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    Step 9: Create Event and Subscription   In this section, you will create a mechanism to notify the user when inclement weather occurs. For example, whenever the weather indicates storm/snow/rain, an   Event   should be triggered. This event is then handled by a service called a   Subscription.   For this tutorial, while updating weather information inside the service   UpdateWeatherInfo,we need to fire an Event:   BadWeather   when the weather description indicates either storm/snow/rain. This Event is handled by a Subscription:   HandleWeather, which is a service that gets called whenever the   BadWeather   Event is fired. The subscription service   HandleWeather   updates a property called   AlertNotification.   Create Event   In this part of the lesson, we will create an Event:   BadWeather   that updates weather information inside the service   UpdateWeatherInfo   when the weather description indicates either storm/snow/rain.   Create a property   AlertNotification   with a baseType   STRING   using the Add Property feature of the plugin we discussed before. Right click inside your   java file->ThingWorx Source->Add Event.   Set the name to  BadWeather  and set a name for the Data Shape to  Weather. NOTE : This custom Data Shape has to be created in Composer. Importing Datashapes and other custom entities created in Composer into your extension will be discussed later in the tutorial. Our DataShape  Weather includes one field called WeatherDescription with a STRING base type.  Click Finish. NOTE: This will create annotation for your EventDefinition.    Create Subscription   In this part of the lesson, we will create a Subscription:   HandleWeather, which is a service that gets called whenever the   BadWeather   Event is fired. The subscription service   HandleWeather   updates a property called   AlertNotification. Right click inside your java file   ->ThingWorx Source->Add Subscription   Set the Event Name to   BadWeather   and Handler Service to   HandleWeather. NOTE : This means that whenever the BadWeather event is fired, the HandleWeather service will be executed. Source is left blank if the event belongs to the same template. Click  Finish . This creates annotation for subscription service and also creates a new service called HandleWeather.   Modify Service   In this part of the lesson, you'll ensure that when the properties are updated,   BadWeather   event is triggered if the description indicates rain/snow/thunderstorm. To do this, we will modify the   UpdateWeatherInfo   service.   After we have called the setPropertyValue method for the properties   WeatherDescription   and   Temperature, we can check if the weather description contains snow/rain/thunderstorm. We will create an InfoTable from the   Weather   Datashape. InfoTables represent data sets that take the structure of the Datashape. Each row of an InfoTable can be passed as a ValueCollection to hold data within the table. When an event is fired, we need to send data along with it. This data will be passed as an InfoTable and it is then handled by the Subscription handling the Event.We use a ValueCollection to add the weatherDescription to the InfoTable. Then, this InfoTable is set as the Event Data.   Add the code snippet to   UpdateWeatherInfo   section at the end of the service after setting the properties- Temperature and WeatherDescription. /* fire event BadWeather */ if (description.contains( "snow" ) || description.contains( "rain" ) || description.contains( "thunderstorm" )) { ValueCollection v = new ValueCollection(); v.put( "weatherDescription" , new StringPrimitive(description)); InfoTable data = InfoTableInstanceFactory.createInfoTableFromDataShape( "Weather" ); data.addRow(v); _logger.info( "Firing event" ); ThingworxEvent event = new ThingworxEvent(); event .setEventName( "BadWeather" ); event .setEventData(data); this .dispatchEvent( event ); } Inside the   HandleWeather   service, set the property   AlertNotification. Ensure that you have created the property   AlertNotification   using the eclipse plugin. Add the following code snippet to the   HandleWeather   service. @ThingworxServiceDefinition (name = "HandleWeather" , description = "Subscription handler" , category = "" , isAllowOverride = false, aspects = { "isAsync:false" }) public void HandleWeather( @ThingworxServiceParameter (name = "eventData" , description = "" , baseType = "INFOTABLE" ) InfoTable eventData, @ThingworxServiceParameter (name = "eventName" , description = "" , baseType = "STRING" ) String eventName, @ThingworxServiceParameter (name = "eventTime" , description = "" , baseType = "DATETIME" ) DateTime eventTime, @ThingworxServiceParameter (name = "source" , description = "" , baseType = "STRING" ) String source, @ThingworxServiceParameter (name = "sourceProperty" , description = "" , baseType = "STRING" ) String sourceProperty) throws Exception { _logger .trace ( "Entering Service: HandleWeather with: Source: \" \ ", Event: \" BadWeather\ ", Property: \" \ "" ); this .setPropertyValue ( "AlertNotification" , new StringPrimitive( "Alert:" +eventData.getFirstRow().getStringValue( "weatherDescription" ))); _logger .trace ( "Exiting Service: HandleWeather" ); } Now we have an event   BadWeather   fired every time weather description indicates storm/snow/rain and it is handled by   HandleWeather   service that sets the   AlertNotification   property to the InfoTable data passed by the event.     Step 10: Add Composer Entities In previous parts of this tutorial, we assumed we had a datashape Weather available with field weatherDescription as the Datashape of our event: BadWeather. In this part of the lesson, we'll create a DataShape. Go to ThingWorx Composer. Click the + button. In the dropdown, select Data Shape. Enter a name, for example: Weather. Add a Field Definition weatherDescription with baseType STRING. Click check mark in the top left, then Save.   Click the  More  drop-down, then click  Export . Export the DataShape entity from Composer, it will download in your system as an xml file. Go back to Eclipse, right-click on your project  ->Import..->ThingWorx->Entities. Click Next. Browse to the directory where the xml file was downloaded. Select the xml file and Click Finish.   NOTE : This adds the xml file to the Entities folder in your project. Following the same procedure, import other entities required for this Extension stored in the Entities folder of the download we provided for this training.   NOTE : You can uncheck the box for importing DataShapes_Weather.xml, if you already loaded your Datashape in the previous steps.     Click here to view Part 5 of this guide.
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  Step 7: Add JAR Resources   You can add external JARs for use by your extension. Every third-party JAR that is not already included in either the ThingWorx Extension SDK or ThingWorx Core needs to be added to your extension project as a JAR Resource. These JAR resources are added to your metadata.xml as a tag and are used to reference the Java classes in the third-party JAR on which the extension depends. You can either use the Add button   or the ThingWorx Menu from the menu bar to add a new JAR resource. By doing so, the JAR is automatically updated in the metadata file and added to the build path. Although ThingWorx allows developers to include jar files for third-party libraries in their code, it is recommended that you avoid adding jar files for common libraries and instead use the jar files that are included with the SDK. Adding jar files to an extension could cause conflicts with jar files already used by the ThingWorx server, either when uploading an extension, or when an extension executes. Even if your extension works today, future updates to ThingWorx may require updates to your extensions. Similarly, packaging a verison of a commonly used library may mean that a customer will not be able to use your extension together with someone else’s extension.   Select the project to which you want to add the jar file to and select   New Jar Resource.       Open the directory in which you have stored the training files for this tutorial. Browse to the   Jars   directory. Select the   json-simple-1.1.1.jar   file. Add a   description   and click   Finish. NOTE : This will automatically add json-simple-1.1.1.jar to the lib folder and to your project’s build path. Add httpclient-4.5.6.jar, httpcore-4.4.10.jar and commons-logging-1.2.jar directly into the twx-lib folder in the Project folder. NOTE: These JARs are included in the group of JARs used by ThingWorx by default. In order to build your extension locally, without bundling the jars into your extension that are available on the ThingWorx server, add the above JARs to your project's build path by right-clicking on your project in the Package Explorer, right-click  Your_Extension_Project (ie, MyThingWorxWeatherExtension)  and select  Build Path -> Configure Build Path.  Verify the jars we added are in the build path. Otherwise, click  Add JARs , then browse to the directory containing these JARs ( lib ) and add them. NOTE : twx-lib folder is a hidden folder and does not appear in the Eclipse package explorer. The twx-lib folder can be found in the WeatherExtension project inside the Eclipse workspace directory.   Step 8: Create Services   Now that you have created properties, configuration tables and added the required jars, you can begin to add services to your WeatherThingTemplate.   In this part of the lesson, we’ll add a service,   UpdateWeatherInfo   that will take a   City   parameter and update the properties of this template using the values obtained from the openWeatherMap API.   Right click inside the   WeatherThingTemplate   and select   ThingWorx Source->Add Service. Create a new service with name   UpdateWeatherInfo. Click   Add   in the   Input Parameters   frame to add   City   parameter with a base type   STRING.   Set the name and base type of the   Output Parameter   based on the value that you want the service to return. For simplification, assume this service returns nothing. Set the Base Type to   NOTHING. Click   Finish   to create the service. Copy and Paste the code for   UpdateWeatherInfo   as specified below. @ThingworxServiceDefinition (name = "UpdateWeatherInfo" , description = "updates weather description and temperature properties" , category = "" , isAllowOverride = false , aspects = { "isAsync:false" }) @ThingworxServiceResult (name = "Result" , description = "" , baseType = "NOTHING" ) public void UpdateWeatherInfo ( @ThingworxServiceParameter(name = "City" , description = "city name" , baseType = "STRING" ) String City) throws Exception { _logger.trace( "Entering Service: UpdateWeatherInfo" ); String cityProp = this .getPropertyValue( "CurrentCity" ).getStringValue(); if (City == null ){ City = cityProp; } else { this .setPropertyValue( "CurrentCity" , new StringPrimitive(City)); } String url = "http://api.openweathermap.org/data/2.5/weather?q=" +URLEncoder.encode(City, "UTF-8" ) + "&appid=" + _appid+ "&units=imperial" ; // create a http client HttpClient client = new DefaultHttpClient(); // create a get request with the URL HttpGet getRequest = new HttpGet(url); // add Accept header to accept json format response getRequest.addHeader( "Accept" , "application/json" ); // send the get request and obtain a response HttpResponse response = client.execute(getRequest); // if response is successful the status code will be 200. if (response.getStatusLine().getStatusCode() == 200 ) { BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader( new InputStreamReader(response.getEntity().getContent())); StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); String line = "" ; while ((line = br.readLine()) != null ) { sb.append(line); } JSONParser parser = new JSONParser(); JSONObject json = (JSONObject) parser.parse(sb.toString()); JSONArray weather = (JSONArray) json.get( "weather" ); Iterator<JSONObject> it = weather.iterator(); String description = (String) it.next().get( "description" ); this .setPropertyValue( "WeatherDescription" , new StringPrimitive(description)); double temp = (Double) ((JSONObject) json.get( "main" )).get( "temp" ); this .setPropertyValue( "Temperature" , new NumberPrimitive(temp)); /* fire event BadWeather */ _logger.trace( "Exiting Service: UpdateWeatherInfo" ); } }   Troubleshooting Issue Solution The iterator() is undefined in JSONArray Import only org.json.simple.*. Importing other JSON libraries can give this error. HttpClient/HttpGet could not be resolved to a type. Make sure you have imported the jars: httpclient-4.5.2.jar, httpcore-4.4.5.jar and commons-logging-1.2.jar, json-simple-1.1.1.jar as indicated in the previous chapter. Make sure you have imported the following packages in your template by Eclipse   Your code should be similar to the following:   package com.thingworx.weather; import java.io.BufferedReader; import java.io.InputStreamReader; import java.net.URLEncoder; import java.util.Iterator; import org.apache.http.HttpResponse; import org.apache.http.client.HttpClient; import org.apache.http.client.methods.HttpGet; import org.apache.http.impl.client.HttpClientBuilder; import org.json.simple.JSONArray; import org.json.simple.JSONObject; import org.json.simple.parser.JSONParser; import org.slf4j.Logger; import com.thingworx.logging.LogUtilities; import com.thingworx.metadata.annotations.ThingworxBaseTemplateDefinition; import com.thingworx.metadata.annotations.ThingworxConfigurationTableDefinition; import com.thingworx.metadata.annotations.ThingworxConfigurationTableDefinitions; import com.thingworx.metadata.annotations.ThingworxDataShapeDefinition; import com.thingworx.metadata.annotations.ThingworxFieldDefinition; import com.thingworx.metadata.annotations.ThingworxPropertyDefinition; import com.thingworx.metadata.annotations.ThingworxPropertyDefinitions; import com.thingworx.metadata.annotations.ThingworxServiceDefinition; import com.thingworx.metadata.annotations.ThingworxServiceParameter; import com.thingworx.metadata.annotations.ThingworxServiceResult; import com.thingworx.things.Thing; import com.thingworx.types.primitives.NumberPrimitive; import com.thingworx.types.primitives.StringPrimitive; @ThingworxBaseTemplateDefinition(name = "GenericThing") @ThingworxPropertyDefinitions(properties = { @ThingworxPropertyDefinition(name = "CurrentCity", description = "", category = "", baseType = "STRING", isLocalOnly = false, aspects = { "defaultValue:Boston", "isPersistent:true", "isLogged:true", "dataChangeType:VALUE" }), @ThingworxPropertyDefinition(name = "Temperature", description = "", category = "", baseType = "NUMBER", isLocalOnly = false, aspects = { "defaultValue:0", "isPersistent:true", "isLogged:true", "dataChangeType:VALUE" }), @ThingworxPropertyDefinition(name = "WeatherDescription", description = "", category = "", baseType = "STRING", isLocalOnly = false, aspects = { "dataChangeType:VALUE" }) }) @ThingworxConfigurationTableDefinitions(tables = { @ThingworxConfigurationTableDefinition(name = "OpenWeatherMapConfigurationTable", description = "", isMultiRow = false, ordinal = 0, dataShape = @ThingworxDataShapeDefinition(fields = { @ThingworxFieldDefinition(name = "appid", description = "", baseType = "STRING", ordinal = 0, aspects = { "isRequired:true" }) })) }) public class WeatherThingTemplate extends Thing { private static final long serialVersionUID = -5294151832877452442L; public WeatherThingTemplate() {} private static Logger _logger = LogUtilities.getInstance().getApplicationLogger(WeatherThingTemplate.class); private String _appid; @Override public void initializeThing() throws Exception {     super.initializeThing();     _appid = (String) this.getConfigurationSetting("OpenWeatherMapConfigurationTable", "appid"); } @ThingworxServiceDefinition(name = "UpdateWeatherInfo", description = "updates weather description and temperature properties", category = "", isAllowOverride = false, aspects = {     "isAsync:false" }) @ThingworxServiceResult(name = "Result", description = "", baseType = "NOTHING") public void UpdateWeatherInfo(     @ThingworxServiceParameter(name = "City", description = "city name", baseType = "STRING") String City) throws Exception {     _logger.trace("Entering Service: UpdateWeatherInfo");     String cityProp = this.getPropertyValue("CurrentCity").getStringValue();     if (City == null){         City = cityProp;     } else {         this.setPropertyValue("CurrentCity", new StringPrimitive(City));     }     String url = "http://api.openweathermap.org/data/2.5/weather?q=" +URLEncoder.encode(City,"UTF-8") + "&appid="+ _appid+"&units=imperial";     // create a http client     HttpClient client = HttpClientBuilder.create().build();     // create a get request with the URL     HttpGet request = new HttpGet(url);     // add Accept header to accept json format response     request.addHeader("Accept", "application/json");     // send the get request and obtain a response     HttpResponse response = client.execute(request);     // if response is successful the status code will be 200.     if (response.getStatusLine().getStatusCode() == 200) {         BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(response.getEntity().getContent()));         StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();         String line = "";         while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {             sb.append(line);         }         JSONParser parser = new JSONParser();         JSONObject json = (JSONObject) parser.parse(sb.toString());         JSONArray weather = (JSONArray) json.get("weather");         Iterator<JSONObject> it = weather.iterator();         String description = (String) it.next().get("description");         this.setPropertyValue("WeatherDescription", new StringPrimitive(description));         Double temp = (Double) ((JSONObject) json.get("main")).get("temp");         Number number = (Number) temp;         this.setPropertyValue("Temperature", new NumberPrimitive(number));         _logger.trace("Exiting Service: UpdateWeatherInfo");     } } }     Click here to view Part 4 of this guide.
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    Build extensions quickly and extend your application functionality with the Eclipse Plugin.   GUIDE CONCEPT   Extensions enable you to quickly and easily add new functionality to an IoT solution. Extensions can be service (function/method) libraries, connector templates, functional widgets, and more.   The Eclipse Plugin for ThingWorx Extension Development (Eclipse Plugin) is designed to streamline and enhance the creation of extensions for the ThingWorx Platform. The plugin makes it easier to develop and build extensions by automatically generating source files, annotations, and methods as well as updating the metadata file to ensure the extension can be imported.   These features allow you to focus on developing functionality in your extension, rather than worrying about getting the syntax and format of annotations and the metadata file correct.   YOU'LL LEARN HOW TO   Install the Eclipse Plugin and Extension SDK Create and configure an Extension project Create Services, Events and Subscriptions Add Composer entities Build and import an Extension   NOTE: This guide's content aligns with ThingWorx 9.3. The estimated time to complete all parts of this guide is 60 minutes.   Step 1: Completed Example    Download the attached file needed for this tutorial: ExtensionSampleFiles.zip.   The   ExtensionSampleFiles.zip   file provided to you contains a completed example of the scenario you will be walk through in the following steps. Utilize this file if you would like to see a finished example as a reference or if you become stuck during this guide and need some extra help.     Step 2: Download Plugin and SDK    The ThingWorx Extension SDK provides supported classes and APIs to build Java-based extensions. The APIs included in this SDK allow manipulation of ThingWorx platform objects to create Java based extensions that can extend the capability of the existing ThingWorx platform.   The Eclipse Plugin assists in working with the Extension SDK to create projects, entities, and samples. Download the  Eclipse Plugin . Download the Extension SDK. . Make a note of the directory where the plugin and the extension SDK are stored. The path of the directory will be required in upcoming steps.   Do not extract the zip files.     Step 3: Install and Configure   Before you install the plugin, ensure that software requirements are met for proper installation of the plugin. Open   Eclipse   and choose a suitable directory as a workspace. Go to the menu bar of the Eclipse window and select   Help->Install New Software… After the   Install   window opens, click   Add   to add the Eclipse Plugin repository. Click   Archive…   and browse to the directory where the   Eclipse Plugin zip   file is stored and click   Open. Enter a name (for example, Eclipse Plugin).     Click   OK. NOTE : Do not extract this zip file. Ensure that the   Group items by category   checkbox is not selected. Select   ThingWorx Extension Builder   in the items list of the   Install window. Click   Next   and the items to be installed are listed Click   Next   and review the license agreement. Accept the license agreement and click   Finish   to complete the installation process.   NOTE : If a warning for  unsigned content is displayed, click OK to complete the installation process. Restart Eclipse. When Eclipse starts again, ensure that you are in the ThingWorx Extension perspective. If not, select   Window->Perspective->Open Perspective->Other->ThingWorx Extension, then click   OK.      NOTE : Opening any item from File->New->Other…->ThingWorx will also change the perspective to ThingWorx Extension.     You are ready to start a ThingWorx Extension Project!     Click here to view Part 2 of this guide.  
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    Step 4: Create Extension Project   In this tutorial, you will create a ThingWorx extension that retrieves weather information using   OpenWeatherMap API. Create Account In this part of the lesson, you will create a free account in OpenWeatherMap that creates an AppKey so you can access their REST API. Sign-up   for a free account. Log in   to your account. Create a new API Key   NOTE : We will use this generated API key as a parameter in the REST calls.   Create New Extension Project   NOTE : Make sure that you are in the ThingWorx Extension Perspective. To verify, you should see a plus icon:   in the menu bar. If you don’t see this, you are probably in the wrong perspective. Go back to the previous step to learn how to set the perspective to ThingWorx Extension in Eclipse .   Go to   File->New->Project. Click   ThingWorx->ThingWorx Extension Project.   Click  Next. NOTE: A New ThingWorx Extension window will appear. Enter the   Project Name   (for example,   MyThingworxWeatherExtension). Select   Gradle   or   Ant   as your build framework. Enter the   SDK location   by browsing to the directory where the Extension SDK is storeed.   NOTE : The Eclipse Plugin accepts the Extension SDK version 6.6 or higher. Enter the   Vendor information   (for example, ThingWorx Labs). Change the default package version from 1.0.0 to   support extension dependency. NOTE: The information from ThingWorx Extension Properties is used to populate the metadata.xml file in your project. The metadata.xml file contains information about the extension and details for the various artifacts within the extension. The information in this file is used in the import process in ThingWorx to create and initialize the entities. Select the   JRE version   to   1.8. Click   Next   then click   Finish. Your newly created project is added to the   Package Explorer   tab.   Create New Entity   Select your project and click   Add   to create a new entity. NOTE : You can also access this from the ThingWorx menu on the menu bar. Create a   Thing Template   for your   MyThingWorxWeatherExtension   Project.   NOTE : In this guide, we are using a Template, but in a real-world scenario, you may consider using a Thing Shape to encapsulate extension functionality. By using Thing Shapes you give users of your extension the ability to easily add new functionality to existing Things. It is simple to add a new Thing Shape to an existing Thing Template, while using the properties or services defined by a Thing Template would require recreating all existing assets using the new Template. Since subscriptions cannot be created on Thing Shapes, you might choose to create Thing Templates that implement one or more subscriptions for convenience. In the pop-up window, browse to add the source folder of your project in Source Folder. NOTE: It should default to the src directory of your project. In our case it will be MyThingworxWeatherExtension/src. Browse to add the package where you want to create this new class, or simply give it a name (such as   com.thingworx.weather). Enter a   name   and   description   to your Thing Template (WeatherThingTemplate).  NOTE : By default, the Base Thing Template is set to GenericThing. Select Next. NOTE: If you want to give other users of this entity permission to edit it in ThingWorx Composer, select the entity as an editable entity. Only non-editable entities can be upgraded in place; editable entities must be deleted and recreated when your extension is updated. If you need to make it possible to customize the extension, consider using a configuration table to save user customizations. Select Finish.   Verify that you have a WeatherThingTemplate class created that extends the Thing class. @ThingworxBaseTemplateDefinition (name = "GenericThing" ) public class WeatherThingTemplate extends Thing { public WeatherThingTemplate () { // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub } } NOTE: You might see a warning to add a serial version. You can add a default or generated serial value.   Step 5: Add Properties    In this section, you are going to add   CurrentCity,   Temperature   and   WeatherDescription   properties to the   WeatherThingTemplate. These properties are associated with the Thing Template and add the   @ThingworxPropertyDefinitions   annotation before the class definition in the code.   Right click inside the WeatherThingTemplate class or right click on the WeatherThingTemplate class from the Package Explorer. Select   ThingWorx Source-> Add Property. In the popup window, create a property to store the city name. Name =   CurrentCity, Base Type =   STRING, Description = ‘’ Select the   Has Default Value   checkbox and enter a city name (eg.   Boston). This will be the default value unless a specific value is passed. Select the “Persistent” checkbox. This will maintain the property value if a system restart occurs.   NOTE: If you select the Logged checkbox, the property value is logged to a data store. If you select the Read Only checkbox, the data will be static. Select   VALUE   from the   Data Change Type   drop down menu       NOTE : This allows any Thing in the system to subscribe to a data change event for this property. Choose to use one of the following Data Change Types:   Data Change Type Description Always Fires the event to subscribers for any property value change Never Does not fire a change event On For most values, any change will trigger this. Off Fires the event if the new value is false Value For numbers, if the new value has changed by more than the threshold value, fire the change event. For non-numbers, this setting behaves the same as   Always. Select   Finish. Create another property called   Temperature   with a base type of   NUMBER. You can keep the default values for the other parameters. Create another property called   WeatherDescription   with a base type of   STRING. Keep the default values for the other parameters.   Step 6: Create Configuration Table   In this part of the lesson, we will create a configuration table to store the   API Id   that you generated from the   openMapsWeather. Configuration tables are used for Thing Templates to store values similar to properties that do not change often.   Right-click inside the   WeatherThingTemplate   class and select   ThingWorx Source->Add Configuration Table. Create a new configuration table with name   OpenWeatherMapConfigurationTable. Click   Add   in the   Data Shape Field Definitions   frame. NOTE: Configuration tables require fields (columns) with a defined table structure (DataShape). Enter   appid   as the name with a base type   STRING. Select the   Required   checkbox. Click   OK, then   Finish   to add the Configuration Table To use the  appid  in the REST calls, you need to obtain the value from the configuration table and assign it to a field variable in the Java code. We will use the  initializeThing  method to obtain the  appid  value at runtime. NOTE: The initializeThing() method acts as an initialization hook for the Thing. Every time a Thing is created or modified, this method is executed and the value of appid is obtained from the configuration table and stored in a global field variable of the class. initializeThing() must call super.initializeThing() to ensure it performs initialization of the Thing. Create the initializeThing() method and field variable _appid with base type STRING anywhere in the WeatherThingTemplate class. private static Logger _logger = LogUtilities.getInstance().getApplicationLogger(WeatherThingTemplate.class); private String _appid; @Override public void initializeThing() throws Exception { super .initializeThing(); _appid = (String) this .getConfigurationSetting( "OpenWeatherMapConfigurationTable" , "appid" ); } NOTE : In the code above we used ThingWorx LogUtilities to get a reference to the ThingWorx logging system, then assigned the reference to the variable  _logger. In the steps below we will use this variable to log information. There are multiple kinds of loggers and log levels used in the ThingWorx Platform, but we recommend that you use the application or script loggers for logging anything from inside extension services. If prompted to import the logger, use slf4j.     Click here to view Part 3 of this guide.
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    Step 11: Build Extension   You can use either Gradle or Ant to build your ThingWorx Extension Project.   Ant is the preferred method.   Build Extension with Gradle   Right click on your project   ->Gradle (STS)->Tasks Quick Launcher.     NOTE : This opens up a new window.   Set   Project   from the drop-down menu to your project name and type Tasks as   build . Press   Enter   NOTE : This will build the project and any error will be indicated in the console window. Your console window will display BUILD SUCCESSFUL. This means that your extension is created and stored as a zip file in your_project->build->distributions folder.   Build Extension with Ant   Go to the Package explorer   -> your_project->. Right click on   build-extension.xml->Run As->Ant Build   Your console output will indicate BUILD SUCCESSFUL.   NOTE: This will build your project and create the extension zip in the your_project->build->distributions folder of your project.     Step 12: Import Extension    If you have valuable data on your ThingWorx server, save the current state before importing an untested extension by duplicating and renaming the   ThingworxStorage   directory. This will save all current entities and a new, empty ThingworxStorage directory will be generated when Tomcat is restarted. To restore your saved state, rename the duplicate directory back to   ThingworxStorage. Alternatively, If you do not back up your storage, make sure that any entities you want to save are exported into xml format. This way you will be able to restore your ThingWorx server to its initial state by deleting the storage directory before importing the saved entities.   Import Extension In the lower left corner, click   Import/Export, then select   Import. NOTE: The build produces a zip file in ProjectName->build->distributions folder. This zip file will be required for importing the extension. For the   Import Option   option, select   Extension. Click Browse and choose the zip file in the distributions folder (located in the Exclipse Project's build directory). Click Import.   Create a Thing   Create a Thing using the ThingWorx Composer with the Thing Template set to the   WeatherThingTemplate.     Open the   ConfigurationTable   tab and add the   appid   from the   OpenWeatherMap.org   site.   Open the  WeatherAppMashup  Mashup by searching for  WeatherAppMashup  in the  Search  bar.   Click   View Mashup   in the   WeatherAppMashup   Mashup window. Type the name of a city (eg. Boston) and click   go.   NOTE: You can now see the current temperature reading and weather description of your city in the Mashup.   Troubleshooting   If your import did not get through with the two green checks, you may want to modify your metadata.xml or java code to fix it depending on the error shown in the logs.   Issue Solution JAR Conflict arises between two similar jars JAR conflicts arise when a similar jar is already present in the Composer database. Try to remove the respective jar resources from the metadata.xml. Add these jars explicitly in twx-lib folder in the project folder inside the workspace directory. Now, build the project and import the extension in ThingWorx Composer once again. JAR is missing Add the respective jar resource in metadata.xml using the ThingWorx->New Jar Resource. Now, build the project and import the extension in ThingWorx Composer once again. Minimum Thingworx Version [ 7.2.1] requirements are not met because current version is: 7.1.3 The version of SDK you have used to build your extension is higher than the version of the ThingWorx Composer you are testing against. You can manually edit the configfiles->metadata.xml file to change the Minimum ThingWorx version to your ThingWorx Composer version.   Step 13: Next Steps    Congratulations! You've successfully completed the   Create an Extension   tutorial, and learned how to:   Install the Eclipse Plugin and Extension SDK Create and configure an Extension project Create Services, Events and Subscriptions Add Composer entities Build and import an Extension   Learn More We recommend the following resources to continue your learning experience:" Capability Guide Build Application Development Tips & Tricks Additional Resources If you have questions, issues, or need additional information, refer to: Resource Link Community Developer Community Forum Support Extension Development Guide
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Hello community,   I'm happy to announce that I released GitBackup Extension 4.1.0 with some nice help from the community (special thanks to Tanguy Parmentier who provided all the localization export functionality). Many thanks for the people who provided feedback allowing this features to be prioritized.   Version 4.1.0 brings several new features to the table: (Finally) Allows the user to specify a subset of Entities for Export Allows importing a single Entity from the Workspace, so it’s easier now to checkout a specific commit in the past and import that file version for testing. Adds the capability to Export localization tokens filtered by a specific prefix - overridable by you at export time. Adds a Log screen that contains log entries for some of the most used methods that caused silent fails. Closed remote branches are auto-pruned. Further cleans the ThingWorx XML source files, by removing the ModelPersistenceProviderPackage. The Main Mashup UI is slightly redesigned: there's a new Manage tab which holds the Settings, Delete Git Thing and more. The Export Mashup UX is improved: export buttons are no longer visible if you don't select a project. Supports ThingWorx 9.0 Two separate releases: one for 8.4&8.5 and one for 9.0 The documentation was updated and I suggest further reading the release notes and specifically the ones regarding the new Log and prune capabilities. In addition, the mechanism that cleans the source code is extensible, and most of the entities are editable, allowing you to tweak it to your own usecase.   The Extesion source code is available here: https://github.com/PTCInc/thingworx-gitbackup-extension The importable Extension zip files are available here: https://github.com/PTCInc/thingworx-gitbackup-extension/releases   Special note for people using ThingWorx 9.0: in this version some internal ThingWorx SDK Java methods changed their signature, and this required me to build a special releases for 9.0. The extension I built for 9.0 won't run correctly in 8.4/8.5 and also the reverse. As such, you will always see two releases for each GitBackup version: one for 9.0 and one for the 8.4/8.5. My ask for you is the following: don't click on the latest release Github shows - that will always send you to the latest release, which might not be compatible with the ThingWorx version you are using always use the link above to choose the Extension compatible with your ThingWorx version read carefully which release you download. The title contains the ThingWorx version compatible with that release.   This Extension is licensed under the MIT Licence and is provided as-is and without warranty or support. It is not part of the PTC product suite.   Taking into consideration the statement above: please read first the documentation if you encounter any problems, search first for closed issues, and if none is found for your problem, raise a new issue in GitHub's issue system: https://github.com/PTCInc/thingworx-gitbackup-extension/issues do not open PTC Tech Support tickets for this Extension   For OOTB Git support in the ThingWorx platform, please raise a ThingWorx Idea in the PTC Community here https://community.ptc.com/t5/ThingWorx-Ideas/idb-p/thingworxideas   Thank you!
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Applicable Releases: ThingWorx Platform 7.0 to 8.5   Description:   Introduction to ThingWorx Extension Development, with the following topics: What is an Extension Why building an Extension Prerequisites Installing Eclipse plugin and features Creating entities with the plugin and including exported Entities in an Extension Project Upgrading or Updating and Existing extension in ThingWorx Building with Gradle and Ant       ThingWorx Extension Development Guide
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Good evening and Happy New Year!   I launched version 2.3.0 of the GitBackup Extension.  The release is available here https://github.com/vrosu/thingworx-gitbackup-extension/releases/tag/V2.3.0   It adds the capability to push commits using User specific Committer Name and Email. This is an optional feature, which allows multiple developers to push commits under their own credentials. The documentation was updated with more details about this.   This release certifies the Extension to work for ThingWorx 8.5.x. (Previous ThingWorx versions have not been tested and the documentation was updated accordingly).    As always, this extension is not a PTC supported product, so in case you have issues with it, please do not open a PTC Tech Support ticket and instead use GitHub's issue system or the PTC Community.   Please feel free to fork and improve it.
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Hi,   I launched version 2.1.0 of the ThingWorx GitBackup Extension on Github, in the following repository: https://github.com/vrosu/thingworx-gitbackup-extension This release contains a few UI fixes and experimental support for proxy.   "The GitBackup extension is updated on a best-effort basis and accepts community fixes, that are best done through GitHub. Please report any troubles via GitHub's Issue system.   Important notice: As you might be aware, we have just launched ThingWorx 8.5 and with it a new solution called Solution Central, which is a brand-new cloud-based service to help you package, store, deploy, and manage your  ThingWorx  applications.   This service is supported by PTC and it contains features that seem to be similar to the GitBackup extension, but they are not.  They are different type of tools: Git is a source versioning tool, while Solution Central is an artifact repository. When deploying applications between ThingWorx instances you should use Solution Central, while if you want to version your entities during development you can use the GitBackup extension"  
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Since the marketplace extension is no longer supported and the drivers may be outdated, you may build your own jdbc package/extension: Download the Extension Metadata file  Here Download the appropriate JDBC driver Build the extension structure by creating the directory   lib/common Place the   JAR   file in this directory location: lib/common/<JDBC driver jar file> Modify the   name   attribute of the   ExtensionPackage   entity in the   metadata.xml   file as needed Point the   file   attribute of the   FileResource   entity to the name of the JDBC JAR file The metadata also contains a ThingTemplate the name is set to MySqlServer, but can be modified as needed Select the lib folder and   metadata.xml   file and send to a zip archive Tip: The name of the zip archive should match the name given in the   name   attribute of the  ExtensionPackage   entity   in the   metadata.xml   file Import the newly created extension as usual To the JDBC extension, simply create a new thing and assign it the new   ThingTemplate   that was imported with the JDBC extension Configuration Field Explanation: JDBC Driver Class Name ​Depends on the driver being used Refer to documentation JDBC Connection String ​Defines the information needed to establish a connection with the database Connection string examples can be found in the   ThingWorx Help Center ConnectionValidationString ​A simple query that will work regardless of table names to be executed to verify return values from the database   Alternatively, y ou may download the jdbc connector creator from the marketplace here  https://marketplace.thingworx.com/Items/jdbc-connector-extension Then you may just view the mashup and use it to package your jdbc jar into an extension (which can be later imported into ThingWorx).  
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Attached (as PDF) are some steps to quickly get started with the Thingworx MQTT Extension so that you can subscribe / publish topics.
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Disclaimer: Please note that, while the ThingWorx Git Backup Extension is a very useful tool, it is not a PTC product, nor is it supported by PTC.   Hi ThingWorx users,   Trying to manage your ThingWorx application artifacts in a CI process? Wondering who changed that line of code in your Thing Service? Trying to see what your Mashup looked like last release? Time to Git excited! Introducing the Git Backup Extension, an open-source tool available here to offer a stronger integration with the Git source repository. This Git feature can push or pull code and artifacts (like entities, data exports or extension dependencies) to your Git repository.   Here are some highlights of how this works within ThingWorx:   First, configure your Git repo to work with ThingWorx by creating a Git Backup Thing. Then, simply open your new Thing, navigate to the Configuration editor and enter information like your Git URL, your Git username and password, your repo and branch names, etc. See example below. Configuring your Git repo With this configuration in place, you can now use the Home Mashup of this new Git thing to browse the repository and pull down contents to your local ThingWorx instance. For new projects, you can also push new entities to the repo as you work on your application.   As you and your team are working, you’ll want to see the differences of the files you are editing and working on collaboratively. The Git extension feature makes this easy. Just like you can see diffs clearly delineated for a file with your Git client, you can see the same with this Git integration in ThingWorx. Similar to the git status command, the Git ThingWorx extension will show you the list of files you have changed that are available to push, as well as their diffs. See an example below. Checking the Git status While working, if you want to switch branches or pull down a new project, you can check out a specific version and see all commits available on that branch (see below). Checking out a specific commit Want to learn more or try it for yourself? Find the open-source Git Backup Extension here and check out the Git Backup Extension User Guide for guidance.   Stay connected, Kaya   P.S. What do you think? Comment your thoughts below!
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Hi, ThingWorx users! We’re excited to share that we have partnered with InfluxData to make time series analysis in ThingWorx even easier. InfluxDB is a database by InfluxData that is “built specifically for metrics and events that empower developers to build next-generation IIoT, analytics and monitoring applications.”   Why InfluxData?  Today, application developers expect robust querying capabilities, fast response time, easy ways of aggregating and pivoting on data and leveraging results for reporting and visualization. IT and devops administrators also expect cost-effective storage and easy ways of aging data through archiving and the ability to keep large amounts of historical data to satisfy analysis requirements.   That’s why we’ve partnered with InfluxData to make it easier for developers to store, analyze and act on IIoT data in real-time. With InfluxData, developers can build connected IIoT applications more quickly while still incorporating the following capabilities: monitoring real-time alerting predictive maintenance streaming data anomaly and event detection visual and report-based analysis   We considered a few technologies for the purpose of improving ThingWorx time series analysis. Here are a few reasons we chose InfluxData: high compression of data ~45x ability to handle millions of writes per second* ability to read around thousands of rows in milliseconds* supports the standard time series functions of sampling, interpolation, time bucketing, aggregation, selector, transformation, predictor, etc.  * Query and write times will vary based on an individual ThingWorx application’s implementation with Influx. For example, as the number of concurrent reads increases, the query speed decreases. With the upcoming 8.4 release, the ThingWorx Sizing Guide will be updated to reflect representative performance for ThingWorx developers.   In addition to improved query capability, ThingWorx time series with Influx can now use less memory and CPU, giving your platform servers a bit of a break.   To start strategizing on how InfluxData can help you in your ThingWorx journey, here is a sneak preview of what it will look like:   New Features The new ThingWorx Influx Persistence Provider will make query services like ValueStream Thing QueryPropertyHistory, Stream Thing QueryStreamData and QueryStreamEntries even better. Simply create a new instance of the persistence provider, configure it to use your InfluxDB instance, create a new value stream (or stream) from the new persistence provider, and you’ll be writing, reading and analyzing your time series data like never before.   We’re also introducing a new enhancement to improve InfoTable support with time series data, including providing the ability to use a driver property. The driver property can be specified with the QueryPropertyHistoryWithDriverProperty service for time alignment and filling backward/forward in your stream queries.   Let’s walk through a driver property example where you have the properties of temperature, speed and battery level. Timestamp Temperature Speed Battery Level 1480589076592000000 80.003 5012 79 1480589077537000000 80.010 5011 79 1480589077550000000 80.010 5009 79 1480589077562000000 80.030 5011 78   Let’s say temperature is the key driver for your analysis. In other words, you are not concerned if speed or battery level changes—you only care about   when temperature changes. We can specify temperature to be the driver property for that particular time and only return stream values for temperature, speed and battery level when temperature changes. If speed or battery level changes (but temperature does not change), the rows associated with those changes would not be included in the results set because neither speed nor battery level is a driver property. See chart below.  Timestamp Temperature (driver) Speed Battery Level 1480589076592000000 80.003 5012 79 1480589077537000000 80.010 5011 79 1480589077562000000 80.030 5011 78  Note that only three of the four rows are returned above because one entry in the original table did not have a change in temperature.    Stay Tuned Look out for these time series improvements and InfluxData integration in our upcoming 8.4 release. I’ll be sure to keep you updated on additional new features coming in our next release (like Orchestration and Mashup Builder 2.0), so check back shortly or subscribe to this Community so we can stay in touch. As always, if you have any questions, just ask Kaya!   Stay connected, Kaya
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This video go through the steps required to use the Creo Insight extension: - Download and install the required extension - Set required config.pro options - Create provider in Analytics Manager - Publish sensor from Creo - Create analysis Event in Analysis Manager - Retrieve sensor values from ThingWorx in Creo     See also: - https://www.ptc.com/en/support/article?n=CS277514  for a  written version of those steps. - Creo Help Center  
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Key Functional Highlights Add connectivity to National Instruments TestStand Make it easier to edit the apps Easier to find mashups and things in Composer Support for Asset sub-types Open up the tag picker to allow adding any connection types through Composer General App Improvements Enhance tag picker to improve speed of configuration Make it easier to add additional properties to assets Make app configuration more intuitive by centralizing the configuration Controls Advisor Merge the Server and Connection status fields Asset Advisor Performance improvement when displaying pages Add support for CFS/ServiceMax integration Added trial support for Service     Compatibility ThingWorx 8.2.x KEPServerEX 6.2 and later KEPServerEX V6.1 and older as well as different OPC Servers (with Kepware OPC aggregator) National Instruments TestStand 2016 SP1 and later Support upgrade from 8.0.1 and later     Documentation What’s New in ThingWorx Manufacturing Apps ThingWorx Manufacturing Apps Setup and Configuration Guide What’s New in ThingWorx Service Apps ThingWorx Service Apps Setup and Configuration Guide ThingWorx Manufacturing and Service Apps Customization Guide     Download ThingWorx Manufacturing Apps Freemium portal ThingWorx Manufacturing and Service Apps Extensions
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Video Author:                     Asia Garrouj Original Post Date:            March 31, 2017 Applicable Releases:        ThingWorx Analytics 7.4 to 8.1   Description: This video is the second part of a two part video series walking thru the configuration of Analysis Event which is applied for Real-Time Scoring.  T his second video will walk you thru the configuration of Analysis Event for Real Time Scoring and validating that a predictions job has been executed based on new input data.    
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Video Author:                     Christophe Morfin Original Post Date:            October 6, 2017 Applicable Releases:        ThingWorx Analytics 8.1   Description: This video covers the new features of ThingWorx Analytics Builder 8.1      
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Video Author:                     Christophe Morfin Original Post Date:            June 2, 2017 Applicable Releases:        ThingWorx Analytics 7.4 to 8.1   Description: In this video we show a simple mashup and services in order to display the ThingPredictor's real time scoring results.  
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Video Author:                     Christophe Morfin Original Post Date:            March 31, 2017 Applicable Releases:        ThingWorx Analytics 7.4 to 8.1   Description: This video walks you through the use of Analysis Replay to execute analysis events on historical data.    
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Video Author:                     Asia Garrouj Original Post Date:            March 31, 2017 Applicable Releases:        ThingWorx Analytics 7.4 to 8.1   Description: This video is the first of a two part video series walking thru the configuration of Analysis Event which is applied for Real-Time Scoring.  T his 1st video demonstrates how to create a Template and Thing which allows for the prediction model to score in real-time.   Note: This video is intended for demo purposes.  Customers who already have ThingWorx should already have their properties set-up.  In this case, you will need to configure the Analysis Event, which is demonstrated in the second part of this video series.    
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Video Author:                     Asia Garrouj Original Post Date:            March 31, 2017 Applicable Releases:        ThingWorx Analytics 7.4 to 8.1   Description: This video will walk you through the first steps on how to set-up Analytics Manager for Real-Time Scoring and demonstrate how to share your predictive model from Analytics Builder into Analytics Manager, as well as to test the shared model.    
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