup's drop-down menu in the top-left to expose the options again. There are now additional options for first_number, second_number, and third_number.              2. Drag-and-drop first_number onto the Gauge Widget               3. Select Data on the Select Binding Target pop-up menu of the Gauge Widget.         4. Drag-and-drop second_number onto the LED Display Widget. You may have to first reselect the Mashup itself to reveal the Mashup's drop-down menu to access the second_number Mashup Parameter. Remember that you can easily select the Mashup itself through the Explorer tab.                                    5. Select Data on the Select Binding Target pop-up menu of the LED Display Widget.         6. Drag-and-drop third_number onto the Text Field Widget.         7. Select Text on the Select Binding Target pop-up menu of the Text Field Widget.         8. At the top, click Save. You can expand the Connections window at the bottom and select the Mashup itself to confirm that all three Mashup Parameters have been correctly bound to each Widget.          9. Click the Right Arrow on the far-left of the Mashup Builder to re-expand the Browse navigation menu.         Click here to view Part 3 of this Guide.
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  Display project burn up/down via a convenient Mashup Widget.   GUIDE CONCEPT   Long term projects need to be managed. As a project is scoped, requirements get defined and delivery-timeframes are estimated. As work is done, requirements are completed.   One way to track this project progress is with a Waterfall Chart.   This guide will show you how to utilize a Waterfall Chart Widget to easily display the project workflow.        YOU'LL LEARN HOW TO   Create a Data Shape Create a Thing Create an Info Table Property Populate an Info Table with appropriate data for a Waterfall Chart Create a Mashup Utilize a Waterfall Chart to display project progress   NOTE: This guide's content aligns with ThingWorx 9.3. The estimated time to complete this guide is 30 minutes     Step 1: Create Data Shape   In this scenario, we'll store the Waterfall Chart's data in a Property type called an Info Table.   An Info Table is a spreadsheet-like Property, but in order to define the columns of the table, we first have to define a Data Shape. We'll do that in this step.   In the left-side navigation, click Browse > Modeling > Data Shapes.   At the top, click + New.   In the Name field, type TPWC_DataShape. If Project is not already set, search for and select PTCDefaultProject .   At the top, click Field Definitions.   At the top-left, click + Add.   On the right-side slide-out, in the Name field, type month. Note that you want to leave "Base Type" as the default of "STRING". Check Is Primary Key.   Click the "check with a plus" button for Done and Add.   In the Name field, type amount. Change Base Type, to NUMBER.   Click the "check" button for Done.   At the top, click Save .     Step 2: Create Thing   Now that we have our Data Shape, we can create a Thing to document the project progress over time.   As already mentioned, we'll use an Info Table Property, formatted by the previously-created Data Shape, to do so.   Click Browse > Modeling > Things.   Click + New.   In the Name field, type TPWC_Thing. If Project is not already set, search for and select PTCDefaultProject. In the Base Thing Template field, search for and select GenericThing. At the top, click Save.   Add Info Table Property Now that we have our Thing instantiated, we want to add an Info Table Property. At the top, click Properties and Alerts.   Click + Add.   On the right-side slide-out, in the Name field, type InfoTable_Property. Change Base Type to INFOTABLE. In the Data Shape field, search for and select TPWC_DataShape. Note that the Data Shape field will not appear until you set Base Type to INFOTABLE. Check Persistent.   At the top-right, click the "check" button for Done. At the top, click Save.   Set Value of Property Now that we have a place in which to store spreadsheet-like values, we'll do so manually for testing.  On the InfoTable_Property row, under the Value column, click the "pencil" icon for Set value of property.   On the pop-up, click + Add.   Enter the following values in each field as per the table below: Field Name Value month January amount 380   Click Add.   Repeat Steps 2-4 multiples times until all of the below values have been entered. Note that amount should be left blank for both Mid-Term and Total. Note that you may enter fewer than all the values listed below if so desired, though your final Waterfall Chart will not match the following screenshots. month amount February 85 March 50 April 1000 May -300 June 0 Mid-Term   July 30 August -655 September -100 October -250 November 350 December -100 Total     On the pop-up, click Save.   At the top, click Save.   Step 3: Create Mashup   Now that we have our data in-place for testing (and could be connected to automated systems after we finish testing), we need to visualize the data.   As mentioned, we'll use a Waterfall Chart Widget, but first, we need to create a Mashup into which we can place the Widget.   Click Browse > Visualization > Mashups.   Click + New.   Leave the defaults and click OK.   In the Name field, type TPWC_Mashup. If Project is not already set, search for and select PTCDefaultProject. At the top, click Save.   At the top, click Design.   At the top-left, click the Widgets tab.   Drag-and-drop a Waterfall Chart Widget onto the central Canvas.   At the top, click Save.     Click here to view Part 2 of this guide.
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  Add a Google Map to your UI that visually presents geographical data.   GUIDE CONCEPT This project will introduce how to visually present geographical data in your application. Showing data on a map is a valuable feature for IoT application.   Following the steps in this guide, you will utilize the Google Maps Widget and explore it’s ability to show multiple Things.   We will teach you how to use Geological data to convey pertinent information in your UI.   YOU'LL LEARN HOW TO   Download and import the Google Maps Widget extension Create a Mashup and add a Google Maps Widget Configure the Google Maps Widget to display the locations of multiple Things   NOTE: This guide's content aligns with ThingWorx 9.3. The estimated time to complete ALL 2 parts of this guide is 30 minutes.      Step 1: Configure Google Maps Widget   When you download the Google Maps Widget, it does not include an API key. Google allows some limited use of their map API without a key, however it is recommended that you obtain and add your own Google Maps API key or Client ID (for Google Maps API for Work licenses) to the Google Maps Widget.   The ThingWorx hosted server has already been configured with the Google Maps Widget, including an API key for evaluation use.   Refer to the Google Maps API documentation to obtain your own API key, then follow the steps below.   Download the Google Maps widget from PTC Partner, IQNOX NOTE:  It is necessary to create an account on IQNOX, but the download is free       2. In the lower-left side of Composer, click Import/Export, then Import.           3. In the Import From File pop-up, under Import Option select Extension from the drop-down, then click Browse        4. Navigate to the .zip file you downloaded.          5. Click Import in the Import From File pop-up, then click Close after file is successfully imported.        6. In the ThingWorx Browse tab, in the System section, click on Subsystems, then PlatformSubsystem.            7. Click on the Configuration tab, then click the Edit button if you are not already in edit mode.        8. Scroll down to the Required string to connect with Google for Google widgets field where you enter the Google Maps JavaScript URL with your API key: https://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/js?key=<Your API key>            9. Click Save     Step 2: Add Google Maps Widget to Mashup   Click the Browse folder icon on the top left of ThingWorx Composer.       2. Select Mashups in the left-hand navigation, then click + New to create a new Mashup.                          3. For Mashup Type select Responsive.               NOTE: A Responsive Mashup scales with a browser's screen size. In the steps below we will create 5 containers, one for each widget, to organize how the widgets are presented.        4. Click OK.        5. Enter a name for your Mashup.        6. If Project is not already set, click the + in the Project text box and select the PTCDefaultProject.        7. Click Save        8. Select the Design tab to display Mashup Builder.        9. Click the Widget tab on the top-left, then enter map inside the Filter Widgets field.        10. Drag-and-drop the Google Map widget onto the Mashup.         Step 3: Download Sample Entities   We have created a file with sample entities for this exercise.   Download demoTractors.xml to your computer.       2. Click Import/Export in the lower left of Composer, then select Import          3. Click From File in the drop down, then Browse.        4. Browse to the demoTractors.xml file and click Open.        5. Click Import, then Close after entities are successfully imported.     Step 4: Add Markers to Google Maps Widgets   To display markers on the map you must bind an Info Table to the Widget's Data Property and specify which column has location information. In this example we will use the QueryImplementingThingsWithData Service to bind a group of Things created with the same Template.   Click the + button in the Data tab on the right side of the Mashup Builder window             2. In the Add Data pop-up, click Thing Templates from the Entity Type drop down.                3. Select a Template from the list that has a Location property and was used to create Things. For this exercise, use the ConnectedTractor Template that was imported from the sample file downloaded in the prior step.            4. Enter query into the filter text box then click the arrow to the right of QueryImplementingThingsWithData.                                              5. Click the Execute on Load check box, then click Done. This will cause the QueryImplementingThingsWithData Service to execute as soon as Mashup is loaded.                                          6. Expand Returned Data if you do not see All Data then click and drag All Data onto the Google Maps Widget.        7. Click Data in the Select Binding Target pop-up.          8. In the Properties panel in the lower left, scroll to see the LocationField property and select Location, the name of the Property with location information.       Test Map Operation   Click Save to save your Mashup.       2. Click View Mashup to see the Google Maps Widget displaying the locations of each Thing.     NOTE: The Google Maps Widget has built-in functionality that allows users to pan and resize the map as well as switch to satellite photo maps.     Click here to view Part 2 of this Guide.
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  Discover how ThingWorx Widgets can be implemented in a compelling Mashup design.   Guide Concept   This project will introduce how to create complex user interfaces that are built by combining simple Widgets and basic styling.   Following the steps in this guide, you will build a web application showing both geographic and table based information.   We will teach you how to create a professional user interface that effectively conveys information to users.     You'll learn how to   Organize UI elements in a Mashup layout Use the Repeater widget effectively Use Styles to customize UI elements within a Mashup   NOTE: This guide's content aligns with ThingWorx 9.3. The estimated time to complete ALL parts of this guide is 60 minutes     Step 1: Top Level Layout   A Mashup like this does take some time to assemble, but is built by layering simple Widgets. In this guide, we will break down how this Mashup was created to give you a behind-the-scenes look and provide tips to use when developing your IoT application.     This professional-looking Mashup was created using only these Widgets:   Layout with both left and right sidebars and a footer Tabs - Responsive Repeater Navigation Image Property Display Gauge Google Map   The first Widget placed on this Mashup canvas was a Layout widget with both a Left and a Right Sidebar defined. The center portion of the layout has only one GoogleMap widget. The tractor icons displayed on the map were created by uploading a .png to create a Media entity then specifying the image as a custom MarkerStyle in the GoogleMap widget. In the following steps you will duplicate this Mashup.         Step 2: Import Data   In this step we will download and them import both a Thing Template and the sample data that are used throughout the exercise.   Download and save ConnectedTractors.xml which contains the Thing Template and example Things. In the lower left of Composer, click Import/Export, then Import.     In the Import From File pop-up, keep the defaults and click Browse.     Navigate to the ConnectedTractors.xml file you previously downloaded. Select the Entities file, then click Open. Click Import in the bottom right of the pop up, then click Close after file is successfully imported.     Step 3: Map Mashup   Follow the steps in this part of the lesson to create a Mashup with an organized, structured layout.   Create Mashup   Navigate to Browse > Visualization > Mashups.   Click + New.   Keep the defaults and click OK.   In the Name field, type TractorDemoMashup. If Project is not already set, click the + in the Project text box and select the PTCDefaultProject.   Click Save Click the Design tab in the Mashup Information panel Click the Layout tab, then click Add Left . Scroll down to Container Size, click Fixed Size then enter200 in the Width text box and press Tab to record your entry.   Click on the right side of your Mashup to select the larger container. Click Add Right before again scrolling down to Container Size, click Fixed Size then enter200 in the Width text box and press Tab to record your entry.        NOTE: The next step uses the Google Map Widget which may need to be downloaded and imported from IQNOX.com. A Step-by-step guide for using Google Maps with ThingWorx is available.   12. Click the Widgets tab on the top left of the Widget panel, then enter map in the search box of the Widget panel. 13. Click and drag the Google Map Widget onto the center area of the canvas. 14. Click Save   15. In the Data panel on the right click the + to add a data source for the Mashup. 16. Enter the name of the Template used to create the Things that will be shown on the Mashup. Click on the Template ConnectedTractor to use the sample data 17. Click the arrow to the right of GetImplementingThingsWithData, then click the Execute on Load check box before clicking Done.     Setup Map Data   In the Data panel on the right, if neccesary, expand the GetImplementingThingsWithData data source and then drag the All Data row onto the map widget.   Click Data in the Select Binding Target pop-up to connect the data source to the Data property of the Google Maps widget. In the Properties panel in the lower left, scroll to the LocationField property then select TractorLatLng   NOTE: The imported sample data provided for this lesson has a property named TractorLatLng that contains location information. Fields in the bound data with a type Location will be available in the drop down. 4. Click Save at the top of your Mashup. Click View Mashup to see the live map. NOTE: The map uses the standard markers, click on one of the markers to see that the marker changes to indicate that it is selected.     Customize Map Markers   In this part of the lesson we will show how to use a custom image for the map markers. Right-click on each of the images below to download and save them to use in the next step.       We will upload these images to create new Media entities and apply them to the Google Map widget. Click Browse > Visualization > Media.   Click + New. In the Name field, type TractorSelected.   If Project is not already set, click the + in the Project text box and select the PTCDefaultProject. Under Image, click Change. Navigate to and select the TractorSelected.png file you just downloaded. On the navigation pop-up, click Open to close the pop-up and confirm the image selection. At the top of Foundation, click Save.    Repeat steps 1 through 8 for TracktorUnselected. Open your Mashup and click on the Google Map widget. Click on Style Properties tab in the lower left and scroll to the MarkerStyle Property and click on the Default map marker image, then click edit.   Click Style Information in the left panel, then clear the default image by clicking the X next to Image.   Click the + to select a new image then scroll to the Media entity you just created. In this case, the TractorUnselected media. Click Save. NOTE: The Google Map widget is packaged with default style entities. By editing these styles we will change the markers for all Mashups running on this ThingWorx server. In later steps we show how to create one time use Styles instead of modifying the default Styles.   14. Repeat steps 1 through 8 to create and assign the TractorSelected image for the SelectedMarkerStyle Property. 15. Click Save for the Mashup, then View Mashup to see the custom map icons.       Step 4: Navigation Panel   The left sidebar defines the green background color in its style and contains just one Collection widget with custom embedded Mashups specified for both the Selected and the Unselected items. The logo at the bottom is an image defined in the Footer style.   The Collection widget works by duplicating an embedded panel Mashup that controls the display of data from each entity in collection of entities.   Add Footer   Select the left side container of your Mashup, then click the Layout tab Click Add Bottom and scroll down to Container Size, click Fixed Size then enter 60 in the Height text box and press Tab to record your entry.   Click Save.   Style Sidebar   Next, we are going to add a custom background color and image to the sidebar footer.   Click the Explorer tab in the widget panel then select the top container for the left sidebar.   Click the Style Properties tab in the lower left properties panel, then click to expand Base and flexcontainer. In the background tex box, enter #39736C for a dark green color, then press Tab.   Click the top left container, then, in the Style Properties tab, click to expand Base and flexcontainer. Click X in background property   Click the lower left container, and also click X to remove the background property.   Right-click on the image below to download and save it for use when we add a footer in the next step.   Create a Media entity as we did for the map markers by clicking the Browse folder icon, then click Media in the Visualization section. Click the + New to create a new Media entity. Enter twxpwr in the Name field for the footer image. If Project is not already set, click the + in the Project text box and select the PTCDefaultProject. Click Change in the Image section, then browse to the image you saved. Click Open, then Save.   Click in the lower-left footer container on your mashup, then click the Properties tab. Scroll to see the SourceURL property in the properties panel, then click the + to open the media selection window. Scroll to browse for the Media you just created.   Click the footer Media and then slick Save in Mashup Builder before continuing to the next step.     Click here to view Part 2 of this guide.
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  Utilize the Menu Widget to navigate between multiple Mashups.   Guide Concept   Frequently, your application needs to display more information than can comfortably fit on a single page, but manually linking to multiple Mashups can be tedious.   Instead, you can utilize a Menu Entity, Menu Widget, and a Master Mashup to provide consistent navigation between all the pages of your application.      You'll learn how to   Create a Mashup to be used as a "Home" page Create more Mashups as subpages Create a Menu Entity to track Mashups Create a Master Mashup as a Header Utilize a Menu Widget for navigation   NOTE: This guide's content aligns with ThingWorx 9.3. The estimated time to complete this guide is 30 minutes     Step 1: Scenario   In this guide, we'll assume a scenario where you're an application designer for LightCo, a company that designs and sells smart, connected street, interior, and other lighting products.    In particular, LightCo is interested in using ThingWorx Foundation to operate and control lighting for industrial and city applications.    There's a tentative deal in the works with a city park replacing all their path lighting with high-efficiency models. There's also an outdoor amphitheater in the park that could be added to the deal if the functionality to properly control it is present.     LightCo's intention is to use Foundation to provide a level of control for this application that otherwise wouldn't be possible, as a differentiator versus the competition bidding on the same project.   Since control of both the park-lighting and amphitheater lighting needs to be separate, putting both controls on the same Mashup page would not only be counterintuitive but could possibly lead to errors.    So, in this guide, we'll setup our base page layout for this lighting application. We'll create both a homepage (where we could add login or other elements), as well as separate pages for the park vs the amphitheater. We'll then create a Master Mashup with a Menu for easy navigation between these three initial pages.       Step 2: Create Home Page   First, we want to create a Mashup to represent our homepage.    There doesn't have to be much to it, as we could come back later to develop it further. We just need it to be pre-created to later include it in our Menu.    In Foundation, click Browse > Visualization > Mashups.   At the top-left, click +New.   Leave the defaults and click OK.   In the Name field, type MNWM_Homepage_Mashup. If Project is not already set, search for and select PTCDefaultProject.   At the top, click Save.   At the top, click Design.     Homepage Layout   As mentioned, we don't really want to design our final Homepage right now. Instead, we're simply getting it started to leave ourselves a relatively blank canvas that we can utilize later.    Still, we need to add something. If nothing else, we need something that we can see so that we know we're on the correct page when we click through our Menu options.   We know we'll want our company's name, i.e. LightCo, and probably an image, login, or something else below. So let's subdivide the Mashup into a smaller top part for the name and a bigger bottom section for future functionality.   In the top-left, ensure that the Layout tab is active.   Click Add Top.   Scroll down in the Layout tab to reveal Container Size.   With the top-section of the Canvas selected, click Fixed Size.   In the Height field, type 100 and hit your keyboard's Tab key to apply the change.   Click Save.   Add Company Name   In the top section, we'll add a Label Widget for our company's name.   At the top-left, click the Widgets tab.   Drag-and-drop a Label Widget onto the top section of the Canvas.   With the Label Widget selected, in the bottom-left Properties tab, change LabelText to LightCo and hit your keyboard's Tab key to apply it.   With the Label Widget still selected, in the bottom-left, click the Style Properties tab.   Under Style Properties, expand Base > Label.   Change font-size to 48px.   Click Save.     Step 3: Create Subpage One   Now that we have a basic LightCo homepage in-place, we need subpages to separately control the park-lighting vs the amphitheater-lighting.    But, yet again, we're not designing the actual pages yet. We're just creating them so we can reference them in a Menu.    An easy way to create additional Mashups that have similar layouts is with the Duplicate action. We'll do so now.    Return to Browse > Mashups.   To the left of MNWM_Homepage_Mashup, click the checkbox.   At the top, click Duplicate.   In the Name field, type MNWM_ParkLighting_Mashup. If Project is not already set, search for and select PTCDefaultProject.   At the top, click Save. At the top, click Design.   Change Label Title   Since we used Duplicate to clone the homepage, we see the same header/page Layout which we previously designed. That Layout can be useful for separating page-titles from functionality, so let's keep it.   But we also see the LightCo LabelText we previously created. Since this is the Park Lighting Control page, we need to change it.   In the top section of the Canvas, click the Label Widget to select it.   In the bottom-left, return to the Properties tab.   In the LabelText field, replace the current text with Park Lighting Control, and hit your keyboard's Tab key to apply the change.   At the top, click Save.     Step 4: Create Subpage Two   In the same way that we used Duplicate to mirror the homepage into a park-lighting page, we'll now do the same for the amphitheater-lighting page.    Return to Browse > Mashups. To the left of MNWM_Homepage_Mashup, click the checkbox. At the top, click Duplicate. In the Name field, type MNWM_AmphitheaterLighting_Mashup. If Project is not already set, search for and select PTCDefaultProject.   At the top, click Save. At the top, click Design.   Change LabelText   Just as we did with the Park Lighting Control LabelText, we now want to change this duplicate to read Amphitheater Lighting Control.   In the top section of the Canvas, click the Label Widget to select it. In the bottom-left, return to the Properties tab (if you're not already there). In the LabelText field, replace the current text with Amphitheater Lighting Control, and hit your keyboard's Tab key to apply the change.   Click Save.     Step 5: Create Menu   Having created all three of our starting Mashups, we'll now create a Menu Entity which provides links to each of them.   We'll be able to use this Menu Entity later to configure a Menu Widget for navigation.    Navigate to Browse > Visualization > Menus.   Click +New.    In the Name field, type MNWM_Menu. If Project is not already set, search for and select PTCDefaultProject.    At the top, click Save.   Menu Definitions   Now that we have created the Menu Entity, we can add Menu Definitions with links to all the previously-created pages.   At the top, click Menu Definition. Click +Add.   On the right-side slide-out, in the Title field, type Home. In the Link field, search for and select MNWM_Homepage_Mashup.   In the top-right, click the "check with a plus" button for Done and Add.   In the Title field, type Park. In the Link field, search for and select MNWM_ParkLighting_Mashup.   In the top-right, click the "check with a plus" button for Done and Add. In the Title field, type Amphitheater. In the Link field, search for and select MNWM_AmphitheaterLighting_Mashup.   At the top-right, click the "check" button for Done. At the top, click Save.     Click here to view Part 2 of this guide.
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  Step 5: Mashup Builder API   The following APIs can be accessed by a widget in the context of the Mashup Builder:    API                                                                                                                Description this.jqElementId This is the DOM element ID of your object after renderHtml(). this.jqElement This is the jquery element. this.getProperty(name) / this.setProperty(name,value) Note that every call to this function will call afterSetProperty() if it’s defined in the widget. this.updatedProperties() This function should be called anytime properties are changed in the widget so that the Mashup Builder can update the widget properties window, the connections window, and so on. this.getInfotableMetadataForProperty(propertyName) If you need the infotable metadata for a property that you bound, you can get it by calling this API; it returns undefined if it is not bound. this.resetPropertyToDefaultValue(propertyName) This call resets the named property to its default value. this.removeBindingsFromPropertyAsTarget(propertyName) This call removes target data bindings from the propertyName. Use it only when the user has initiated an action that invalidates the property. this.removeBindingsFromPropertyAsSource(propertyName) This call removes source data bindings from the propertyName. Use this only when the user has initiated an action that invalidates the property. this.isPropertyBoundAsTarget(propertyName) This call returns a result that indicates if the property has been bound as a target. You can use it to determine if a property has been set or bound. this.isPropertyBoundAsSource(propertyName) This call returns a result that indicates if the property has been bound as a source. You can use it to determine if a property has been bound to a target.   Example of the Checkbox Widget’s validate() function: this.validate = function () { var result = []; if (!this.isPropertyBoundAsSource('State') && !this.isPropertyBoundAsTarget('State')) { result.push({ severity: 'warning', message: 'State for {target-id} is not bound' }); } return result; }   Example of the Blog Widgets validate() function: this.validate = function () { var result = []; var blogNameConfigured = this.getProperty('Blog'); if (blogNameConfigured === '' || blogNameConfigured === undefined) { if (!this.isPropertyBoundAsTarget('Blog')) { result.push({ severity: 'warning', message: 'Blog is not bound for {target-id}' }); } } return result; }     Step 6: Mashup Builder Callbacks   The following widget functions are called by the Mashup Builder to control the widget’s behavior. widgetProperties() - Returns a JSON structure that defines the properties of the widget. Listed are the possible properties of the widget:   Required Property   The only required property is:   name - The user-friendly widget name, as shown in the widget toolbar   Optional Properties   There are a number of optional properties that can be contained in the returned JSON structure.    Property                                                                 Description description A description of the widget, used for its tooltip. iconImage - File name of the widget icon/image category An array of strings for specifying one or more categories to which the widget belongs (such as “Common”, “Charts”, “Data”, “Containers”, and “Components”), enabling widgets to be filtered by type/category. isResizable true (default) or false defaultBindingTargetProperty Name of the property to use as the data/event binding target borderWidth If the widget has a border, set this property to the width of the border. This property ensures pixel-perfect WYSIWG between design and runtime. If you set a border of one pixel on the widget-content element at design time, you are making the widget two pixels taller and two pixels wider (one pixel on each side). To account for this discrepancy, set the borderWidth property to make the design-time widget the same number of pixels smaller. This property places the border inside the widget that you created and makes the width and height in the widget properties accurate. isContainer true or false (default). Controls whether an instance of the widget can be a container for other widget instances. customEditor The name of the custom editor dialog for entering and editing the widget configuration. The system assumes there is a dialog you created named TW.IDE.Dialogs.<name>. customEditorMenuText The text that appears on the flyout menu of the widget and the tooltip text for the Configure Widget Properties button. For example, “Configure Grid Columns.” allowPositioning true (default) or false supportsLabel true or false (default). If true, the widget exposes a label property used to create a text label that appears next to the widget in the Composer and at runtime. supportsAutoResize true or false (default). If true, the widget can be placed in responsive containers (such as columns, rows, responsive tabs, responsive mashups). properties A collection of JSON objects for the widget that describe the properties of the widget that can be modified when the widget is added to a mashup. These properties are displayed in the Properties window of the Mashup Builder - the name of each object is used as the property name and the corresponding attributes control how the property value is set. afterLoad() Called after the object is loaded and properties have been restored from the file, but before the object has been rendered renderHtml() [required] Returns HTML fragment that the Composer will place in the screen; the widget’s content container (e.g. div) must have a ‘widget-content’ class specified. After this container element is appended to the DOM, it becomes accessible via jqElement and its DOM element ID will be available in jqElementId widgetEvents() A collection of events. warnIfNotBound true or false; If true, the property will be checked by Composer to determine whether it is bound, then generate a to-do item if/when it is not. widgetServices() A collection of services. warnIfNotBound true or false; If true, the property will be checked by the Composer to determine whether it is bound, then generate a to-do item if/when it is not. afterRender() Called after the HTML fragment is inserted into the DOM. beforeDestroy() Called right before the widget’s DOM element gets removed and the widget is detached from its parent widget and delocated; this is the place in which to perform any clean-up of resources (e.g. plugins, event handlers) acquired throughout the lifetime of the widget. beforeSetProperty(name,value) [Mashup Builder only - not at runtime] Called before any property is updated within Composer; this is a good place to perform validation on the new property value before it is committed. If a message string is returned, then the message will be displayed to the user, and the new property value will not be committed. If nothing is returned, then the value is assumed to be valid. afterSetProperty(name,value) [Mashup Builder only - not at runtime] Called after any property is updated within Composer. Return true to have the widget re-rendered in Composer. afterAddBindingSource(bindingInfo) Whenever data is bound to the widget, you will call back with this (if you implemented it … it’s optional). The only field in bindingInfo is targetProperty which is the propertyName that was just bound. validate() Called when Composer refreshes its to-do list. The call must return an array of result objects with severity (optional and not implemented) and message (required) properties. The message text may contain one or more pre-defined tokens, such as {target-id}, which will contain a hyperlink that allows the user to navigate to or select the specific widget that generated the message.   Properties Section Breakdown   The following attributes can be specified for each property object:    Aspect                                           Description description A description of the widget, which is used for its tooltip. baseType The system base type name - if the baseType value is FIELDNAME the widget property window displays a dropdown list of fields available in the INFOTABLE bound to the sourcePropertyName value based on the baseTypeRestriction. mustImplement If the baseType is THINGNAME and you specify “mustImplement”, the Mashup Builder will restrict popups to those implementing the specified EntityType and EntityName [by calling QueryImplementingThings against said EntityType and EntityName]. baseTypeInfotableProperty If baseType is RENDERERWITHFORMAT, baseTypeInfotableProperty specifies which property’s infotable is used for configuration. sourcePropertyName When the property’s baseType is FIELDNAME, this attribute is used to determine which INFOTABLE’s fields are to be used to populate the FIELDNAME dropdown list. baseTypeRestriction When specified, this value is used to restrict the fields available in the FIELDNAME dropdown list. tagType If the baseType is TAGS this can be ‘DataTags’ (default) or ‘ModelTags.’ defaultValue Default undefined; used only for ‘property’ type. isBindingSource true or false; Allows the property to be a data binding source, default to false. isBindingTarget true or false; Allows the property to be a data binding target, default to false. isEditable true or false; Controls whether the property can be edited in Composer, default to true. isVisible true or false; Controls whether the property is visible in the properties window, default to true. isLocalizable true or false; Only important if baseType is STRING - controls whether the property can be localized or not. selectOptions An array of value / (display) text structures. warnIfNotBoundAsSource true or false; If true, the property will be checked by Composer to determine whether it is bound and generate a to-do item if/when it is not. warnIfNotBoundAsTarget true or false; If true, the property will be checked by Composer to determine whether it is bound and generate a to-do item if/when it is not.   Other Special BaseType   Additional special baseTypes:   STATEDEFINITION - Picks a StateDefinition STYLEDEFINITION - Picks a StyleDefinition RENDERERWITHSTATE - Displays a dialog and allows you to select a renderer and formatting. Note: You can set a default style by entering the string with the default style name in the defaultValue. When your binding changes, you should reset it to the default value, as shown in the code below:   this.afterAddBindingSource = function (bindingInfo) { if(bindingInfo['targetProperty'] === 'Data') { this.resetPropertyToDefaultValue('ValueFormat'); } }; STATEFORMATTING - Displays a dialog and allows you to pick a fixed style or state-based style. Note: You can set a default style by entering the string with the default style name in the defaultValue. When your binding changes, you should reset it to the default value as shown in the code above for RENDERERWITHSTATE. VOCABULARYNAME - Will pick a DataTag vocabulary   Some Examples   An example of the properties property: properties: { Prompt: { defaultValue: 'Search for...', baseType: STRING, isLocalizable: true }, Width: { defaultValue: 120 }, Height: { defaultValue: 20, isEditable: false }, }   An example of mustImplement: 'baseType': 'THINGNAME', 'mustImplement': { 'EntityType': 'ThingShapes', 'EntityName': 'Blog' }   An example of selectOptions:[ {value: ‘optionValue1’, text: ‘optionText1’}, {value: ‘optionValue2’, text: ‘optionText2’} ]   An example of validate function that allows you to navigate/select the specific widget that generated the message: this.validate = function () { var result = []; var srcUrl = this.getProperty('SourceURL'); if (srcUrl === '' || srcUrl === undefined) { result.push({ severity: 'warning', message: 'SourceURL is not defined for {target-id}'}); } return result; }     Click here to view Part 3 of this guide.
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    Step 4: Use Collection Widget   At this point, you have created the following Entities:   A Thing with data stored in an Info Table Property (columns defined by a Data Shape)   A base Mashup (containing Gauge, LED Display, and Text Field Widgets) that displays an individual row of data from the table   Now, you need to use the Collection Widget to display this Mashup for every row of data in the table.   On the ThingWorx Composer Browse tab, click Visualization > Mashups, + New              2. Keep the default of Responsive with no Templates chosen, and click OK.        3. In the Name field, enter cwht_collection_mashup              4. If Project is not already set, search for and select PTCDefaultProject.        5, Click Save.        6. Click Design               7.  On the top-left Layout tab, ensure that the default of Positioning > Responsive is selected.  You want the "base" Mashup to generally be Static, while the "collection" Mashup should be Responsive to allow it to grow to an appropriate size.         8. From the top-left Widgets tab, drag-and-drop a Collection Widget onto the central Canvas area.       Access Mashup Data Service   Click the + icon at the top-right to open the Add Data pop-up menu.               2. In the Entity Filter field, search for and select cwht_thing.         3. In the Services Filter field, enter getproperties.         4. Click the right arrow beside GetProperties to add the GetProperties Service to the right-side of the pop-up menu.         5. Click the Execute on Load checkbox             6. Click Done to close the pop-up menu. The GetProperties Service of the cwht_thing is now shown on the right under the Data tab.         7. On the top-right, expand GetProperties.           8. Drag-and-drop GetProperties > infotable_property onto the Collection Widget            9. On the Select Binding Target pop-up, click Data     Configure Properties   In the Collection Widget's Filter Properties field in the bottom-left, enter mashup. This will limit the displayed Properties of the Collection Widget (in the bottom-left section) to only those containing the word "mashup".            2.  For the Mashup Property, search for and select cwht_base_mashup.  Choosing "cwht_base_mashup" lets the Collection Widget know which base Mashup to repeat in every Cell               3. In the MashupHeight field, enter 250 and hit the Tab keyboard key to apply the change. This Property changes the height of each Cell of the Collection Widget. Ensure the height is large enough to fit all of the Widgets.          4. In the MashupWidth field, enter 500 and hit the Tab keyboard key.  This Property changes the width of each Cell of the Collection Widget. Ensure the is large enough to fit all of the Widgets.            5. In the Filter Properties field, enter uidfield.          6. In the UIDField drop-down, select first_number.  The UIDField sets the unique identifier for the Collection Widget.            7. In the Filter Properties field, enter sort.          8. In the SortField drop-down, select first_number.  SortField determines which sub-section of the Infotable to use for sorting purposes.          9. Check the SortAscending checkbox            10. n the Filter Properties field, enter mashupprop           11. Click Add, copy-and-paste the following JSON into the MashupPropertyBinding Property, replacing the existing curly braces {}, then click Done.   The point of this JSON is to relate the columns of the Infotable Property to the Mashup Parameters that we previously defined in the base Mashup. { "first_number" : "first_number", "second_number" : "second_number", "third_number" : "third_number" }                12. Click Save, then View Mashup.     Notice that the base Mashup we previously created has been replicated multiple times, corresponding to each row of the Info Table Property.   As an extension exercise, go back into cwht_thing and add another row of data. Refresh the Collection Widget Mashup to see another instantiation of the base Mashup automatically added to display that new row.   A Mashup utilizing the Collection Widget dynamically expands to accommodate both the user and the available data.   Step 5: Next Steps   Congratulations! You've successfully completed the Organize Your UI guide, and learned how to: Create a Datashape to define columns of a table Create a Thing with an Info Table Property Create a base Mashup to display data Utilize a Collection Widget to display data from multiple rows of a table Learn More   We recommend the following resources to continue your learning experience: Capability Guide Build Application Development Tips & Tricks Experience ThingWorx Application Development Reference   Additional Resources   If you have questions, issues, or need additional information, refer to:   Resource  Link Community Developer Community Forum Support Collection Widget Help Center  
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  Step 8: Troubleshooting   Issue                                       Resolution CSS does not seem to be applied to the Mashup. Verify your CSS is included in the runtime TWX CSS. Clear Browser cache if your CSS is not merged to the combined TWX CSS. (under debug mode: Hold refresh button->Clear Cache). TWX fails to import the extension. If the extension is already installed, but you made recent changes, you need to bump the Version number in the metadata.xml. Recent CSS changes are ignored. Clear browser cache if your CSS file has changed recently.     Step 9: Next Steps   Congratulations! You've successfully completed the Add Style to Your UI with CSS guide, and learned how to:   Create custom CSS classes using the integrated CSS editor Bind CSS classes to a Mashup and to individual Widgets Use Media queries to dynamically apply styling   Learn More   We recommend the following resources to continue your learning experience:    Capability     Guide Build Application Development Tips & Tricks Experience ThingWorx Application Development Reference   Additional Resources   If you have questions, issues, or need additional information, refer to:  Resource       Link Community Developer Community Forum Support Help Center
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  Basic Mashup Widgets Guide Part 3   Step 5: Gauge   A Gauge is best for displaying a quickly readable approximate value. Select the Widgets tab in the uppper panel of the left dock, then enter gauge inside the Filter field in the top left. Drag-and-drop the Gauge widget onto the bottom-center container. We will now bind the Slider to the Gauge. Click the Slider Widget in the top-right Container. Click the drop-down arrow on the left side of the Slider widget. Click and drag the Value property listed in the Slider drop-down onto the Gauge widget.   Click the # Data property that is available from the Select Binding Target pop-up.   Click Save to save your Mashup. Click View Mashup then adjust the slider to the left to see the changing value shown on the widget. Many properties are available that give control over how the Gauge widget will be displayed. Many properties can be changed both statically when designing the mashup, and dynamically in response to changes in property values.   Bindable Name Type Default Direction Description Data Number None Input Value displayed by gauge indicator MinValue Number 0 Input Value used for lowest gauge display MaxValue Number 100 Input Value used for highest gauge display Legend String None Input Text Shown under Gauge ToolTipField String None Input Text shown when mouse hovers over gauge Visible Boolean True Input Widget is visible if set to true   Static Name Type Default Description DisplayName String None Name used for widget in user-facing interactions Description String None Description used for widget in user-facing interactions MinorTicks Number 4 Number of minor ticks per interval TickLength Number 8 Tick mark length MinorTickLength Number 4 Minor tick length ValueDisplayMode None/Top/Bottom/Inside None Location on gauge where numeric value is shown. LabelDigits Number 3 Number of digits for label display LabelDecimals Number 0 Number of decimals for label display ValueDigits Number 3 Number of digits for value display ValueDecimals Number 0 Number of decimals for value display LegendDisplayMode None/Top/Bottom None Location on gauge where Legend is displayed ReferenceAngle Number 225 Angle that controls the gauge orientation (degrees) Aperture Number 270 Angle that controls the gauge size (degrees) NeedleDiameter Number 10 Diameter of the gauge needle (pixels) CenterDiameter Number 20 Diameter of the gauge center (pixels) GaugeBorder Number 20 Width of the outside gauge border (pixels)     Step 6: Grid Advanced   A Grid Advanced widget is used to display data to a mashup user in a table Select the Widgets tab in the uppper panel of the left dock, then enter grid inside the Filter field in the top-left. Drag-and-drop the Grid Advanced widget onto the top-left container on your Mashup that already has the Button Widget. Add Data Source   Before you can customize the Grid display, you must first bind an Infotable to the Grid's Data property. In this example we will use the QueryImplementingThingsWithData Service to bind a group of Things created with the same Template. We have created a file with sample entities for this exercise. Download the attached demoTractors.xml. Click Import/Export in the lower left of Composer, then select Import   Click From File in the drop down, then Browse. Browse to the demoTractors.xml file and click Open. Click Import, then Close after entities are successfully imported. Click the green + button in the Data tab on the right side of the Mashup Builder window. In the Select Entity panel click Thing Templates from the drop down.   Scroll through the available Thing Templates and select the Connected Tractors Template that was imported. Enter query into the filter text box then click the arrow to the right of QueryImplementingThingsWithData. Click the Execute on Load check box, this option will execute the QueryImplementingThingsWithData Service when the Mashup is loaded.   Click Done. Click the arrow icon to expand QueryImplementingThingsWithDate, and Returned Data. Click and drag All Data onto the Grid widget.   Click Data in the Select Binding Target pop-up.   NOTE: The Grid widget now shows Property names in the column headers.  15. Click the drop down in the upper left of the Grid widget, then click Configure Grid Columns to show the Configure Grid Columns pop-up. 16. Uncheck the check box next to the property names in the left-hand panel that you don't want shown in the Grid. NOTE: You can drag and drop the property names to change the display order. You can customize Column names and formatting by making changes in this window. 17. Click Done when you are satisfied with the column formatting options. 18. Click Save to save your Mashup. 19. Click View Mashup.         In addition to properties that give control over how a Grid widget will be displayed, the scroll position of a Grid can be read in the CurrentScrollTop property and can be set with the ScrollTop property.   Bindable Name Type Default Direction Description Data Infotable None Input The data that is displayed in the Grid EditedTable Infotable None Output The data that is in the Grid after a user edit CurrentScrollTop Number 0 Output How far down (in pixels from the top of the full data list) the Grid is currently scrolled ScrollTop Number 0 Input How far down (in pixels from the top of the full data list) the Grid will be scrolled. Visible boolean true Input Widget is visible if set to true   Static Name Type Default Description DisplayName String None Name used for widget in user facing interactions Description String None Description used for widget in user facing interactions RowFormat StateDefinition None Specify a State Formatter to control display of the data in each grid row AlignHeader Boolean False When enabled, align column headers with their data MultiSelect Boolean False allow multiple items to be selected IsEditable Boolean False Allow grid value editing in Configure Grid Columns pop-up AutoSelectFirstRow Boolean False Automatically select the first row upon initial loading of data. CellTextWrapping Boolean False Enable or disable text wrapping within the grid cells. TabSequence Number 0 Tab sequence index   Widget Events Name Description DoubleClicked Fired when user double clicks on the grid   Step 7: Next Steps   Congratulations on completing the guide!   The next guide in the Customize UI and Display Options to Deploy Applications learning path is Define Your UI Style.    If you have questions, issues, or need additional information, refer to: Resource Link Experience ThingWorx Application Development Reference Community Developer Community Forum Support Button Widget Help Center Support Slider Widget Help Center Support Gauge Widget Help Center Support Advanced Grids (Themable) Help Center    
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  How to Display Data in Charts Guide Part 3   Step 6: Configure Charts   You now have a test Thing that has an Info Table Property and Time Series Property with values appropriate for display in various Chart Widgets, as well as a Mashup with those charts inside. However, in order for the Widget to display data, you need to bind it to the data source.   Bring Data into the Mashup   Select the Data tab in the top-right section of Composer.   Click the green + button under Data.   In the Entity Filter field, search for and select DDCThing. In the Services Filter field, type GetProperties. Click the right-arrow beside GetProperties The GetProperties Service will now appear on the right under Selected Services. Check the Execute on Load box under Selected Services. This will cause the GetProperties Service to execute as soon as the Mashup is loaded.   6. In the Services Filter field, type QueryPropertyHistory. 7. Click the right-arrow beside QueryPropertyHistory. 8. Check the Execute on Load box under Selected Services. 9. Click Done to close the Add Data pop-up window.   Drag-and-Drop Data Bindings   Under the Data tab, expand the Things_DDCThing > GetProperties service.   Drag GetProperties > InfoTableProperty to the Pie Chart Widget in the top-left section of the Canvas.           3. On the Select Binding Target pop-up, select Data. 4. Repeat steps 2-3 for the Label, Proportional, and Bubble charts. Note that the Bubble chart will be bound to DataSource1 rather than Data.     5. Drag-and-drop QueryPropertyHistory > Returned Data > All Data to the Line Chart Widget in the bottom-middle section of the Canvas. 6. On the Select Binding Target pop-up, select Data. 7. Repeat steps 5-6 for the Event Chart in the bottom-right of the Canvas.   Configure Chart Properties   Click the Pie Chart in the top-left of the Canvas to select it. In the bottom-left section of Composer, showing the Properties of the Pie Chart, type LabelField in the Filter Properties field. For the LabelField drop-down, select Label.   In the Filter Properties window, type ValueField. In the ValueField drop-down, select Value.       Repeat steps 1-5 for each of the other charts, making the following Widget Property changes: Chart Property Setting Label XAxisField XAxis Label DataField1 Data Proportional XAxisField XAxis Proportional DataField 1 ASensor Proportional DataField 2 BSensor Proportional DataField 3 CSensor Bubble XAxisField1 XValue Bubble YAxisField1 YValue Bubble BubbleValueField1 BubbleValue Line XAxisField timestamp Event XAxisField timestamp Event LabelField TimeSeriesProperty 7. At the top, click Save. 8. Click View Mashup.     Step 7: Next Steps   Congratulations!  In this guide, you learned how to:   Create a Data Shape to format an Info Table Create a Value Stream to record Property Value changes Create a Thing with an Info Table Property and a Time Series Property Create a Mashup with various Chart Widgets Link your Thing's Properties to the Chart Widgets   This is the last guide in the Customize UI and Display Options to Deploy Applications learning path.    Additional Resources   If you have questions, issues, or need additional information, refer to:   Resource Link Community Developer Community Forum Support Widget Help Center    
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How to Display Data in Charts Guide Part 1   Overview   This project will introduce various Chart Widgets. Following the steps in this guide, you will learn how to graphically represent multiple data points simultaneously. We will teach you how to utilize the Pie, Label, Proportional, Bubble, Time Series, and Event Charts. NOTE: This guide's content aligns with ThingWorx 9.3. The estimated time to complete ALL 3 parts of this guide is 60 minutes.    Step 1: Introduction   As an IoT application developer, there are times when you want to display multiple data points simultaneously. In this situation, it is often helpful to make use of one of the various Chart Widgets. This guide will discuss the following Chart Widget options: *Old widget = no web component replacement Pie – old widget Label (Legacy) Proportional – old widget Bubble – old widget Line – new web component Event – old widget Before you can display this information in your UI, you need to first configure the ThingWorx system to store those values. For the time-series charts (including both the Line and Event Charts), you need to store information in a time-series friendly manner. In this case, we’ll use a Value Stream to store Property value changes. We’ll use an Info Table (similar to a spreadsheet) to track the values for the non-time-series charts (Pie, Label, Proportional, and Bubble).   Step 2: Create Data Shape   Many data structures in ThingWorx require a Data Shape to format their values. This is true for a Stream, a Data Table, and an Info Table. We'll be using an Info Table in this example. NOTE: Any time you use an Info Table, you must first define a Data Shape. From the Browse tab of ThingWorx Composer, click Modeling > Data Shapes, + New.   In the Name field, enter DDCDataShape.   If Project is not already set, search for and select PTCDefaultProject.  At the top, click Field Definitions.   Click + Add. In the Name field, enter PrimaryKey. Change Base Type to INTEGER. Check the Is Primary Key box. The primary key is used to uniquely identify a row of data. DataShapes used for DataTable configuration must have a primary key. 9. Click the "Check with a +" button for Done and Add. 10. In the Name field, enter Label. 11. Leave Base Type as the default of STRING. 12. Click the "Check with a +" button for Done and Add. 13. Repeatedly add additional fields, each with a Base Type of NUMBER, until all of the following Field Definitions have been entered: Value XAxis Data ASensor BSensor CSensor XValue YValue BubbleValue Note that you'll want to click the "Check" button for Done after entering the last definition. 14. Click Save.    Step 3: Create Value Stream   An easy way to record changes to a Thing Property is via enabling the Logged functionality. However, without a place in which to log the changes, logging the Property does nothing. One way in which to create a storage location for Property changes is a Value Stream. On the ThingWorx Composer Browse tab, click Data Storage > Value Streams, + New.   In the Choose Template pop-up, select ValueStream and click OK.   In the name field, enter DDCValueStream.   If Project is not already set, search for and select PTCDefaultProject.  At the top, click Save.   Click here to view Part 2 of this guide. 
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    Guide Concept   This project will introduce how to get your application ready for usage by actual users or ready to collect data.   Following the steps in this guide, you will be ready to present your finished application to users so they can benefit from its functionality. Deploying your application provides the ability for users to access it from anywhere, anytime and enables your edge devices to communicate with your application 24/7.   We will teach you how to deploy your ThingWorx IoT application to be ready for whatever experience you've molded it to be.     You'll learn how to   Create login screens, users and user groups Define security permissions Deploy application Identify and troubleshoot issues   NOTE: This guide's content aligns with ThingWorx 9.3. The estimated time to complete this guide is 30 minutes     Step 1: Completed Example   Download the CompletedApplication.xml attached to this guide.  Within the downloaded file, you will find Entities referenced in this lesson, including a finished application that will be used for the deployment exercise. Import and utilize this file to see a finished example and return to it as a reference if you become stuck during this guide and need some extra help or clarification.   Keep in mind, this download uses the exact names for entities used in this tutorial. If you would like to import this example and also create entities on your own, change the names of the entities you create.       Step 2: Define Organization   In order to control access to your application, you first need to create an Organization. Think of the organization entity as your company or department. Once you define the organization, you will create Users and User Groups.   Organizations are hierarchical structures that allow you to assign visibility to entities in the ThingWorx Model. You can add users and group to each level within this structure.   Organizational Structure   This is the organization defined within the sample application download for this guide.  Entity Name                Entity Type      Description Constructors Organization High level of an organization. UpperManagement User Group Executives in the organization. HR User Group HR department in the organization. Management User Group First and second tier management in the company. Laborers User Group Skilled trade workers in the organization. ConstructorsGroup User Group Security group for all employees in the company. j.general User HR Department Employee a.jones User Skilled Laborer j.lewis User Manager i.jorden User CEO default_user User User used in trial version for all company roles.      Create Organization   Follow the steps below to create an Organization and make it login ready. Once your Organization is saved, you are provided with a login screen. Customize the login page to your liking with the General Information tab of the Organization after creating it.   In the ThingWorx Composer, click the + New at the top of the screen.     Select Organization in the dropdown.     Name your Organization Constructors. Set the Project field (ie, PTCDefaultProject) and click Save     Click Edit and select the Organization tab to see the hierarchy. With the top organization selected, in the Members search bar, search for the user you have created yourself and add them. Keep track of the user you added, they will be needed to log into the application later in this guide.            View Organization   From the Home page of Composer, filter for and select the Constructors Organization. The General Information tab shows the configurations for the login screen and resetting passwords. For more information on password resets, see the Password Reset Help Page. The Login Image is where you would put your logo or an image you would want users to see when they are logging into your application. The Home Mashup is the page you would like users to go to after they have passed the login prompt. The Login Style and Login Button Style are Style Definition properties. NOTE: If you keep these fields blank, the default configurations will be applied. You can create your own Style Definitions by following steps in our Styles and States Guide.   Create Organizational Units   Let's create the structors for our Organization. With the Constructors Organization open, follow the directions below:   Click the green + button under the structure you would like to expand. Name your Organization unit UpperManagement In the Members search bar, search for the user or user group you created and add it.     Click Save. Repeat the steps to create the full hierarchy of the organization and its members.     Setup Entity Visibility   Visibility is a simple form of access control. If an entity is visible to members of an organizational unit, then its members have access to the entity.   Select the Permissions tab of any Thing you created in Composer.     Filter and select Constructors in the Search Organizations field. Click Save.         Step 3: Security and Permissions   By Default, new Users have no permission configurations. Permissions can be defined for any Entity created on the ThingWorx platform. All Entities have permission control for both design time and run time.   Design time is the period in which changes can be made to the Entity in Composer. Run time is the period in which the application is running and calls are made.   Permissions should be set for each and every Entity within the application in order to keep it secure and maintain access to services.   Select the Permissions tab of any Thing you created in Composer (ie, ConstructorsBlog).   Select the Design Time or Run Time tab.   After selecting one, filter and select a User or UserGroup to set their permissions. Set the Allow, Deny or Inheritence markers to set permissions respectively.   The Inherit category allows a user to inherit permissions from the user group it belongs to.       Step 4: Deploy Application   ThingWorx Composer is set up to allow deployment in very simple steps. An application can run locally on a computer or remotely on a server as long as an Apache Tomcat server is installed on the same machine. Simply copy the URL that is generated when you click View Mashup within Composer. That is the URL to share with users so they can access your application.     If you plan to use a Login Screen, use the View Mashup URL generated from the Login Mashup you create. To view the login page of your application, type the following URL: [server]/Thingworx/FormLogin/ (ie, localhost/Thingworx/FormLogin/Constructors).   The login page for the sample application can be found at: [server]/Thingworx/FormLogin/Constructors.     To log in using this screen, type in the username and password of a user that is in the organization.   To use one of the example Users, set their password in the Composer and test it within the login prompt. Based on the permissions you set, users will have a different view of the application when they log in.         Step 5: Logging and Troubleshooting   There are two mechanisms that enable you a view into your application and what is happening behind-the-scenes, through the ThingWorx Composer Monitoring and the ThingWorx filesystem.   ThingWorx Composer Monitoring   ThingWorx provides pages to see all logs and communications between your ThingWorx instance, your applications, and edge devices using the Monitoring drop-down in the top navigation toolbar of your Composer. To see this page click Monitoring on the left menu, then select the option you would like to see.      Resource                  Usage Application Log This page will show you the log for your application and information on the processing running. Communication Log This page is used to show communication between your ThingWorx instance and outside sources. Configuration Log This page provides information into what is happening behind the scenes for your ThingWorx Composer and how it has been configured. Security Log This page highlights any information around access to the application, composer, or any security updates Script Log Logging information you have set for scripts running in your ThingWorx instance. Error Log Details for errors within your ThingWorx instance. Remote Things This page provides the list of Entities that are able to connect to edge devices, connected to your application, and even Entities that are currently disconnected.   ThingWorx File System   Log files for ThingWorx and your application can be found in the [Root]\ThingworxStorage\logs directory. The ROOT DIRECTORY is the folder in which ThingWorx has been running (ie, C:\ThingworxStorage\logs for Windows or /ThingworxStorage/logs for Mac or Linux).   Each log file corresponds to some of the content you can see in the Monitoring dropdown in the ThingWorx Composer.       Step 6: Next Steps   Congratulations you have completed the Deploy an Application How-To, and learned how to:   Create login screens, users and user groups Define security permissions Deploy application Identify and troubleshoot issues   The next guide in the Customize UI and Display Options to Deploy Applications learning path is How to Display Data in Charts.    Additional Resources   We recommend the following resources to continue your learning experience:    Capability    Guide Build Implement Services, Events, and Subscriptions Secure Configure Permissions     If you have questions, issues, or need additional information, refer to:    Resource       Link Community Developer Community Forum Support Help Center  
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  Create Your Application Guide UI Part 5    Step 7: Test Your GUI   At this point in the lesson, your Mashup now contains: Graphics to represent data Data Logical connections between the graphical elements and the data   Run Application   Execute the following steps to test that your application works as expected. Click the View Mashup button at the top. You may have to disable your pop-up blocker to load the Mashup in a new browser tab.   2. Wait and observe the Mashup for at least 20 seconds, clicking the Manually Retrieve Counts button regularly. NOTE: The values in the Mashup will increase roughly every 10 seconds, after you press the button to manually retrieve them. This happens because the Thing you imported earlier is simulating data and the work already done by the Edge and Backend Developers in this scenario. In this simulation, different production lines are continually producing new inventory, and that information is being fed into ThingWorx Foundation. As the count for each production line reaches 100, the batch is shipped out, and the count resets to 0 for the next iteration. 3. Check the Gears Manually Set Checkbox, change the Gears Count Text Field to read 7, and click the Manually Set Counts button. After 10+ seconds have passed, click the Manually Retrieve Counts button again. NOTE: This simulates a situation where an IoT sensors in the inventory warehouse has failed. Maybe it's over or under-counting inventory. Maybe there's a network issue. Maybe the sensor has simply stopped working entirely. Regardless, the warehouse floor has contacted a user of your GUI, and asked them to manually set the inventory to the correct amount. Performing Step 4 is all that is required to do so. As long as the Gears Manually Set checkbox is active, the inventory does not increase on the 10 second timer. This is to prevent a malfunctioning sensor from providing incorrect data to your GUI. 4. Uncheck the Gears Manually Set Checkbox and click Manually Set Counts. NOTE: The Gears Count starts increasing again after 10 seconds have passed. Remember to click the Manually Retrieve Counts button to see this change. This represents the previously-malfunctioning IoT sensor having been repaired.   Spend some time interacting with your Mashup GUI to get a better sense of its functionality. For the purposes of this exercise, this is a Minimum Viable Product. After testing it and getting feedback from your users, you would likely make further enhancements.   Collect Feedback   When testing your GUI, it is a best practice to collect feedback from users regarding your design, so that you can improve the experience with your application. Example User Feedback Possible Resolution Manually Set Counts button is too easy to accidentally press. Implement a Confirmation pop-up. Manually Retrieve Counts button is not ideal, should automate Remove the manual button and implement auto-update functionality instead. Manually Set Checkboxes have confusing names. Change the text to read Disabled, indicating that the sensor-input is being ignored. User wants to use your GUI on their smartphone and on a desktop computer. Re-implement the GUI using a Responsive (rather than Static) Mashup, so that there isn’t as much dead space on larger-resolution screens. User wants a visual indication of each inventory line amount at which the pallet is shipped out. Instead of using TextBoxes to show the current inventory counts, you could implement them as Gauges, showing a minimum and maximum amount that is easy to see at-a-glance.   Now that we've gotten some feedback, let's implement one such change-request as an example.   Enhance your GUI   Set up GetProperties to automatically update whenever data changes instead of using a button to manually retrieve the data. Close your MVP Mashup browser-tab and return to the Mashup Builder. Click the button-manual-retrieve Widget to select it.   Hit your keyboard's Delete key.   Click Yes in the Remove the selected widgets? pop-up window.   Click the green </> button beside Things_MBQSThing in the top-right Data tab.   6. In the Services Filter field, type getprop. 7. Click the right-arrow beside GetProperties. Be sure to select GetProperties, not GetPropertyValues. 8. Check the Execute on Load checkbox. 9. Click Done. 10. In the Data tab on the top-right, expand the newly-added GetProperties Service. 11. Drag-and-drop Gears_Count onto textbox-gears-count. 12. On the Select Binding Target popup, click Text. 13. On the Confirm Binding Replace pop-up, click Yes. 14. Repeat steps 11-13 for Pistons_Count and Wheels_Count onto their respective TextBox Widgets. 15. Drag-and-drop Gears_Count_Manually_Set onto checkbox-gears-manual. 16. On the Select Binding Target popup, click State. 17. On the Confirm Binding Replace pop-up, click Yes. 18. Repeat steps 15-17 for Pistons_Count_Manually_Set and Wheels_Count_Manually_Set onto their respective Checkboxes. 19. Click the GetProperties Service to select it. 20. In the bottom-right Data Properties section, check the Automatically update values when able box. 21. Click Save. 22. Click View Mashup.   You have now enhanced your MVP Mashup based on user feedback. The Counts in each TextBox will automatically update whenever there is a change in the Property values, as requested. ThingWorx Foundation provides a platform that allows you to quickly create a GUI for your IoT application in an extremely flexible and agile manner. The options to continue to improve your GUI are entirely up to you.   Step 8: Next Steps   Congratulations! You've successfully completed the Create Your Application UI guide, and learned how to: Create new Mashups Choose a Static or Responsive layout Add Widgets to your Mashup Bind data Services to Widgets in your Mashup Create a functional GUI with applied usage of Widgets and Service   The next guide in the Customize UI and Display Options to Deploy Applications learning path is Basic Mashup Widgets.    Learn More   We recommend the following resources to continue your learning experience: Capability Guide Build Data Model Introduction   Additional Resources   If you have questions, issues, or need additional information, refer to: Resource Link Community Developer Community Forum Support Mashup Builder Support Help Center    
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    Watch a video tutorial on utilizing the Mashup Builder to create a User Interface (UI) for your IoT application.   Guide Concept   This project will introduce the ThingWorx Mashup Builder through the use of an instructional video. Following the steps in this video-guide, you will learn how to use this tool to create a Graphical User Interface (GUI) for your IoT Application. We will teach you how to rapidly create and update a Mashup, which is a custom visualization built to display data from devices according to your application's business and technical requirements.     You'll learn how to   Create new Mashups Choose a Static or Responsive layout Add Widgets to your Mashup Bind data Services to Widgets in your Mashup Create a functional GUI with applied usage of Widgets and Services   NOTE: The estimated time to complete this guide is 30 minutes       Step 1: Video   Click the link below to enjoy the video. You may set the video to full screen by clicking the button in the bottom-right.   If you're following along within your own ThingWorx environment, you may wish to pre-download and extract the attached MBQS_Entities.zip file. It will be used in the later half of the video as a backend data simulator.   Create Your Application UI - Video Guide     Step 2: Next Steps   Congratulations! You've successfully completed the Video Guide - Create Your Application UI, and learned how to:   Create new Mashups Choose a Static or Responsive layout Add Widgets to your Mashup Bind data Services to Widgets in your Mashup Create a functional GUI with applied usage of Widgets and Services   Learn More   We recommend the following resources to continue your learning experience:   Capability Guide Build Data Model Introduction Experience Object-Oriented UI Design Tips   Additional Resources   If you have questions, issues, or need additional information, refer to:   Resource Link Community Developer Community Forum Support Mashup Builder Support Help Center
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    Step 6: Create Master   Now that we have created our Menu Entity, we can create a Master Mashup to hold a Menu Widget. We'll use the Menu Entity to configure the Menu Widget.     Navigate to Browse > Visualization > Masters.    Click +New.    Leave the defaults and click OK.    In the Name field, type MNWM_Master. If Project is not already set, search for and select PTCDefaultProject.    At the top, click Save.    At the top, click Design.     Add Header   Now that we've created the Master Entity, we need to add space for the Menu Widget.   At the top-left, click the Layout tab.    Click Add Top.   With the new top-section still selected, scroll down in the Layout tab, and select Container Size > Fixed Size.   In the new Height field, type 50, then hit your keyboard's Tab key to apply the change.    At the top, click Save.   Add Menu Widget Now that we have somewhere to put it, we can finally add the Menu Widget and then configure it.   In the top-left, click the Widgets tab.   Drag-and-drop a Menu Widget onto the top Canvas section.   Ensure the Menu Widget is still selected, as well as the Properties tab in the bottom-left.   In the Filter field, type menu.   For the Menu Property, search for and select MNWM_Menu.    At the top, click Save.     Step 7: Menu Navigation   We now have all the elements created to navigate using a Menu. The only thing left is to assign the Master to our Homepage and then view our work.     Return to MNWM_Homepage_Mashup.    In the top-left, click the Explorer tab.   Ensure that Mashup is selected. On the bottom-left Properties tab, in the Filter field, type master.   For the Master Property, search for and select MNWM_Master.    At the top, click Save. At the top, click View Mashup. You may need to enable "pop-ups" in your browser.   Click Park.   Click Amphitheater.   Note that you may wish to set MNWM_Master for the other pages of your application, just in case anyone were to navigate directly there via URL. But simply setting it on the homepage is enough for us to see that Menu navigation is functioning correctly.       Step 8: Next Steps   Congratulations! You've successfully completed the Mashup Navigation with Menus guide. In this guide, you learned how to:   Create a Mashup to be used as a "Home" page Create more Mashups as subpages Create a Menu Entity to track Mashups Create a Master Mashup as a Header Utilize a Menu Widget for navigation   Learn More    Capability     Resource Experience Track Issues with Pareto Chart   Additional Resources   If you have questions, issues, or need additional information, refer to:    Resource       Link Community Developer Community Forum Support Foundation Help Center - Menu Entity Support Foundation Help Center - Menu Widget    
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    Step 3: Create A Tree Grid   With our MyFunctionsMashup Mashup open, let's add a Validation. A Validation is similar to an Expression, except you have the added capability of triggering Events based on a True or False outcome of your validation. We will use the Validation to check and confirm the Text Field we created only has the values we added in our Functions. Let's also add two Status Message Functions that will show whether or not a user has added any text outside of what we want.   Open the MyFunctionsMashup Mashup to the Design tab. Click the green + button in the Functions area.    In the New Function modal, select Validator.     Set the Name to isDataClean.     Click Next.  Click Add Parameter. Set the Name to text and ensure the Base Type is STRING.     Add the following code to the Expression are: if(text === "NO") { result = true; } else if(text === "YES") { result = true; } else { let array = text.split("YES").join(""); array = array.split(",").join(""); let count = array.trim().length; if(count) { result = false; } else { result = true; } }   9. Click Done.   We have our Validator in place, now we need our two Status Message Functions. Why two? You can setup one Status Message to perform the task, but for this case, we're keeping things simple.   Click the + button in the Functions area. Select Status Message in the dropdown.    Set the Name to GoodInputProvided.   Click Next. Ensure Message Type is Info. In the Message field, enter Text is all good!.   Click Done. Let's create another Status Message Function. Set the Name to BadnputProvided.   Click Next. Change Message Type to Error. In the Message field, enter Text is BAD!.   Click Done.   We now have two Status Message Functions and a Validator to help with checking our text data. Let's connect everything together. This time, let's use the Bind button.   Expand the Validator section in the Functions tab. Click the Bind (arrows) button on the isDataClean Validator. This window will help us configure connections a bit easier.    Click the down arrow by the True Event. Click Add Trigger Service.   Click Functions. Check the checkbox by GoodInputProvided.   Click Next. Click the down arrow by the False Event. Click Add Trigger Service.   Click Functions. Check the checkbox by BadInputProvided.   Click Next. You should currently have the following setup:    Let's add in our connections to the Text Field and when we'll run this Validation.    Click the down arrow by the text Property.   Click Add Source. With the Widgets tab selected, scroll down and select the Text Property of our Text Field.   Click Next. Click the down arrow by Evaluate Service. Select Add Event Trigger.   With the Widgets tab selected, scroll down and select the Clicked Property of our Button.   Click Next. You should currently have the following setup:   Click Done. Click Save and view your updated Mashup.   Your Validator is complete. You now have a way to tell when a user has inputed their own text into the text box. To try things out, add some crazy characters, hit the button, and see what happens. You might notice that you have your Expressions running at the same time as your Validator. Switch up the bindings to get it to run the way you want it to.     Step 4: Next Steps   Congratulations! You've successfully completed the Explore UI Functions guide, and learned best practices for building a complex Mashup that navigations, multiple data inputs, confirmations, and all working together effectively for an enhanced user experience.   Learn More   We recommend the following resources to continue your learning experience:    Capability     Guide Experience Object-Oriented UI Design Tips   Additional Resources   If you have questions, issues, or need additional information, refer to:    Resource       Link Community Developer Community Forum Support Mashup Builder Support Help Center
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