cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Vuforia Studio and Chalk Tech Tips

Sort by:
Hi,   we can do many tricks with Javascript in Studio and most of the times it's just a matter of copying & pasting the right code.   I'd like all Studio users, not just coders, to benefit from this, and thought I could drop here a snippet to blink a widget.    I call this a quark - from the particle physics standard model - and not atom, because it's really a smaller building block than an atom    Blinking a widget can be useful, for example, if you are not using Creo Illustrate to create a sequence but still want to draw the user attention to some item in the scene.     Here's the Javascript code to copy & paste  to your H ome.js:  (to Javascript coders: I'm using modern Javascript syntax, don't be frightened by that )   $scope.blink = function(widget, times, interval) { let w = (widget.visible !== undefined ? widget : $scope.view.wdg[widget]); if (!w || w.visible === undefined) { throw "Cannot blink this widget"; } $interval(() => w.visible = !w.visible, interval, times); }    Invoke the function like this:   blink(widget, times, delay); where widget is either the id of the widget (e.g. modelItem-1) or the widget itself (e.g. $scope.view.wdg['modelItem-1']). The other two numbers are the number of times that you want visibility to change, and the amount of milliseconds between each visibility change.     Here follow some examples.   You want to blink the widget 4 times with a 300 ms interval (and leave the widget visible at the end): blink('modelItem-1', 2*4, 300);   You want to blink the widget 4 times with a 300 ms interval (and leave the widget not visible at the end): blink('modelItem-1', 2*4+1, 300);   You can comment and suggest additional quarks if you want.   Alessio  
View full tip
This is the second Javascript quark in the series: it can be used to fade a widget out. You can find the first quark here.   Here's the code to copy & paste  to your H ome.js :   $scope.fadeOut = function(widget, time, interval) { let w = (widget.opacity !== undefined ? widget : $scope.view.wdg[widget]); if (time <= 0 || interval <= 0 || w.opacity === undefined) { throw "Cannot fade this widget"; } let steps = Math.floor(time / interval); let opDelta = w.opacity / steps; return $interval(() => w.opacity = (opDelta < w.opacity) ? (w.opacity - opDelta) : 0, interval, steps); } This quark will make the widget fade out from its current opacity to 0 in time milliseconds, uniformly decrementing opacity at every interval .   Invoke the function like this:   fadeOut(widget, time, interval);   where   widget   is either the id of the widget (e.g.   modelItem-1) or the widget itself (e.g. $scope.view.wdg['modelItem-1']), time represent the total time it takes to fade the widget out from its current opacity, and interval represents the amount of time between each opacity change.   Here's an example:   fadeOut('modelItem-1', 2000, 50); This example fades the model item out by bringing its current opacity to zero after 2 seconds with an opacity change every 50 ms.   Comments and suggestions are welcome.   -Alessio    
View full tip
This is the third JavaScript quark in the series: it can be used to change a widget color by cycling through a given array of colors. You can find the second quark here.   Here's the code to copy & paste  to your H ome.js :   $scope.cycleColors = function(widget, colors, time, interval) {   let w = (widget.color !== undefined ? widget : $scope.view.wdg[widget]);   if (!w || w.color === undefined) { throw "Cannot color-cycle this widget"; }   let originalColor = w.color;   w.color = colors[0];   w.visible = true;   w.opacity = 1;    let nSteps = Math.ceil(Math.floor(time/interval) / colors.length) * colors.length;   return $interval(iterationCount => w.color = iterationCount === nSteps ? originalColor : colors[iterationCount % colors.length], interval, nSteps); } This JavaScript quark will make the widget color cycle through the colors provided in the colors array. The effect will last time milliseconds, and each color change will happen every interval milliseconds.   Invoke the function like this:   cycleColors(widget, colors, time, interval);   where   widget   is either the id of the widget (e.g.   modelItem-1) or the widget itself (e.g. $scope.view.wdg['modelItem-1']), colors represents an array of colors (e.g. ["rgba(200,0,0,1)", "rgba(0,0,200,1)"]), time represents the total time in milliseconds it takes to execute this effect, and interval represents the amount of time in milliseconds between each color change.   Here's an example:   cycleColors("modelItem-1", ["rgba(200,0,0,1)", "rgba(0,200,0,1)", "rgba(0,0,200,1)"], 2000, 50); This example cycles the model item color through red, green and blue; the effect will last for 2 seconds with a color change every 50 ms.   Comments and suggestions are welcome.   -Alessio  
View full tip
In the post “How to select model components in a 3d model without explicit definition of model Items”  there is one point where we  require a list of component items. Often we have the  case where we get a Creo View .pvz file which was published by Creo Illustrate.  In this case Creo Illustrate will  do additional changes for  the occurrence Id path  so that if we have a bom list coming from Creo Parametric then this data  will be not usable. So the question here is :  Is it possible to extract a bom list for any *.pvz files? The answer is Yes.  We can do this  using the Creo View Toolkit API ( this is one possible option). Creo View API Toolkit consist of many different moduls : Java Toolkit , Web Toolkit (only Internet Explorer related) Office Toolkit and  the new one introduced since 5.1 release module WebGL Toolkit.  We can extract BOM list  with Java Toolkit but it requires more complex programming environment. Therefore I think it is the most easily way to use Creo View WebGL toolkit   The Toolkit WebGl is based on the Thingview.js library. When we install Creo View Toolkit we will find the following directory structure:     In the web-application-examples  directory we can find some sample files which could be a good introduction how to use this API. The documentation is the WebGLToolkitDevGuide_en.pdf  and also in html(doxygen) in the documentation sub directory:     The CreoWebGL Toolkit requires a node.js environment. So  when we want to start it we have first to start the Toolkit server: >>>node http_server.js [port]   The port parameter is optional and if we do not use it then it takes by default 8080 :     The next step is to open the localhost:port/ ExtractBomPVZ.html which implements  here our program For example a simple version which will print the components with some properties  to the chrome console  could  looks like:   <!DOCTYPE html> <html style="height: 100%"> <head> <meta charset="utf-8" /> <meta name="author" content="PTC"> <title>Creo View WebGL Viewer</title> </head> <script src="js/ptc/thingview/thingview.js"></script> <body style="height: 100%; margin: 0px"> <div id="TITLE" style="width: 100%;height: 20%;border:2; float: left"></div> <div id="CreoViewWebGLDiv" style="width: 100%;height: 80%;border:0; float: left"></div> </body> <script type="text/javascript"> var thingview; var session; var model; var model1; var model2; var MODELPATH = "sample-data/thingview_test/Machine-complete-CV.PVZ"; var MODELNAME = ""; var global_number_generated = false; var BOM_LIST = []; var USE_LOG = false; var CUR_MODELPATH = getAllUrlParams().modpath ? decodeURIComponent(getAllUrlParams().modpath) : MODELPATH; document.getElementById('TITLE').innerHTML = "<h3>Extract Bom List </h3><hr><h4>"+CUR_MODELPATH+"</h4><hr>"; window.onload = function() { //return; ThingView.init("js/ptc/thingview", function() { // ThingView should only be initialised once per frame BOM_LIST = new Array(); console.log("Creo View WebGL Viewer is now initialised"); global_number_generated = false; GLOBAL_COUNT = 0; session = ThingView.CreateSession("CreoViewWebGLDiv"); //---------------------------------- model = session.MakeModel(); ////================= Selecton Call back function definition model.SetSelectionCallback(function(type, si, idPath, selected, selType) { var JSON_OBJ = new Object; var shapeInst = session.GetShapeInstanceFromIdPath(idPath) var color = shapeInst.GetColor() var instId = shapeInst.GetIdPath(); //the shape instance instId now contains a prefix "SI_" which is bug //or at least not wanted - here remove it var instId_corrected = instId.replace(/SI_/g, ''); var instIdPath = shapeInst.GetInstanceIdPath(); console.log("idPath=" + idPath) //contains the id path e.g /1/23/3 var description = model.GetPropertyValue(idPath, "PROE Parameters", "DESCRIPTION") if (!(description == null)) console.log("description=" + description); else desciption = "---"; var sBOMPath = instId; var sBOMPath = instId_corrected; //replaced with the corrected string var sBOMIDPath = instIdPath; var sBOMID = sBOMIDPath.substring(sBOMIDPath.lastIndexOf("/") + 1) var sBOMName = sBOMPath.substring(sBOMPath.lastIndexOf("/") + 1) var sBOMDepth = instIdPath.split("/").length - 1; { console.log("NAME=part&VALUE=" + sBOMName); console.log("NAME=sBOMDepth&VALUE=" + sBOMDepth); console.log("NAME=sBOMID &VALUE=" + sBOMID); console.log("NAME=sBOMIDPath&VALUE=" + sBOMIDPath); console.log("NAME=PARTPATH&VALUE=" + sBOMName); console.log("NAME=DESCRIPTION&VALUE=" + description); console.warn("color (a=" + color.a + " b=" + color.b + " g=" + color.g + " r=" + color.r + ")"); } }); ////==================LoadFromURL with Callback model.LoadFromURLWithCallback(CUR_MODELPATH, true, true, false, function(success, isStructure, errorStack) { console.log("Model(2) LoadFromURLWithCallback - success: " + success + ", isStructure: " + isStructure); if (success) { ////============= session.SelectAllInstances() var num = session.GetSelectionCount() console.log("Number of selections =" + num) } }); ///model load from URL funciton end ///////////// }); // ThingView.init( ) end }; //window onload function end //// URL parameter handling found in the WWW Overflow and works quite good function getAllUrlParams(url) { // get query string from url (optional) or window var queryString = url ? url.split('?')[1] : window.location.search.slice(1); // we'll store the parameters here var obj = {}; // if query string exists if (queryString) { // stuff after # is not part of query string, so get rid of it queryString = queryString.split('#')[0]; // split our query string into its component parts var arr = queryString.split('&'); for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) { // separate the keys and the values var a = arr[i].split('='); // set parameter name and value (use 'true' if empty) var paramName = a[0]; var paramValue = typeof(a[1]) === 'undefined' ? true : a[1]; // (optional) keep case consistent paramName = paramName.toLowerCase(); if (typeof paramValue === 'string') paramValue = paramValue.toLowerCase(); // if the paramName ends with square brackets, e.g. colors[] or colors[2] if (paramName.match(/\[(\d+)?\]$/)) { // create key if it doesn't exist var key = paramName.replace(/\[(\d+)?\]/, ''); if (!obj[key]) obj[key] = []; // if it's an indexed array e.g. colors[2] if (paramName.match(/\[\d+\]$/)) { // get the index value and add the entry at the appropriate position var index = /\[(\d+)\]/.exec(paramName)[1]; obj[key][index] = paramValue; } else { // otherwise add the value to the end of the array obj[key].push(paramValue); } } else { // we're dealing with a string if (!obj[paramName]) { // if it doesn't exist, create property obj[paramName] = paramValue; } else if (obj[paramName] && typeof obj[paramName] === 'string') { // if property does exist and it's a string, convert it to an array obj[paramName] = [obj[paramName]]; obj[paramName].push(paramValue); } else { // otherwise add the property obj[paramName].push(paramValue); } } } } return obj; } </script> </html>   When we start the  ExtractBomPVZ.html and open the chrome debugging console (Ctrl-Shift-I)     We can call the Creo View WebGl Toolkit program above in chrome with a parameter which will specify a path of the .pvz model –> example:   http://localhost:8080/ExtractBomPVZ.html?modpath=sample-data/Brake/worldcar-brake-multi-figure.pvz   The program will selects all visible components and will print to the console the idPah, partname , color etc… One problem we have here is that we could not print it to a local file because of the security restriction of the browser. A possible solution is to send the data back to the server e.g. as Json object and save the data to the server root directory. Later we can download these file if required e.g. calling the json:   http://localhost:8080/worldcar-brake-multi-figure.pvz-bomlist.json   To implement the creation of the json file we need  to change the CreoWeb.Toolkit html file. So our program  should send data to the server.  Additionaly we  also need to modify/extend the server - http.createServer() callback function to handle also the received data.     Also as next step we will extend  the Creo View Toolkit  program file by adding a XMLHttpRequest() . This request  will send the modelname and the generated json object to the http server     The call of the Toolkit html file with a start parameter was here directly in chrome via the URL but we can also call  it from a javascript or other html file:   <!DOCTYPE html> <html style="height: 100%"> <head> <meta charset="utf-8" /> <meta name="author" content="PTC"> <title>Creo View WebGL Viewer</title> </head> <script> function callBomPVZ(path) { //window.location.href = "http://localhost:8080/ExtractBomPVZ.html?modpath="+path; var myWindow = window.open("http://localhost:8080/ExtractBomPVZ.html?modpath="+path, "_blank", "height=600,width=500",false); //setTimeout(function(){ browser.refresh(); }, 1500); } </script> <body> <hr><p> <button type="button" onclick="callBomPVZ('sample-data/thingview_test/Machine-complete-CV.PVZ')">callBomPVZ:: Machine-complete-CV.PVZ</button> <hr><p><hr> <button type="button" onclick="callBomPVZ('sample-data/Brake/worldcar-brake-multi-figure.pvz')">callBomPVZ:: worldcar-brake-multi-figure.pvz</button> </body>  
View full tip
At the frist sight the  issue , may be , seems to be more related to thingworx or navigate, but this is often a question which is related to models  used in Studio and customers want to have some tools to view such models outside Vuforia Stuido and Vuforia View . Another important point is that Vuforia Studio Preview,  Navigate Thingview  and Creo View WebGL Toolkit use /are based on  the same thingview library.   The official statement of PTC here is that thingview widget, which is part from the Navigate extension is not supported for customized mashups and correct work is guaranteed  only as part of the navigate functionality. Therefore, there is no documentation provided for the customization of this widget and no technical support cases will be handled on address of related issues. Also the geometry file formats  supported by thingview are mainly the files supported by the Creo View application. All other file formats (which are not availalbe in the open dialog box of Creo View) are not supported -> e.g. glTF format. Of course, this can change in a future versions ->  therefore, please, check for future releases always the "What's new" docs. Actually the thingview allows  opening of some simple glTF files. But this is not working for every glTF file. Mostly there is a problem when we have geometry with high complexity.  … Additional I want to pont that not supported does not mean is not allowed. So therefore, I want to provide here some Info in case that customers want to customize the thingview widgets at their own risk. (no bug fixing and no compatibility guaranteed for future Releases)   In this post I will only introduce  the concept of such mashup's/view's and then in further posts will consider the different details for the different  suppoints in the picture below.      In the picture above, we have an example for customized mashup where we have a different areas for the different functionality. The mashup displayed in design /edit mode should looks like:     The mashup contains the following main areas(marked in the picture with a callouts numbers 😞   1.) Selector for the models. This is a list element widget which provides the possibility for the  selection of a particular model. The list  here is based on an Infotable returned by a service. Here is an example how to implement such service:     For simplification reason the service contains here only 2 rows. Here is an example how to implement such service (javaScript code) :     var data = [ { "FileName": "Machine-complete-CV.PVZ", "repository_link": "https://mrerot7o.studio-trial.thingworx.io:8443/Thingworx/FileRepositories/CAD-Files-Repository/CADFiles/Machine-complete-CV.PVZ", "json_bom": "/CADFiles/json_lists/Machine-complete-CV.PVZ-bomlist.json", "json_viewable_list": "/CADFiles/json_lists/Machine-complete-CV.PVZ-viewablelist.json", "json_viewable_stepList": "/CADFiles/json_lists/Machine-complete-CV.PVZ-viewableSteplist.json" }, { "FileName": "worldcar-brake-multi-figure.pvz", "repository_link": "https://mrerot7o.studio-trial.thingworx.io:8443/Thingworx/FileRepositories/CAD-Files-Repository/CADFiles/worldcar-brake-multi-figure.pvz", "json_bom": "/CADFiles/json_lists/worldcar-brake-multi-figure.pvz-bomlist.json", "json_viewable_list": "/CADFiles/json_lists/worldcar-brake-multi-figure.pvz-viewablelist.json", "json_viewable_stepList": "/CADFiles/json_lists/worldcar-brake-multi-figure.pvz-viewableSteplist.json" } ]; var result = DataShapes.files_repository_source_shape.CreateValues(); for(var i =0;i<data.length;i++) { result.AddRow(data[i]); }   The return type of the service is an InfoTable . For the defintion of the InfoTable we need a DataShape for the used fields definitions:     The list Widget ( callout 1.)  in the picture) has a binding to the thingview data.  When we select in the list widget a model -> this will call  the services: { (getViewableSteplist_arg_path(), getViewableSteplist_arg_path_viewablename()  and GetBomStruct_arg_path() }   of the   CAD-Files-Repository (Repository Thing - means  a thing which uses the template FileRepository)  -> and will pass the arguments for the json files paths for bom , viewables and StepList .     The effect is that- when we select a model in the listWidget -> this will update the mashup and will display only data related to this model.  All models and Json Files in this example  are saved in the Repository " CAD-Files-Repository "     To upload data to the repository we can use the File Upload widget. To display (for testing)  the data we can use the GetDirectory() and GetFileListingWithLinks() services of the repositroy thing. Below is an example for tool mashup which could be used as a tool to upload and display the data in the repository -as shown in the  picture above:     2.) Model tree area (callout 2.). This will display the model tree of the assembly components. It requires a service returning an InfoTable.  - here an example the service {Things["CAD-Files-Repository"]. GetBomStruct_arg_path(the_json_path) }  is called and returns the folloiwng   output:       For the creation of the infoTable I used  here a json file. In this example the the information about the viewalbes and steps  was extracted from  PTC sample assemble worldcar-brake-multi-figure.pvz   to the file  "worldcar-brake-multi-figure.pvz-viewableSteplist.json" (attached to this post). How to generate such file with Creo View WebGL toolkit is described in the community post ( How to extract the components with properties from a pvz file )   The step how to create an InfoTable  from a  Json will is handled in an addtional post ( Service for creating of Bom - and Viewable Lists from json files )   For the  displays of the data as an assembly  tree the tree widget has the following settings:     3.) List area - the functionality in this area uses  the same services as in point 2.)  but it  displays the components bom in a Thingworx Grid widget.  This will list the Bom as list of all components  (uses also the service {Things["CAD-Files-Repository"]. GetBomStruct_arg_path(the_json_path) } )     In the mashup preview it will looks like:     4.) Area for the selection of a viewable /  viewable = Creo Illustrate Figures ( callout 3  in the  the overview picture)     To  display the viewables correctly in thingview we require to have a service/data which is based on InfoTable with specific field definition (specific field name + type  is important that it works)       We can bind the All Data of the service  (here : {Things["CAD-Files-Repository"]. getViewableList_arg_path(the_json_path) } ) to the Views property of the thingview widget. Depending on the values of the fileds HasAnimation and HasSequnece the buttons for playing of sequences and animation are shown or blanked (set the Visible property to true or false)      How to define the service used for this point (returns InfoTable with list of the viewables) is described in the post  ( Service for creating of Bom - and Viewable Lists from json files )   5.) Area for the display of the  sequence steps > data grid widget-> it displays data  only if the current viewable is a sequence.  Here  below an example for the results of the service execution (getviewableStepList )   for a Json files related to  models which have 1 (worldcar-brake-multi-figure.pvz)  respectively  2 (Machine-complete-CV.pvz) sequences. In the attached sample file  you can find  the  json file:  (worldcar-brake-multi-figure.pvz-viewableSteplist.json)       Here is an example of the mashup dipslay where we can see a Sequnece containing viewables     We can see the same mashup in design/edit mode (below). We can bind the All Data of the service  (here : {Things["CAD-Files-Repository"]. getViewableSteplist__arg_path_viewablename(the_json_path, the_viewablename) } ) to the Data property of the grid  widget. How to extract  a json file from the pvz model (e.g. worldcar-brake-multi-figure.pvz-viewableSteplist.json) and how to define the service for lnfoTable generation  e.g. getViewableSteplist_arg_path_viewablename  -> this is shown in the post ( Extracting the viewables and the seqnece steps information from a .pvz file for the usage in TWX ).      The display of the Step List  is here provided only as info. Because there  was not possible to set the current /selected dataset in the grid widget. Therefore I used  here an additional List widget (callOut 6 ) which helps to manage this problem   6.) The area of the List widget is an area  which should be made invisible. It is used only to allow the setting of the selection in the grid element. We can bind the All Data of the service  (here : {Things["CAD-Files-Repository"].getViewableSteplist__arg_path_viewablename(the_json_path, the_viewablename) } ) to the Data property of the List  widget (callOut 6). The list element ( 6.) could be blanked because it is only used to set the selection of the  gird table (default  functionality of the Data selection )   How to extract  a json file from the pvz model (e.g. worldcar-brake-multi-figure.pvz-viewableSteplist.json) and to define the service for it  e.g. getViewableSteplist_arg_path_viewablename  - is shown in the post( Extracting the viewables and the seqnece steps information from a .pvz file for the usage in TWX ).   7.) This is the area with the panel of the Thingview (Thingview is a thingworx  extension). The thingview widget is part of the windchill navigate module. If the extension is installed , we can check this in the Extension manager:     In the package details we can see  that the thingview widget is installed on this thingworx instance  
View full tip
In this article  I want to consider the question how to   define a  TWX service, which could create   a  Bom and Viewable Lists from  json files. This will be very helpful option when we want to display some CreoView data in  Thingview.   How to extract BOM and viewable data form a Creo View /Illustrate *.pvz file is shown in the post "How to extract the components with properties from a pvz file".   In this example the json files are saved already  in a thingworx repository (means a thing form template FileRepostiroy) e.g.  "CAD-Files-Repository" :   1.)Create a service for the BOM List /InfoTable                 edit the CAD-Files-Repository thing and create a new service named  "GetBomStruct_arg_path" set  the BaseType : INFOTABLE . Set the DataShape property of the service - > here to BomListStuct -> this datashape need to be created  first . It should have the following Fields / property (all String type):                               create a service input parameter "the_json_path". Using this parameter we can past the repository path to the service edit the java script . We can past the following script (see the comments in the script area) var params = { path: the_json_path /* STRING */ // path it set to the input argument // example for such setting value // --> "/json_lists/Machine-complete-CV.PVZ-bomlist.json" var Content = Things["CAD-Files-Repository"].LoadJSON(params); //This will call the method LoadJSON(params) of the thing CAD-File-Reposistory var params1 = { infoTableName: undefined /* STRING */, dataShapeName: "BomListStruct" /* DATASHAPENAME */ }; // result: INFOTABLE var jsonTable = Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(params1); var result = DataShapes.ThingviewBomData.CreateValues(); // working fine for(i in Content.array){ jsonTable.AddRow({Part:Content.array[i].part, Description:Content.array[i].description, sBOMDepth:Content.array[i].sBOMDepth, sBOMID:Content.array[i].sBOMID, sBOMIDPath:Content.array[i].sBOMIDPath, sBOMName:Content.array[i].sBOMName, sBOMPath:Content.array[i].sBOMPath, path:Content.array[i].sBOMIDPath, parentPath:Content.array[i].sBOMIDPath.substring(0,Content.array[i].sBOMIDPath.lastIndexOf('/')) }); } result = jsonTable;   The parentPath  infoTable field is required for Tree Widget  to display the BOM list as tree The following code:   for(i in Content.array) { jsonTable.AddRow(Content.array[i]);}   the  code above will transfer  1 to 1  all  fields defined  in the json file with data into  infoTable fields. In this case  is not used because we have different mapping for "parentPath" -> it is new in the output InfoTable and is not contained by the json file. Test the  service:     2.)Create a service for the BOM List /InfoTable (steps are similar to 1.) edit the CAD-Files-Repository thing and create a new service named  " getViewableList_arg_path " set  the BaseType : INFOTABLE . Set the DataShape property of the service - > here to viewablelist_new -> this datashape need to be created  first . It should have the following Fields / property (all String type)     Create a service input parameter "the_json_path". Using this parameter we can past the repository path to the service Edit the java script . We can past the following script (see the comments in the script area):   var params = { //path: "/json_lists/Machine-complete-CV.PVZ-viewablelist.json" /* STRING */ path: the_json_path /* STRING */ }; var Content = Things["CAD-Files-Repository"].LoadJSON(params); var params1 = { infoTableName: undefined /* STRING */, dataShapeName: "viewablelist_new" /* DATASHAPENAME */ }; // result: INFOTABLE var jsonTable = Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(params1); var result = DataShapes.ThingviewBomData.CreateValues(); for(i in Content.array){ jsonTable.AddRow({name:Content.array[i].name, //type:Content.array[i].description, type:"viewable", value:Content.array[i].value, hasAnimation:Content.array[i].hasAnimation, hasSequence:Content.array[i].hasSequence }); } result = jsonTable;   Test the  service:      
View full tip
This post should provide more detailed steps additionally  to the posts ("How to extract the components with properties from a pvz file"[1.] and "How to use ThingView Widget from Navigate to display CAD Model/Viewables in custom mashup- Concept"[2])  This post should consider more detailed the steps for the extracting of viewables and also how to extract the sequence steps information from a .pvz / Creo Illustrate model for further usage in a Thingworx service. Following steps: 1.) Extracting the data from the Creo View Model ( Created from Creo Illustrate via publish to pvz functionality) As described in [1.] we required for the extraction of information a Creo View Toolkit.  A good choice will be the usage the Creo View  WebGL toolkit module.   A web toolkit program is called inside a html document ,where the javaScript Creo View WebGl Api is embedded. So, the most important logic could be called on the windows load function. The code below will initialize  the thingview library and  will open the pvz model file (value of variable CUR_MODELPATH in the code below  is set the complete model path):   ... window.onload = function() { ThingView.init("js/ptc/thingview", function() { // ThingView should only be initialised once per frame //---------------------------------- //send the modelname to server var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest(); xhr.open("POST", "RAY_LOG_FILE:", true); xhr.setRequestHeader("Content-Type", "application/json"); xhr.onreadystatechange = function() { if (xhr.readyState === 4 && xhr.status === 200) { var json = JSON.parse(xhr.responseText); } }; //set the json modelname object var JSON_BOM_MODEL_OBJ = new Object; MODELNAME = CUR_MODELPATH.substring(CUR_MODELPATH.lastIndexOf("/") + 1) JSON_BOM_MODEL_OBJ.name = "BOMMODELNAME"; JSON_BOM_MODEL_OBJ.value = MODELNAME; xhr.send(JSON.stringify(JSON_BOM_MODEL_OBJ)) console.warn("sent BOMMODELNAME=" + MODELNAME) //finish the sending of the model_name //---------------------------------- console.log("Creo View WebGL Viewer is now initialised"); session = ThingView.CreateSession("CreoViewWebGLDiv"); //refers to the CreoViewWebGLDiv -> a div area in the html fileSource // which contains the code var xhttp = new XMLHttpRequest(); MODELNAME = CUR_MODELPATH.substring(CUR_MODELPATH.lastIndexOf("/") + 1) xhttp.open("POST", "RAY_JSON_VIEWABLE:", true); xhttp.setRequestHeader("Content-Type", "application/json"); xhttp.onreadystatechange = function() { if (xhttp.readyState === 4 && xhttp.status === 200) { var json = JSON.parse(xhttp.responseText); } }; var js_obj = new Object; js_obj.name = "VIEWABLE"; js_obj.value = MODELNAME; var data = JSON.stringify(js_obj); xhttp.send(data); model = session.MakeModel(); ////==================LoadFromURL Callback model.LoadFromURLWithCallback(CUR_MODELPATH, true, true, false, function(success, isStructure, errorStack) { var illustrations = model.GetIllustrations(); for (var i = 0; i < illustrations.size(); i++) { console.log("Illistration name: " + illustrations.get(i).name); // seems illustrations.get(i).name == pviFile model.LoadIllustrationWithCallback(illustrations.get(i).name, function(success, pviFile, stepInfoVec) { if (success === true) { var hasAnimation = model.HasAnimation() var hasSequence = model.HasSequence() xhttp.open("POST", "RAY_JSON_VIEWABLE:", true); xhttp.setRequestHeader("Content-Type", "application/json"); xhttp.onreadystatechange = function() { if (xhttp.readyState === 4 && xhttp.status === 200) { var json = JSON.parse(xhttp.responseText); } }; var js_obj = new Object; js_obj.name = pviFile; js_obj.value = pviFile; js_obj.type = "viewable"; js_obj.hasSequence = hasSequence; js_obj.hasAnimation = hasAnimation; var data = JSON.stringify(js_obj); xhttp.send(data); for (var ii = 0; ii < stepInfoVec.size(); ++ii) { xhttp.open("POST", "RAY_JSON_VIEWABLE_STEP:", true); xhttp.setRequestHeader("Content-Type", "application/json"); xhttp.onreadystatechange = function() { if (xhttp.readyState === 4 && xhttp.status === 200) { var json = JSON.parse(xhttp.responseText); } }; var step_obj = new Object; console.log("step nr=" + ii); step_obj.viewablename = pviFile; step_obj.nr = ii; step_obj.name = stepInfoVec.get(ii).name; step_obj.description = stepInfoVec.get(ii).description; var data = JSON.stringify(step_obj); xhttp.send(data); //============================================= } } }) } ////============= setTimeout(function() { { xhttp.open("POST", "RAY_JSON_VIEWABLE:", true); xhttp.setRequestHeader("Content-Type", "application/json"); xhttp.onreadystatechange = function() { if (xhttp.readyState === 4 && xhttp.status === 200) { var json = JSON.parse(xhttp.responseText); } }; var js_obj = new Object; js_obj.name = "FINISHVIEWABLES"; var data = JSON.stringify(js_obj); xhttp.send(data); } }, 10000); }); ///model load from URL funciton ///////////// }); // ThingView.init( ) }; //window onload function   The program will generate 2 different json files and will send them to the http server. When the Creo View WegGl program is started (load  the html file from the http server)  - on the server side - in the node.js console  we can see the printing of the received data - example on the picture below:     The Creo View WebGl program will create on the server side  2 json files (this requires also handling of the received  data on the server side as allready mention in the post [1.]  ) For the data extraction I used in this example the PTC demo file (provided with the installation of Creo View Toolkit) : worldcar-brake-multi-figure.pvz,  worldcar-brake-multi-figure.pvz-viewableSteplist.json   [{"viewablename":"Sequence","nr":0,"name":"Sequence","description":""}, {"viewablename":"Sequence","nr":1,"name":"Step 1","description":"Remove spring clips"}, {"viewablename":"Sequence","nr":2,"name":"Step 2","description":"Release 4 bolts"}, {"viewablename":"Sequence","nr":3,"name":"Step 3","description":"Pull apart the calipers"}] worldcar-brake-multi-figure.pvz-viewablelist.json [{"name":"Figure 1","value":"Figure 1","type":"viewable","hasSequence":false,"hasAnimation":false}, {"name":"Sequence","value":"Sequence","type":"viewable","hasSequence":true,"hasAnimation":false}, {"name":"Parts List","value":"Parts List","type":"viewable","hasSequence":false,"hasAnimation":false}, {"name":"Sectioning","value":"Sectioning","type":"viewable","hasSequence":false,"hasAnimation":false}, {"name":"Translation","value":"Translation","type":"viewable","hasSequence":false,"hasAnimation":false}, {"name":"Animation","value":"Animation","type":"viewable","hasSequence":false,"hasAnimation":true}]   2.) Definition of a service in Thingworx for the returning of the Sequence Step List (see also " Service for creating of Bom - and Viewable Lists from json files "  [3]  )    Here the first Step is to define a general service which will will convert the JSON file from a file repository to an InfoTable using particular dataShape.  The json file will be taken from a  repository:   var params = { path: the_json_path /* STRING */ }; var Content = Things[the_Repository_Name].LoadJSON(params); var params1 = { infoTableName: undefined /* STRING */, dataShapeName: the_dataShape_name /* DATASHAPENAME */ }; // result: INFOTABLE var jsonTable = Resources["InfoTableFunctions"].CreateInfoTableFromDataShape(params1); var result = DataShapes.ThingviewBomData.CreateValues(); for(i in Content.array){ jsonTable.AddRow(Content.array[i]); } result = jsonTable; //returns the InfoTable     The service has 3 Input parameters : the_json_path, the_dataShape_name and the_Repository_Name (all are String type)       This service could be called for any filerepository, containing any json files(it is not file specific) . Via the dataShape name we will specify the filed definitions.  We need to do this  for each specific json file. In this case we have to  create first manually a DataShape which is compatible to the Json Object.  For example when we start the service RayJsonToInfoTable:     And the dataShape what we need to define for  this particular example:       For the achieving  of the final goal -> the creation of the  Sequence Step List. We need to create a  another service where we can specify the arguments for DataShape and  repository name. Example:     So the input argumets are:  I.) the path to the json file and II.) the name of the sequence for which we want to see the steps.     I am not sure if we can omit the step , where we create a  dataShape for specific json - so some kind of  dynamic dataShape generation - because in such case  we need only to specify the json file without manual editing opreration.      
View full tip
Using Connection Filters for state-based rendering and value formatting   State-based rendering of properties that come from user inputs or from connected ThingWorx data is a common requirement. Think about the following scenario: from ThingWorx you get the state of a as one of these values: [ OK | At-Risk | Issue ]. You would like to visualize it with a 3D image or a changed 3DGauge icon.   You can achieve that easily with a Vuforia Studio functionality that is often overseen: The Connection Filters. With connection filters you can achieve a lot of very nice a common features, mainly: number and date formatting value pre- and postfixing (specifically units for numbers but also anything else) state-based formatting, e.g. changing the image or style based on a number change   Here is what I mean in practice:   Step 1:   Step 2:   Here is the stateBasedStyling Connection Filter content:   return value < 3000 ?    "fill:rgba(255, 255, 255, 1);textbaseline:middle;textalign:center" :    "fill:rgba(255,   0,   0, 1);textbaseline:middle;textalign:center" ;   value is a key word and represents the value on the connection before applying the filter function. The returned value is the one that is used in the bound-to attribute. I found that the expression has to be a one-liner (technically), i.e. you have to start your expression with 'return' and can't do something like:   if(value < 3000) return "fill:rgba(255, 255, 255, 1);textbaseline:middle;textalign:center"; else return "fill:rgba(255,   0,   0, 1);textbaseline:middle;textalign:center";     Resulting Filter in ThingWorx Studio: You can add multiple filters but I didn't check yet in which sequence they'll be evaluated (top-to-bottom or bottom-to-top).     Examples of Usage   1. Show icons for Enum values: I used it often to display enumerated-type values (i.e. the input values are from a discrete value set e.g.named colors) with images/icons:   return "app/resources/Uploaded/colorImg_" + value + ".png" ;   in combination with the corresponding uploaded images, in this case named colorImg_red.png, colorImg_blue.png, etc.   2. Format Numbers and postfix with unit The following formats the input number 12.769 to 12.8 mph.   return $filter ( 'number' )(value, 1) + " mph" ;     See the AngularJS documentation for the available filter types. Relevant are: currency number date   I haven't tested yet if these filters can also be applied to input arrays of objects that come from a service (e.g. for a repeater widget). If this is supported the array-based filters may be applicable/usable as well.  
View full tip
Announcements

Topics available:
AR/VR for Data Optimization AR/VR for Security and Control AR/VR for Inspection